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ws05champs
01-19-2006, 07:33 PM
The related thread about "Why "Sox" and not "Socks"" reminded me of an issue I have.

When referring to an individual player what is the correct form of address? I have always believed that it should be something like: "member of the White Sox" or "White Sox player" yet you often hear sports announcers say "White Sock."

Since they are the "Sox" and not the "Socks" it really grates at me when I hear somebody refer to an individual player as a "White Sock."

Anybody know the answer?

longshot7
01-19-2006, 07:44 PM
You're right. "Sox" is the team name, and even though it's a plural word, there is no singular form of the word. Generally, when referring to a member of the team, it's best to add the position after the team name i.e. "Chicago White Sox first baseman Paul Konerko". Although "Chicago White Sox Paul Konerko" should be acceptable as well the way "Atlanta Brave Chipper Jones" is.

whew.

batmanZoSo
01-19-2006, 08:44 PM
I say "White Sock" if I'm talking about one guy. S-O-X is the same as Socks, therefore it's plural and should be made singular in my opinion. I just like the way White Sock sounds, it's amusing.

To say, "Jim Thome is now a White Sox" to me is the same as saying "Orel Hershiser is no longer a Dodgers." Yeah, sounds pretty stupid.

RadioheadRocks
01-19-2006, 08:49 PM
How about: "Jim Thome of the White Sox"? Or "White Sox designated hitter Jim Thome"? Either of these are preferable to calling one of our players a "WHITE SOCK", which ranks right up there with nails on a chalkboard when it comes to annoyances.

longshot7
01-19-2006, 09:26 PM
I say "White Sock" if I'm talking about one guy. S-O-X is the same as Socks, therefore it's plural and should be made singular in my opinion. I just like the way White Sock sounds, it's amusing.

To say, "Jim Thome is now a White Sox" to me is the same as saying "Orel Hershiser is no longer a Dodgers." Yeah, sounds pretty stupid.

"White Sock" is incorrect. Sox is the team name, not Socks - and while Socks has a singular form, Sox does not. "Jim Thome is now a White Sox player" is probably the more correct way of saying that sentence.

BV2005
01-19-2006, 11:03 PM
how about White Soxian, like calling people from Chicago Chicagoans.

BNLSox
01-19-2006, 11:08 PM
I prefer World Champion Paul Konerko to White Sox Paul Konerko....

Am I alone on this :redneck :tongue:

JGarlandrules20
01-19-2006, 11:28 PM
:?:
Spring training come soon!

Tragg
01-19-2006, 11:43 PM
I use Sox for singular and plural.

There's no word "sox" anyway. Plural of sock is sockss. So a player can't be a sock.

FarWestChicago
01-20-2006, 12:26 AM
How about: "Jim Thome of the White Sox"? Or "White Sox designated hitter Jim Thome"? Either of these are preferable to calling one of our players a "WHITE SOCK", which ranks right up there with nails on a chalkboard when it comes to annoyances.:chimp

I always loved saying "White Sock player".

Norberto7
01-20-2006, 12:31 AM
The reverse is also interesting, i.e. team names with a singular but no plural.

I am a Miami Heat. I am a Utah Jazz. I am a Tampa Bay Lightning.

buehrle4cy05
01-20-2006, 01:27 AM
Hey! Are we talking about socks?
:windsock:
"LOOK AT ME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! LOOK AT ME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"

IlliniSox4Life
01-20-2006, 02:53 AM
The reverse is also interesting, i.e. team names with a singular but no plural.

I am a Miami Heat. I am a Utah Jazz. I am a Tampa Bay Lightning.
I think lightning is plural. You never say "Hey, there are lightnings out there!". The singular would probably be bolt of lightning, not just lightning.

IronFisk
01-20-2006, 02:56 AM
Dear Lord what have I started!?!? :o:

ArkanSox
01-20-2006, 03:20 AM
I can authoritatively say that it really doesn't make a rat's ass. :?:

doublem23
01-20-2006, 04:33 AM
:chimp

I always loved saying "White Sock player".

I'm glad someone brought this up. The assclown above is why I refuse to say "White Sock."

Jim Thome? He's on the Sox.

Deuce
01-20-2006, 07:32 AM
Dear Lord what have I started!?!? :o:That's it... since you bought that cowbell, you've been absolutely nuts. No more cowbell. I don't care if you have a fever or not.

Stoky44
01-20-2006, 11:10 AM
I think lightning is plural. You never say "Hey, there are lightnings out there!". The singular would probably be bolt of lightning, not just lightning.

Doc: "1.21 gigawatts.... How am I going to creat that much power? I can't. Marty I am afraid you are stuck hear."
Marty:"Stuck here? I can't be stuck here, I got a girl."
Doc: "Is she pretty?"
Marty:"Yeah, she's beautiful. She's crazy about me. Look what she worte. That says it all."
Doc:"The only thing that can create that much power is a bolt of lighting."
Marty: "What did you say?"
Doc: "A bolt of lighting, unfortunately you never know when or where it is going to strike."
Marty:"We do now!"
Doc rips flier away from Marty.
Doc:"This is it, this is it. According to this flier a bolt of lighting hits the clock tower at exactly 10:04pm this Saturday night!"



I know, I am a dork. Just thought of the movie with all this "bolt of lighting talk."

tebman
01-20-2006, 12:35 PM
I can authoritatively say that it really doesn't make a rat's ass. :?:

How does one make a rat's ass? :?:

MarySwiss
01-20-2006, 12:43 PM
I don't think I've ever said "Sox" when referring to a single player--and I know damn well I've never said "Sock."

It just seems more natural to me to say something like "Sox player Mark Buehrle" or "the Sox's Paul Konerko."

Huisj
01-20-2006, 01:01 PM
I use Sox for singular and plural.

There's no word "sox" anyway. Plural of sock is sockss. So a player can't be a sock.

I've always gone with this too, using Sox for both. I've always thought of it like the word fish. You can go catch some fish, and when you're done, you can eat a fish. Same word, works for both.

alohafri
01-20-2006, 03:58 PM
I say "White Sock" if I'm talking about one guy. S-O-X is the same as Socks, therefore it's plural and should be made singular in my opinion. I just like the way White Sock sounds, it's amusing.

To say, "Jim Thome is now a White Sox" to me is the same as saying "Orel Hershiser is no longer a Dodgers." Yeah, sounds pretty stupid.

"You say tomato, and I say tomahto..."

mjharrison72
01-20-2006, 04:32 PM
How about: "Jim Thome of the White Sox"? Or "White Sox designated hitter Jim Thome"? Either of these are preferable to calling one of our players a "WHITE SOCK", which ranks right up there with nails on a chalkboard when it comes to annoyances.
I agree these are preferable, though I suspect I don't get quite so annoyed as you. :cool:

SOXintheBURGH
01-20-2006, 04:35 PM
"I will always be a White Sox." - Robin Ventura

drftnaway
01-20-2006, 05:54 PM
There is nothing wrong with White Sock. The name White Sox is a nothing more than a shorthand way of writing White Stockings which was the original name. The logo is a white sock! Just because some don't like the sound doesn't mean it's wrong.

nlentz88
01-20-2006, 06:16 PM
Here's my $0.02.

White Sox is plural. Sox is a shorthand way of writing socks which itself is a shortened version of stockings. All plural. This is all fine and good when we're using the terms "White Sox" or "Sox" to describe the entire franchise, team, or to describe an element thereof, e.g White Sox training camp.

The trouble only arises when one wants to use the term to describe an individual player. This is tempting because a member of the Yankees is called a Yankee, a member of the Dodgers is a Dodger, a member of the Cubs is a loser, and so forth.

But what is a member of the White Sox to be called? Calling him a White Sox sounds wrong to many, since Sox, as established above, is plural. You wouldn’t say Ichiro is a Mariners. But if we use the singular form, White Sock, it suggests that the team bats and fields nine individual socks. Is each player one sock? Don’t socks come in pairs? It’s all very confusing.

I earned my degree in English Lit., and when I hear a player referred to as a White Sox, I cringe. It just doesn’t sound right to me. The use of a plural noun in reference to a single player just doesn’t fit in my brain. But judging from the responses in this thread, calling a player a “White Sock” doesn’t sound right. I prefer the latter, but obviously many prefer the former. It seems as if we’re in pickle.

The solution? Someone email Brooks Boyer!

Huisj
01-20-2006, 06:22 PM
Maybe one guy is a White Stocking. Would that solve the problems?

SOXintheBURGH
01-20-2006, 06:52 PM
Here's my $0.02.

White Sox is plural. Sox is a shorthand way of writing socks which itself is a shortened version of stockings. All plural. This is all fine and good when we're using the terms "White Sox" or "Sox" to describe the entire franchise, team, or to describe an element thereof, e.g White Sox training camp.

The trouble only arises when one wants to use the term to describe an individual player. This is tempting because a member of the Yankees is called a Yankee, a member of the Dodgers is a Dodger, a member of the Cubs is a loser, and so forth.

But what is a member of the White Sox to be called? Calling him a White Sox sounds wrong to many, since Sox, as established above, is plural. You wouldn’t say Ichiro is a Mariners. But if we use the singular form, White Sock, it suggests that the team bats and fields nine individual socks. Is each player one sock? Don’t socks come in pairs? It’s all very confusing.

I earned my degree in English Lit., and when I hear a player referred to as a White Sox, I cringe. It just doesn’t sound right to me. The use of a plural noun in reference to a single player just doesn’t fit in my brain. But judging from the responses in this thread, calling a player a “White Sock” doesn’t sound right. I prefer the latter, but obviously many prefer the former. It seems as if we’re in pickle.

The solution? Someone email Brooks Boyer!

Maybe Sox is one of those words than are plural and singular depending on the context its used in, like "deer."

"Daver killed many deer last week."

"I hit a deer with my car today."

Wsoxmike59
01-20-2006, 07:26 PM
http://www.melaniesemporium.com/lamb_chop_doll.jpg (http://www.melaniesemporium.com/Lamb%20Chop.htm)

I started off as a White Sock....Then Sheri Lewis stuck her hand up my hiney, pasted on a couple fake eye lashes, painted my face and made a fortune calling me Lamb Chop!!!

Dolly
01-21-2006, 02:42 AM
How about: "Jim Thome of the White Sox"? Or "White Sox designated hitter Jim Thome"? Either of these are preferable to calling one of our players a "WHITE SOCK", which ranks right up there with nails on a chalkboard when it comes to annoyances.I agree. I have heard DJ referring to an individual player as a "White Sock" on more than one occasion too, and I find it very irritating.

Here's another question: When talking about a game, is the plural or singular form of the team name used? As in, "My sister was at the Bears-Panthers game last Sunday," or "My sister was at the Bear-Panther game last Sunday." I say plural, since she saw more than one Bear play more than one Panther.... however, my sister, who was at the game, says singular.

ws05champs
01-21-2006, 12:01 PM
I agree. I have heard DJ referring to an individual player as a "White Sock" on more than one occasion too, and I find it very irritating.

Here's another question: When talking about a game, is the plural or singular form of the team name used? As in, "My sister was at the Bears-Panthers game last Sunday," or "My sister was at the Bear-Panther game last Sunday." I say plural, since she saw more than one Bear play more than one Panther.... however, my sister, who was at the game, says singular.

Since the team is the Chicago Bears, Bears-Panthers game is correct.

Your comment about DJ is among the many reasons I am hoping that he will be gone soon (although it now looks like that will not happen). The majority who have posted feel "White Sock" is wrong. So how does a spokesman paid by the Sox keep getting it wrong?

From all the posts so far I think the best way to refer to an individual player (Konerko for example) is "World Series Champion Chicago White Sox firstbaseman Paul Konerko." It would be nice if MLB could force all media and baseball fans to refer to Sox players in this way.