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DrCrawdad
02-23-2006, 07:21 AM
I just bought this gift from eBay for a Cub fan friend.

http://www.tommcmahon.net/images/1908.jpg
A 1908 penny.

The shipping was more than my winning bid of .99.

Hangar18
02-23-2006, 07:52 AM
I just bought this gift from eBay for a Cub fan friend.

http://www.tommcmahon.net/images/1908.jpg
A 1908 penny.

The shipping was more than my winning bid of .99.

heh hehheh

Steelrod
02-23-2006, 07:58 AM
I just bought this gift from eBay for a Cub fan friend.

http://www.tommcmahon.net/images/1908.jpg
A 1908 penny.

The shipping was more than my winning bid of .99.
This peeny appears to be in better shape than the 1908 Cubs, or any Cub team since!

miker
02-23-2006, 01:24 PM
Hangar's going to buy a whole roll and throw them out at Cubbie fans...

Baby Fisk
02-23-2006, 01:27 PM
Would that be Pocahontas?

He gone
02-23-2006, 01:34 PM
I asked my Great Aunt (she will be 106 years old this year) if she remembers the Cubs winning the World Series. Her reply, " The Cubs have never won the World Series". :D:

Just like me, she has Selective Memory. :cool:

PaulDrake
02-23-2006, 01:59 PM
I just bought this gift from eBay for a Cub fan friend.

http://www.tommcmahon.net/images/1908.jpg
A 1908 penny.

The shipping was more than my winning bid of .99. I'm trying to type this instead of ROTLF. I know a few cub fans who might appreciate one of these.

mjharrison72
02-23-2006, 03:03 PM
Would that be Pocahontas?

Apparently not (http://coins.about.com/library/weekly/aa101402a.htm):
Legend has it that the model for the design of the Indian Head cent was the designer's (Mr. Longacre's) daughter Sarah. According to the rumor, she was present in his office when a number of Indian chiefs were visiting there. One of the chiefs placed a war bonnet on Sarah's head and that became the inspiration for her father's design of the coin. Unfortunately, this charming story does not appear to be accurate, as Longacre himself stated before his death that the head design was based primarily upon a likeness of an ancient Greek statue.

Baby Fisk
02-23-2006, 03:09 PM
Apparently not (http://coins.about.com/library/weekly/aa101402a.htm):
But was that image intended to be anyone specific (eg. a particular president or monarch), or just a generic native head?

mjharrison72
02-23-2006, 03:16 PM
But was that image intended to be anyone specific (eg. a particular president or monarch), or just a generic native head?
I guess I'm under the impression it's just a generic head. And just FYI, Baby Fisk, the United States has never actually had a Native American president. :wink:

hold2dibber
02-23-2006, 06:24 PM
I'm very much looking forward to derisively chanting "NINETEEN ... OH EIGHT" at Cubs fans during Sox/Cubs games this year. Heh heh.

FielderJones
02-23-2006, 06:47 PM
Too funny! The last year the US Mint made Indian Head pennies is the last year the Cubs won the World Series.

Railsplitter
02-24-2006, 12:45 PM
Would the friend get the joke?

Dolly
02-24-2006, 02:20 PM
I guess I'm under the impression it's just a generic head. And just FYI, Baby Fisk, the United States has never actually had a Native American president. :wink:Actually, they've all been native Americans since George Washington. :wink:

Dancin' Homer
02-27-2006, 02:27 AM
Actually, they've all been native Americans since George Washington. :wink:
From Wikipedia:
Martin Van Buren (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Van_Buren), born December 5 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/December_5), 1782 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1782), was the first president born after the Declaration of Independence (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Declaration_of_Independence) and was thus arguably the first president who was not born a British subject (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_subject). Interestingly, he is also the first president not of Anglo-Celtic origin.
John Tyler (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Tyler), born March 29 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/March_29), 1790 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1790), was the first president born after the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. All presidents born before him were eligible to be president because they were citizens at the time the Constitution was adopted. (Zachary Taylor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zachary_Taylor) was born on November 24 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/November_24), 1784 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1784), before the Constitution was adopted).Presidential Trivia rules.

mjharrison72
02-27-2006, 09:53 AM
Actually, they've all been native Americans since George Washington. :wink:

Native American
n., adj. American Indian.

The caps are the key. :cool:

MisterB
02-27-2006, 10:02 AM
Presidential Trivia rules.

Yes, but only by consent of the people. :D:

And Native American (double caps) refers to ethnicity, although politically most of us are native Americans.

mjharrison72
02-27-2006, 10:07 AM
Yes, but only by consent of the people. :D:

And Native American (double caps) refers to ethnicity, although politically most of us are native Americans.
I had a teacher in high school who tried to advocate the term "Aboriginal Americans." I really do not like the term "Indians," because it was coined by Columbus, who thought he was in India. A complete misnomer.

SOXintheBURGH
02-27-2006, 10:09 AM
I had a teacher in high school who tried to advocate the term "Aboriginal Americans." I really do not like the term "Indians," because it was coined by Columbus, who thought he was in India. A complete misnomer.

That entire story is wrong. India wasn't called India back then, it was called Hindustan. The term Indians came from "En Dios" which was derived from "people of God" that he was trying to convert to Catholicism, and when that didn't work, he eradicated them.

SoxFan76
02-27-2006, 02:11 PM
That entire story is wrong. India wasn't called India back then, it was called Hindustan. The term Indians came from "En Dios" which was derived from "people of God" that he was trying to convert to Catholicism, and when that didn't work, he eradicated them.

mj, you just got served!

Seriously, I didn't know that.

mjharrison72
02-27-2006, 02:34 PM
That entire story is wrong. India wasn't called India back then, it was called Hindustan. The term Indians came from "En Dios" which was derived from "people of God" that he was trying to convert to Catholicism, and when that didn't work, he eradicated them.
Well, if that's the case, then I've been misinformed. I think my mistake was to say "India" when I apparently meant "Indies"... from the entry at Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_name_controversy):
The term Indian is commonly thought to have been born of the misconception by Christopher Columbus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Columbus) that the Caribbean (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caribbean) islands were the islands in Southeast Asia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southeast_Asia) known to Europeans as the Indies (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Indies), which he had hoped to reach by sailing West. Even though Columbus's mistake was soon recognized, the name stuck, and for centuries the native people of the Americas were collectively called Indians.
Even if it is the case that SITB is correct and the name has no relation to India or the Indies, it remains fact that Columbus did not realize he was in a completely different part of the world. That's why we live in America (named after Amerigo Vespucci, who realized the continent was a new discovery --at least for the Europeans) and not Columbia.

And lost in all this is my point that I would prefer not to call these people what Columbus -- whose relationship with the people he encountered in the New World was less-than-savory -- did. And for lack of a better term, I used "Native American."

SOXintheBURGH
02-27-2006, 03:08 PM
Well, if that's the case, then I've been misinformed. I think my mistake was to say "India" when I apparently meant "Indies"... from the entry at Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_name_controversy):

Even if it is the case that SITB is correct and the name has no relation to India or the Indies, it remains fact that Columbus did not realize he was in a completely different part of the world. That's why we live in America (named after Amerigo Vespucci, who realized the continent was a new discovery --at least for the Europeans) and not Columbia.

And lost in all this is my point that I would prefer not to call these people what Columbus -- whose relationship with the people he encountered in the New World was less-than-savory -- did. And for lack of a better term, I used "Native American."

:cheers:

Damn Spaniards.

MisterB
02-27-2006, 03:17 PM
That entire story is wrong. India wasn't called India back then, it was called Hindustan. The term Indians came from "En Dios" which was derived from "people of God" that he was trying to convert to Catholicism, and when that didn't work, he eradicated them.

Could you quote source on this?

edit: N/M

SOXintheBURGH
02-27-2006, 03:18 PM
Could you quote source on this?

A hippie liberal college professor trying to brainwash me.

mjharrison72
02-27-2006, 03:20 PM
:cheers:

Damn Spaniards.
Good... glad we can still clink glasses after getting "served." :hug: :drunken:

And considering how we (I) hijacked the thread with a discussion of the coin iteself and of Native American semantics, I'd like to throw in my opinion that a 1908 penny is a fantastic gift for a Cub fan friend.

SOXintheBURGH
02-27-2006, 03:21 PM
Good... glad we can still clink glasses after getting "called out." :hug: :drunken:

And considering how we (I) hijacked the thread with a discussion of the coin iteself and of Native American semantics, I'd like to throw in my opinion that a 1908 penny is a fantastic gift for a Cub fan friend.

I concur with this sentiment.

1951Campbell
02-27-2006, 04:53 PM
And for lack of a better term, I used "Native American."

Careful. A lot of Indians in the Southwest hate that term. They prefer "Indian."

mjharrison72
02-28-2006, 10:57 AM
Careful. A lot of Indians in the Southwest hate that term. They prefer "Indian."
There's not really any term that everyone is going to like. Best, when possible, to use tribe names (Navajo, Sioux, Ojibwe, etc.), as far as I have been told. The problem comes in when trying to refer to people collectively.

What's a good politically correct lefty to do?

gobears1987
02-28-2006, 10:58 AM
Tickets to a Sox game. If it converts him, it will be the best thing to happen to him.

Railsplitter
02-28-2006, 11:18 AM
I had a teacher in high school who tried to advocate the term "Aboriginal Americans." I really do not like the term "Indians," because it was coined by Columbus, who thought he was in India. A complete misnomer.

Amen, Amen, and Amen
.

Also, the root of the word "native" deals with birth, not ancestry. (Think Nativity)

SoxFan76
02-28-2006, 12:30 PM
Good... glad we can still clink glasses after getting "served." :hug: :drunken:

And considering how we (I) hijacked the thread with a discussion of the coin iteself and of Native American semantics, I'd like to throw in my opinion that a 1908 penny is a fantastic gift for a Cub fan friend.

lol I'm just messing around.