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View Full Version : This is a SOX town


JoeItalia7
01-23-2006, 01:11 PM
I was watching the news last night on fox and they were talking about Chicago turning to a sox town. The special guest on there said he believes that Chicago is 75-25%, that being cubs fans to sox fans. I dont believe that, there is no way 75% of chicago are cubs fans, and only 25% are sox. Maybe before all the bandwagoners jumped on this year id say a little more cubs than sox, but 75-25 is a lie. Look at the world series parade, almost 2 million, need i say more?

Palehose13
01-23-2006, 01:13 PM
I see where this may be going, so I am going to put it in "What's the Score" so the cub lovers can do what they want...

kittle42
01-23-2006, 01:18 PM
It's at least 70% Cub fans, in my opinion. Then again, I am a north sider.

Chisox003
01-23-2006, 01:18 PM
Thanks Gary, always so useful.

:whocares

Whatchu talkin bout Chisox?

SOXintheBURGH
01-23-2006, 01:19 PM
I'm a Sox fan, you're a Sox fan, we're all Sox fans here.

IlliniSox
01-23-2006, 01:20 PM
I was watching the news last night on fox and they were talking about Chicago turning to a sox town. The special guest on there said he believes that Chicago is 75-25%, that being cubs fans to sox fans. I dont believe that, there is no way 75% of chicago are cubs fans, and only 25% are sox. Maybe before all the bandwagoners jumped on this year id say a little more cubs than sox, but 75-25 is a lie. Look at the world series parade, almost 2 million, need i say more?

1.) The obligitory 'Who Cares?'

2.) I'll play devil's advocate: 2 million people is about 25% of the Chicago Metropolitan population.

3.) One more time:

:whocares

SoxFan76
01-23-2006, 01:50 PM
It is not 75-25. More like 50-30 Cubs-Sox, and 20% who root for either team. And that 20 might be a little low. But Cub fans are an interesting bunch, and most will turn on their team in time. Remember, not too long ago this was a Sox town, and it wasn't even an issue.

Fenway
01-23-2006, 02:09 PM
But Cub fans are an interesting bunch, and most will turn on their team in time. Remember, not too long ago this was a Sox town, and it wasn't even an issue.

There is no question the mood of Cubs fans has gotten very, very dark. Seeing the Red Sox win gave them hope but never in a zillion years did they even consider the White Sox winning it all.

Now they see their beloved bleachers destroyed and when they look up at the roof in the grandstand they will still see nets to catch the falling concrete.

I think it may get very ugly up at 1060 West if the Flubs falter early in 2006.

Ol' No. 2
01-23-2006, 02:21 PM
Oh, goody. Can we talk about attendance next?:rolleyes:

Rocky Soprano
01-23-2006, 02:25 PM
Tinfoil hat must be on at all times while reading this thread.

Hangar18
01-23-2006, 02:37 PM
If it ever was 70-30, you can be sure that right now, were probably 50-50
Thats why it was VERY VERY IMPORTANT the SOX continued to be aggressive in putting another good team out there. If the SOX can win big again this year, wow will those numbers swing our way.

Uncle_Patrick
01-23-2006, 02:39 PM
I think that the numbers of passionate, die hard fans is very similiar between the two teams. In recent times, the Cubs have had the corner on the bandwagoneers, hipsters, and casual fans. Undoubtedly, some of these people will (or have already started to) lean towards the White Sox because of the World Series victory. Should the Sox keep up a run of at least playoff bound baseball over the next few years, the Sox will continue to attract more of these types, especially if the Cubs continue to be mediocre. Should the Cubs make the playoffs or even the World Series, those people will flock back to the Northside. Frankly, its too early to start considering Chicago a "Sox Town". If the Sox were to somehow blow it in 2006 (which I doubt), we'd be back to the way things were before 2005, even if the Cubs are bad.

1951Campbell
01-23-2006, 02:39 PM
There is no question the mood of Cubs fans has gotten very, very dark...I think it may get very ugly up at 1060 West if the Flubs falter early in 2006.

There's gonna be a "fan incident" this year at Wrigley. Book it.

mjharrison72
01-23-2006, 02:41 PM
I think what will be more interesting is 15-20 years down the road, when the kids who finally got to experience a World Series champion in Chicago develop into an entire generation of Sox fans. They will have much less interest in the flubs, because who would root for that losing team when you can root for the champions!

Dan Mega
01-23-2006, 02:42 PM
:boston
"Well, ummm, uh, lets just keep in mind that, ummm, uhhhh...."

Baby Fisk
01-23-2006, 02:50 PM
I think what will be more interesting is 15-20 years down the road, when the kids who finally got to experience a World Series champion in Chicago develop into an entire generation of Sox fans. They will have much less interest in the flubs, because who would root for that losing team when you can root for the champions!
Even if neither team wins the WS again for many years (:duck: ), those kids who followed or were at least aware of the 2005 Sox will carry those memories with them over the decades. The Cubs can have millions of "fans", but none of them have gotten to experience what we all did on 10/26/05. Nothing else matters.

BTW, JoeItalia::welcome:

Max Power
01-23-2006, 02:50 PM
Evanston is one of the Cubs' stronghold, but these days I'm seeing a good amount of Sox stuff around town and at NU games. I would say the Cubs use to own Evanston by a 90/10 margin, but these days it's in the 65/35 range. Granted, it's harder to tell people's allegiance during the winter. But based on this there's no chance that it's 75/25 for Chicagoland as areas that were more evenly distributed than Evanston have certainly swung even further to the Sox.

JoeItalia7
01-23-2006, 03:41 PM
I think that the numbers of passionate, die hard fans is very similiar between the two teams.

Exactly! Thats the thing with both teams. Theres the die hards and the ones who jump from team to team based on what they do. Theres also that 3rd group who just goes to the park to drink and act off

tick53
01-23-2006, 03:42 PM
:deadhorse: As long as busses run from Iowa* to Chicago,
you'll have people visiting Piggly Field. The majority of these folks are don't
have a clue about baseball or Chicago. The believe Sox Park is located in the
Chicago equivalent of Hells Kitchen. That has a lot to do with the attendance
there.

After the Sox do it again this year, maybe people will know the truth.
WE DO...

*= Iowa, Indiana and parts of other bordering states.

I want Mags back
01-23-2006, 03:53 PM
75-25 50-30-20, hey theres only 2 numbers that matter

2005-1908

MarySwiss
01-23-2006, 03:55 PM
I think that the numbers of passionate, die hard fans is very similiar between the two teams. In recent times, the Cubs have had the corner on the bandwagoneers, hipsters, and casual fans. Undoubtedly, some of these people will (or have already started to) lean towards the White Sox because of the World Series victory. Should the Sox keep up a run of at least playoff bound baseball over the next few years, the Sox will continue to attract more of these types, especially if the Cubs continue to be mediocre. Should the Cubs make the playoffs or even the World Series, those people will flock back to the Northside. Frankly, its too early to start considering Chicago a "Sox Town". If the Sox were to somehow blow it in 2006 (which I doubt), we'd be back to the way things were before 2005, even if the Cubs are bad.

These are excellent points. We also need to look at the Cubs "fans" across the country who are only fans because of all the "WGN Superstation/lovable losers" crap, and who don't have an actual clue. I see a lot of that out here in Arizona.

RedHeadPaleHoser
01-23-2006, 05:01 PM
There is no question the mood of Cubs fans has gotten very, very dark. Seeing the Red Sox win gave them hope but never in a zillion years did they even consider the White Sox winning it all.

Now they see their beloved bleachers destroyed and when they look up at the roof in the grandstand they will still see nets to catch the falling concrete.

I think it may get very ugly up at 1060 West WHEN the Flubs falter early in 2006.

Sorry fenway, had to be done.

thomas35forever
01-23-2006, 05:49 PM
Whoever "conducted" that survey must have just loomed around the border of Wrigleyville and mostly picked people wearing Cubby blue.

CanBuehrleWait
01-23-2006, 06:21 PM
I think what will be more interesting is 15-20 years down the road, when the kids who finally got to experience a World Series champion in Chicago develop into an entire generation of Sox fans. They will have much less interest in the flubs, because who would root for that losing team when you can root for the champions!

I agree 100%. I'm sure there's a lot of 20's somethings like myself who are Sox fans because of those early 90's Sox teams that were winning while the Cubs stunk. Frank Thomas and Bo Jackson didn't hurt either :smile: Nothing like a championship to snatch up a generation of fans for the good guys though.

Chisox003
01-23-2006, 06:25 PM
I agree 100%. I'm sure there's a lot of 20's somethings like myself who are Sox fans because of those early 90's Sox teams that were winning while the Cubs stunk. Frank Thomas and Bo Jackson didn't hurt either :smile: Nothing like a championship to snatch up a generation of fans for the good guys though.
*raises hand*

You got it. 1993, what a year.

Well that and my entire family is full of die-hard Sox fans...

So I was screwed either way

slavko
01-23-2006, 06:50 PM
There is no question the mood of Cubs fans has gotten very, very dark. Seeing the Red Sox win gave them hope but never in a zillion years did they even consider the White Sox winning it all.


I notice the same. The younger ones are still combative. The older ones, and I don't mean really old, just past the age where the beer and babes are more important than the baseball, are starting to get worried about another bleak century. They are full of criticism and despair as they manage to offer congratulations through clenched teeth.

I'm loving it.

TheOldRoman
01-23-2006, 06:56 PM
Whoever "conducted" that survey must have just loomed around the border of Wrigleyville and mostly picked people wearing Cubby blue.
I believe he is talking about the Final Word on Fox 32. The guest was Cubs... I mean, baseball insider George Offman. He said at the beginning of the year it was 80-20 or 75-25 for the Cubs, and everyone said "if one of these teams ever wins anything, it will all change". Well, nobody expected it would be the Sox to win (:rolleyes:), but their win changed things. The fanbase is around 60-40 for the Cubs.
Jag Offman just had to close the segment by saying "but if the Cubs make the playoffs this year, everything will go back to normal." (double:rolleyes:)

TomBradley72
01-23-2006, 07:05 PM
About 120 professional sports franchises across the four major team sports...only one in that entire universe hangs its hat on "we're more popular and our stadium is old and really pretty". They can have it.

I'll take the World Series championship and a group of fans that truly know and love the game.

Hitmen77
01-23-2006, 09:25 PM
About 120 professional sports franchises across the four major team sports...only one in that entire universe hangs its hat on "we're more popular, our team always loses, and our stadium is old and really pretty". They can have it.

I'll take the World Series championship and a group of fans that truly know and love the game.

One more addition in bold.

I think the Sox winning the World Series has opened some people's eyes as to the absurdity of rooting for the Cubs because they are "lovable losers".

DSpivack
01-23-2006, 09:49 PM
Evanston is one of the Cubs' stronghold, but these days I'm seeing a good amount of Sox stuff around town and at NU games. I would say the Cubs use to own Evanston by a 90/10 margin, but these days it's in the 65/35 range. Granted, it's harder to tell people's allegiance during the winter. But based on this there's no chance that it's 75/25 for Chicagoland as areas that were more evenly distributed than Evanston have certainly swung even further to the Sox.

I don't know if it was ever that bad. That or I was just unique in high school; more of my friends were Sox fans than Cub fans. That said, that's among people who were die hard sports fans, not among the casual sports watcher. In 2003, I certainly got called plenty of names. Still, I'd say 75-25, but arguing numbers either way is frivolous without hard data. But I certainly was not alone in my Soxdom in E-town. Also, go to a Sox game in the summer on a sunday; plenty of Orthodox Jews, presumably from Skokie or Lincolnwood or Rogers Park, are present.

Tragg
01-23-2006, 09:53 PM
I'll tell yall who cares. Kenny Williams cares. He's the one who's been talking about it.

Phil A. Show
01-24-2006, 11:00 AM
I was watching the news last night on fox and they were talking about Chicago turning to a sox town. The special guest on there said he believes that Chicago is 75-25%, that being cubs fans to sox fans. I dont believe that, there is no way 75% of chicago are cubs fans, and only 25% are sox. Maybe before all the bandwagoners jumped on this year id say a little more cubs than sox, but 75-25 is a lie. Look at the world series parade, almost 2 million, need i say more?

You think a parade during lunch hour on a workday is a good measure? Maybe if it was on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon.

Max Power
01-24-2006, 11:01 AM
I don't know if it was ever that bad. That or I was just unique in high school; more of my friends were Sox fans than Cub fans. That said, that's among people who were die hard sports fans, not among the casual sports watcher. In 2003, I certainly got called plenty of names. Still, I'd say 75-25, but arguing numbers either way is frivolous without hard data. But I certainly was not alone in my Soxdom in E-town. Also, go to a Sox game in the summer on a sunday; plenty of Orthodox Jews, presumably from Skokie or Lincolnwood or Rogers Park, are present.

I guess it all depends on who you know. Almost all of my friends from high school (I went to Loyola) are Cubs fans and I work at NU, where most people are Cubs fans- though I've been seeing a lot more Sox stuff on campus. I think 2003, when everyone in Evanston jumped on the Cubs bandwagon influenced my 90-10 estimate. Things are definitely going toward the Sox now.

Chisox1500
01-24-2006, 11:21 AM
The White Sox now have a national identity. They are no longer an after thought. I've seem Sox gear all over the country in Orlando, Florida or even Columbia, Missouri. I've never seen Sox gear outside of Chicago in the previous five.

With digital cable and the Internet, the Cubs' past advantage of being on the superstation is all but wiped out. It can be a Sox town if they keep on winning. That's something to hold onto, especially since things seemed so bleak in early October 2003. What a miraculous turn around.

Uncle_Patrick
01-24-2006, 11:21 AM
One more addition in bold.

I think the Sox winning the World Series has opened some people's eyes as to the absurdity of rooting for the Cubs because they are "lovable losers".

Also, you are going to have a lot of little kids just getting into baseball who have had a World Series winning team right in their own backyard. Its going to leave a definite impression on these kids growing up.

Sometime in the summer, there was a little kid, problably 9 or 10, in a Cubs shirt who caught a White Sox home run ball (I think it was a game winner) and it was right there on TV for everyone to see. I remember watching that and thinking "There's a future Sox fan right there." Losing because less lovable when a winner is playing in the same city.

Lip Man 1
01-24-2006, 11:33 AM
Which is why it is so important for the next few years to actually keep this going. I don't mean that if the Sox don't win the series every year or at least get to it every year, the season is a failure.

What I mean is that the Sox have a realistic chance to make the post season for the next few years. If they can put together a run like during the mid 60's (three straight seasons with 93 or more wins in 63, 64 and 65) that will start to establish a generation of youngsters who have seen the Sox consistently put a good team out on the field.

It will 'make up' or balance out the generation that was lost to the Cubs due to the stupidity of SportsVision in the early 80's. (That and taking the team off Superstation WGN)

Lip

Fenway
01-24-2006, 11:36 AM
TV ratings the past few years did get as bad as 2 to 1 Flubs but it bottomed out at 66/33

Another factor here. A LOT of White Sox fans that walked away after the strike and white flag have returned after swearing that would never give JR another chance. They didn't become Flubs fans they stopped going and watching the Sox. Most of those people are back on board.

I know quite a few White Sox fans who frew up in places like Albany Park and Rogers Park. Their reason for becoming Sox fans was simple, the Sox played at night so they could listen to and watch games after school and then work.

PaulDrake
01-24-2006, 11:43 AM
I know quite a few White Sox fans who frew up in places like Albany Park and Rogers Park. Their reason for becoming Sox fans was simple, the Sox played at night so they could listen to and watch games after school and then work. Now you know one more. Like I've said before, in the go go era being a Sox fan in many N an NW side neighborhoods was not a lonely experience.

Hitmen77
01-24-2006, 12:47 PM
With digital cable and the Internet, the Cubs' past advantage of being on the superstation is all but wiped out. It can be a Sox town if they keep on winning. That's something to hold onto, especially since things seemed so bleak in early October 2003. What a miraculous turn around.

I agree that the WGN advantage for the Cubs isn't nearly what it used to be with Regional sports networks, Extra Innings, Internet, XM radio, etc. Plus the Cubs have less games on WGN than before and the Sox have about a game a week on WGN. If the Sox keep winning, they can do more than just grab a bigger chuck of the Chicago market, they can keep it too.

Which is why it is so important for the next few years to actually keep this going. I don't mean that if the Sox don't win the series every year or at least get to it every year, the season is a failure. What I mean is that the Sox have a realistic chance to make the post season for the next few years. If they can put together a run like during the mid 60's (three straight seasons with 93 or more wins in 63, 64 and 65) that will start to establish a generation of youngsters who have seen the Sox consistently put a good team out on the field.

I think a recent example of this is the Angels. They were suffering the 2nd-team syndrome before winning the World Series in 2002. That win turned them into a large market powerhouse franchise. They haven't been back to the Series since then, but they've been a great team and have made the playoffs and that has been enough to sustain their post-championship bounce.

Hitmen77
01-24-2006, 01:01 PM
Another factor here. A LOT of White Sox fans that walked away after the strike and white flag have returned after swearing that would never give JR another chance. They didn't become Flubs fans they stopped going and watching the Sox. Most of those people are back on board.

Yep, those past blunders are ancient history now. In addition, I believe that two other factors that have kept fans away in the past - dislike of New Comiskey and concern over the park's neighborhood - are either greatly reduced or going away.

The ballpark renovations have been a huge success. People coming back to the park after a long absence (or for the 1st time) are going to be impressed at how nice the park looks now and will want to come back. Also, they'll see that the neighborhood has improved - lots of renovations in Bridgeport, the projects across the Ryan are gone, etc.

rdivaldi
01-25-2006, 12:41 AM
Another factor here. A LOT of White Sox fans that walked away after the strike and white flag have returned after swearing that would never give JR another chance.

Along those lines, is anyone here someone who abandoned the team in '94 and came back? I've always thought that a World Series championship would win back a large portion of fans that disappeared after the strike, but I have yet to meet anyone who follows that pattern.

CPditka
01-25-2006, 01:30 AM
Haha there is no way. That # might hold up if you ask Iowa or Indiana. Fact is the sox are IN. I traveled to Bozeman, Montana over break to ski and flying from Chicago to Denver to Bozeman I saw probably 10x more sox gear than cubs gear. I remember seeing the airport in bozeman and watching people get off the plane and like half the young men had some sort of sox gear on. In the denver airport all the flights to chicago the people had way way more sox gear than cubs, a lot of championship gear. It was apparent the influx of people to and from chicago is a majority sox represented at this point. Just go to the airport you will see.

Realist
01-25-2006, 03:22 AM
I think the pendulum has swung toward the Sox in bigger way than most people realize. The Cell is gonna be a madhouse this year. :smile:

JoeItalia7
01-25-2006, 08:58 AM
You think a parade during lunch hour on a workday is a good measure? Maybe if it was on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon.

If it was on a saturday or sunday i have no doubt they would have had a larger turnout. Pretty much everyone i knew couldnt go because they had work or school. i know they would have been there if they could have. i doubt that just stops at the people i know

Phil A. Show
01-25-2006, 10:46 AM
If it was on a saturday or sunday i have no doubt they would have had a larger turnout. Pretty much everyone i knew couldnt go because they had work or school. i know they would have been there if they could have. i doubt that just stops at the people i know

My point is you can't really assume everybody who witnessed the parade is a Sox fan. Millions of people pour into downtown from all over (incl. Wis. and Indiana) to work. During lunch it's already crowded. I remember watching John Mellencamp play at Daley Plaza during lunch in 2000. I'm not a fan of his music and it's difficult to say the thousands there were fans because it was a free concert. Sox management were smart to have it on a weekday to ensure a large turnout. It would have been nice to have it on a weekend that way we would know the people there were only there for the Sox and not to "people watch". But I guess we'll never really know. We can only assume because we all know 2 people who couldn't make it.

Cat Thief
01-25-2006, 11:22 AM
My point is you can't really assume everybody who witnessed the parade is a Sox fan. Millions of people pour into downtown from all over (incl. Wis. and Indiana) to work. During lunch it's already crowded. I remember watching John Mellencamp play at Daley Plaza during lunch in 2000. I'm not a fan of his music and it's difficult to say the thousands there were fans because it was a free concert. Sox management were smart to have it on a weekday to ensure a large turnout. It would have been nice to have it on a weekend that way we would know the people there were only there for the Sox and not to "people watch". But I guess we'll never really know. We can only assume because we all know 2 people who couldn't make it.

People were decked out in Sox attire that day along with signs and banners. I do not believe there were many "people watchers" there. If you were there you would understand what I am talking about. Also, do you happen to remember the thousands along the parade route?
Secondly, the Sox were going to delay the festivities, but many of the players wanted to get home to their families. This was well known while the festivities were being planned, it had nothing to do with the White Sox being smart.
Don't try and put a damper on that day saying that the workers downtown made up the majority of the crowd. That's just plain bull****.

soxfanatlanta
01-25-2006, 11:25 AM
Strange that any Sox fan would give a hoo haw. But has there been any kind of survey by The Cubune/Sun Times/Daily Southtown/<insert name here>? I'm curious.

Phil A. Show
01-25-2006, 11:52 AM
People were decked out in Sox attire that day along with signs and banners. I do not believe there were many "people watchers" there. If you were there you would understand what I am talking about. Also, do you happen to remember the thousands along the parade route?
Secondly, the Sox were going to delay the festivities, but many of the players wanted to get home to their families. This was well known while the festivities were being planned, it had nothing to do with the White Sox being smart.
Don't try and put a damper on that day saying that the workers downtown made up the majority of the crowd. That's just plain bull****.

I'm not putting a damper on the event. It was great. But given the factors I can't make any guesses based on the crowd that attended. There really isn't any good measure of how the city is split. When a guy comes out saying 75% -25% Cubs to Sox, how did he come up with that number? Attendance? Most of those people that go to Wrigley aren't even baseball fans. There might be more Sox fans than Cub fans. But unless someone actually conducted an impartial survey it will be very difficult to conclude. A weekend parade would've said a lot. Peace

SOXintheBURGH
01-25-2006, 12:07 PM
It's been pretty accepted that the number of legitimate baseball fans than follow the Cubs vs legitimate baseball fans that follow the Sox is pretty damned even. Plenty, I mean LOTS,of people that don't really care either way will go to a game just for something to do. More of those people go to the Urinal. Who gives a ****? Now that we're World Champions more of those people will come to the Cell.

Fenway
01-25-2006, 12:23 PM
New York is considered a Yankees town, but from 1982-1993 the Mets owned New York and there were plenty of seats in Yankee Stadium. During the 200 World Series you saw just as many Mets hats as Yankees hats.

The other 2 team markets are more regionally split. You don't see too many A's fans in San Francisco and Giant fans in Oakland. In LA the teams are 40 miles apart.

JoeItalia7
01-25-2006, 01:43 PM
My point is you can't really assume everybody who witnessed the parade is a Sox fan. Millions of people pour into downtown from all over (incl. Wis. and Indiana) to work. During lunch it's already crowded. I remember watching John Mellencamp play at Daley Plaza during lunch in 2000. I'm not a fan of his music and it's difficult to say the thousands there were fans because it was a free concert. Sox management were smart to have it on a weekday to ensure a large turnout. It would have been nice to have it on a weekend that way we would know the people there were only there for the Sox and not to "people watch". But I guess we'll never really know. We can only assume because we all know 2 people who couldn't make it.

Well then i guess you cant assume that every person that goes to a cubs game is a cubs fan. Its just a big bar

Phil A. Show
01-25-2006, 02:19 PM
Well then i guess you cant assume that every person that goes to a cubs game is a cubs fan. Its just a big bar

yes, I just said that.

pinwheels3530
01-25-2006, 02:20 PM
New York is considered a Yankees town, but from 1982-1993 the Mets owned New York and there were plenty of seats in Yankee Stadium. During the 200 World Series you saw just as many Mets hats as Yankees hats.

The other 2 team markets are more regionally split. You don't see too many A's fans in San Francisco and Giant fans in Oakland. In LA the teams are 40 miles apart.


Your right everyone in NY loved the Mets in the 80"s and Yankee staduim was a ghost town.

pinwheels3530
01-25-2006, 02:25 PM
New York is considered a Yankees town, but from 1982-1993 the Mets owned New York and there were plenty of seats in Yankee Stadium. During the 200 World Series you saw just as many Mets hats as Yankees hats.

The other 2 team markets are more regionally split. You don't see too many A's fans in San Francisco and Giant fans in Oakland. In LA the teams are 40 miles apart.

In fact wasn't the BOSS complaining that he needed to move the Yankees out of the Bronx because of the perception that it was a dangerous place to watch a game. Then the Yankees started winning and the Yankees took NY back.

Hangar18
01-25-2006, 02:48 PM
These are excellent points. We also need to look at the Cubs "fans" across the country who are only fans because of all the "WGN Superstation/lovable losers" crap, and who don't have an actual clue. I see a lot of that out here in Arizona.


Excellent Point. This is something IM surprised not a single media outlet has talked about. The Cubs have this alleged huge fan base, but thats because they are owned by a Media Gorilla which is represented in a majority of the US Markets. The White Sox? They simply have rabid fans everywhere WITHOUT the hype. Without the hoopla. Without the Propaganda. Without WGN. Without the 80% slanted media coverage.
Think about it. With all the hype and biased coverage that team gets, THERE ARE STILL TONS OF WHITE SOX FANS ALL OVER THE US.
To me, THATS AMAZING. We are the Real Die-Hards in baseball

dickallen15
01-25-2006, 03:17 PM
Excellent Point. This is something IM surprised not a single media outlet has talked about. The Cubs have this alleged huge fan base, but thats because they are owned by a Media Gorilla which is represented in a majority of the US Markets. The White Sox? They simply have rabid fans everywhere WITHOUT the hype. Without the hoopla. Without the Propaganda. Without WGN. Without the 80% slanted media coverage.
Think about it. With all the hype and biased coverage that team gets, THERE ARE STILL TONS OF WHITE SOX FANS ALL OVER THE US.
To me, THATS AMAZING. We are the Real Die-Hards in baseball

That's true. I do think, however, you will see a lot more idiots that have no idea they are playing a baseball game in the stands of USCF this season. The funny thing is the Sox could have had the same hype the Cubs had if they had not pulled their games off WGN many years ago. They probably would have been even bigger considering they almost always have a better team.

Hangar18
01-25-2006, 04:00 PM
I'm not putting a damper on the event. It was great. But given the factors I can't make any guesses based on the crowd that attended. There really isn't any good measure of how the city is split. When a guy comes out saying 75% -25% Cubs to Sox, how did he come up with that number? Attendance? ................ A weekend parade would've said a lot. Peace

I was there. EVERYONE wore SOX stuff. Not a single person wore cub stuff ..........

Hitmen77
01-25-2006, 08:47 PM
That's true. I do think, however, you will see a lot more idiots that have no idea they are playing a baseball game in the stands of USCF this season. The funny thing is the Sox could have had the same hype the Cubs had if they had not pulled their games off WGN many years ago. They probably would have been even bigger considering they almost always have a better team.

There will be some of that, but it won't be nearly as bad as Wrigley. Remember, there is a big differnece between fans showing up because a team is a winner and fans showing up because there are bars near the ballpark.

maurice
01-25-2006, 09:05 PM
I was there. EVERYONE wore SOX stuff. Not a single person wore cub stuff ..........

The cub fans were all up in the office towers, hiding in their cubicles.

JoeItalia7
01-25-2006, 09:50 PM
The cub fans were all up in the office towers, hiding in their cubicles.

Thats not possible,they dont have jobs!

soxinem1
01-25-2006, 09:51 PM
The cub fans were all up in the office towers, hiding in their cubicles.

They would not have dared show up. Some of our 'Violent White Sox Fans' made up cubune headlines would have come true!!! Could you imagine if some idiot cub fan wearing cubbie blue yelling 'cubs rule' would have been at our parade. They would have been massacred!!!