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View Full Version : Why is there a need to tinker?


antitwins13
12-04-2005, 08:06 PM
All year Ozzie, Hawk, John and Ed, and the fans were ranting and raving about how well Iguchi played the two hole. He got on base, hit behind Podsednik to move him over, and wasn't a strike out machine. This formula helped to win the Sox a world championship, but it seems like I'm the only person who still has an "if it ain't broke don't fix it attitude."

:uribe:-I always have been and always will be a #9 hitter who strikes out too much.

ilsox7
12-04-2005, 08:10 PM
I believe the thinking is if you can get a guy in the 2 spot to do what Tad did, then we'd benefit from moving Tad into a more productive spot in the order. So, why not give it a try? That's what spring training is for.

SoxFan76
12-04-2005, 08:12 PM
All year Ozzie, Hawk, John and Ed, and the fans were ranting and raving about how well Iguchi played the two hole. He got on base, hit behind Podsednik to move him over, and wasn't a strike out machine. This formula helped to win the Sox a world championship, but it seems like I'm the only person who still has an "if it ain't broke don't fix it attitude."

:uribe:-I always have been and always will be a #9 hitter who strikes out too much.

If the Sox had one strikeout machine it would have to be Tadahito Iguchi. Not to take away from his rookie year accomplishments, but look at the numbers before making such statements. Uribe and Iguchi's numbers were quite similar, minus batting average. Uribe can get a bunt down and he has decent speed. I have no problem batting him 2nd, and if he can't handle the load you put Iguchi back in the 2nd spot. It's called options: most teams would kill to have such options.

TheOldRoman
12-04-2005, 08:15 PM
All year Ozzie, Hawk, John and Ed, and the fans were ranting and raving about how well Iguchi played the two hole. He got on base, hit behind Podsednik to move him over, and wasn't a strike out machine. This formula helped to win the Sox a world championship, but it seems like I'm the only person who still has an "if it ain't broke don't fix it attitude."

:uribe:-I always have been and always will be a #9 hitter who strikes out too much.
You do realize that Iguchi struck out 37 more times than Uribe, right?

ChiWhiteSox1337
12-04-2005, 08:16 PM
:?:
Uribe had moderate success outside of the #9 spot in 2004(he had nearly half of his at-bats in the #2 hole), and only struck out 96 times. I wouldn't mind trying it out in spring training.

antitwins13
12-04-2005, 08:17 PM
You do realize that Iguchi struck out 37 more times than Uribe, right?


Even if that is the case look what Iguchi can do as far as bat control, stealing bases, and laying down bunts. Uribe has one swing...his put it on the fundamentals deck swing.

TheVulture
12-04-2005, 08:31 PM
Uribe has one swing...his put it on the fundamentals deck swing.

I always thought the problem with Uribe was he had too many swings- give the guy a break though, he's only 25, and he's got a lot of talent. I wouldn't be surprised to see Uribe develop as a hitter and put up some strong numbers some time if the next few years.

ATXBMX
12-04-2005, 08:41 PM
Iguchi - 114 K
Uribe - 77 K

antitwins13
12-04-2005, 08:45 PM
Iguchi - 114 K
Uribe - 77 K


Iguchi also had 30 more AB's then Uribe. Keep that in mind. Also the number nine hitter gets more fastballs then the #2 hitter gets.

samram
12-04-2005, 08:50 PM
Iguchi also had 30 more AB's then Uribe. Keep that in mind. Also the number nine hitter gets more fastballs then the #2 hitter gets.

That's 30 more at-bats and 37 more Ks, so that's a moot point. Furthermore, Iguchi saw a lot of fastballs because of Podsednik's speed and Uribe saw a ton of breaking balls because he can't hit them.

That said, if the season started today, I think Iguchi would be in the second slot. I wouldn't be surprised if Uribe got a shot to hit second in spring training though.

ilsox7
12-04-2005, 08:50 PM
Iguchi also had 30 more AB's then Uribe. Keep that in mind. Also the number nine hitter gets more fastballs then the #2 hitter gets.

That doesn't necessarily account for the fact that Tad struck out 50% more than Juan did.

Frater Perdurabo
12-04-2005, 08:54 PM
Batting second, Iguchi had more at-bats than the #9 hitter.

Also, although they don't show up as sacrificies, many of Iguchi's Ks were "sacrifice strikeouts." That is, he deliberately didn't swing at fastballs down the middle because he didn't want to risk grounding to the shortstop or third baseman or worse, flying out, when Pods was running. Often, Iguchi only would get one pitch at which he "able" to swing because he'd have two called strikes against him. Try not striking out when you've already got two strikes against you. By sacrificing himself, which often resulted in a K, Iguchi did a superb job allowing Pods to put himself in scoring position.

While Uribe ought to be able to learn the self-discipline that makes a hitter better in the #2 spot, expect that in that role Uribe would strike out a lot more than he did in the #9 hole.

TDog
12-04-2005, 09:14 PM
The No. 2 hitter in the lineup has to take more pitches if the leadoff man is a base stealer who gets on base a lot. It's possible that imposing such discipline on Uribe, requiring him to take more pitches, would improve his offensive game. It might not, but it has worked that way for some hitters.

I don't think anyone can fail to see the Sox offense finished the season with room for improvement.

Lip Man 1
12-04-2005, 09:44 PM
If you aren't moving forward in sports, you're actually falling behind because other clubs are trying to move ahead.

Part of the reason is that 'change' makes all of those associated with the club from getting complacent.

Kenny isn't going to gut the club and start over, the changes he makes will be used to improve the team, give better depth and help the budget. So far he deserves the benfit of the doubt.

Lip