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CluelessJoe1919
11-27-2005, 02:04 PM
This is for the old-timers, mainly, since it's been a while since the greatest broadcasting duo have been together...

I was watching the first spring training game beemed back on television back in either 80 or 81 and the game was held on Easter Sunday. Harry never could stand RHP Bart Johnson and I think he and Jimmy teamed up for this gem...

Jimmy: Hey Harry, did you hear that they had an Easter egg hunting contest for the children of the players?

Harry: No, Jimmy. Who won?

Jimmy: Bart Johnson's daughter (whatever her name was).

Harry: Really? That's the first win he's had in a long time..

MarySwiss
11-27-2005, 02:57 PM
This is for the old-timers, mainly, since it's been a while since the greatest broadcasting duo have been together...

I was watching the first spring training game beemed back on television back in either 80 or 81 and the game was held on Easter Sunday. Harry never could stand RHP Bart Johnson and I think he and Jimmy teamed up for this gem...

Jimmy: Hey Harry, did you hear that they had an Easter egg hunting contest for the children of the players?

Harry: No, Jimmy. Who won?

Jimmy: Bart Johnson's daughter (whatever her name was).

Harry: Really? That's the first win he's had in a long time..

I can't remember any specifics, but IMO Harry was much more interesting when he was paired with Jimmy. The dialogue you quote above sounds like something out of a vaudeville cross-talk act! :D:

SoxFan76
11-27-2005, 03:05 PM
I never heard the 2 broadcast a game, but judging from Piersall's personality on the radio and judging from what I heard from Harry on Cubs games, I'm surprised those 2 egos didn't clash more. Were there a lot of conflicts between the 2? It just reminds me of putting Hawk and Vin Scully in the booth together--it just wouldn't work. But Harry and Jimmy made it work apparently.

TDog
11-27-2005, 03:10 PM
I remember when Piersall would complain about the lousy quality of play on the White Sox and Harry Caray would talk about how they played better baseball in the National League -- hence the frequent updates on the Cardinals games.

johnny_mostil
11-27-2005, 03:38 PM
I remember when Piersall would complain about the lousy quality of play on the White Sox and Harry Caray would talk about how they played better baseball in the National League -- hence the frequent updates on the Cardinals games.

I remember, after a nice defensive play, Jimmy telling us in a loud voice that Chet Lemon couldn't carry Rusty Kuntz' athletic supporter.

I also remember Jimmy denying he ever said that. But he did, and I clearly remember it.

Jimmy always thought Chet was a terrible outfielder. Chet wasn't, he was very good, but Jimmy was just Jimmy.

tebman
11-27-2005, 04:15 PM
I never heard the 2 broadcast a game, but judging from Piersall's personality on the radio and judging from what I heard from Harry on Cubs games, I'm surprised those 2 egos didn't clash more. Were there a lot of conflicts between the 2? It just reminds me of putting Hawk and Vin Scully in the booth together--it just wouldn't work. But Harry and Jimmy made it work apparently.
The pairing of Harry and Jimmy was one of Veeck's experiments that could've been a train wreck, but instead worked out very well. Veeck also tried Mary Shane in 1977 as a radio announcer, trying a gimmick as The First Female Baseball Announcer, but she was simply bad. A shame, too, because I know that a woman who is a good play-by-play announcer could do it. Veeck just picked the wrong one.

Piersall was absolutely green when he started, and he learned from Caray how to call the game, when to speak, when not to speak, timing, etc. It didn't take long before they really did become like a vaudeville act -- Piersall was given to emotional outbursts ("That's a TERRIBLE call! What a busher that umpire is!"), and Caray always spoke his mind when he was with the Sox ("He paaaaahhhpped it up again! C'mon, Chet! Let's play ball!"). They were truly hilarious when they got in a groove playing off each other about some aspect of the game.

Piersall was (and still is) an explosive character, and they would've probably had a serious clash if they'd stayed together longer than they did. But while they lasted they were a hell of a lot of fun.

Parrothead
11-27-2005, 04:19 PM
Paraphrasing my favorites:

Jimmy: Look at the way these guys are playing. My grandmother and her friends could beat them and they are dead !

Jimmy: Ballplayers wifes are whores.

MarySwiss
11-27-2005, 04:19 PM
The pairing of Harry and Jimmy was one of Veeck's experiments that could've been a train wreck, but instead worked out very well. Veeck also tried Mary Shane in 1977 as a radio announcer, trying a gimmick as The First Female Baseball Announcer, but she was simply bad. A shame, too, because I know that a woman who is a good play-by-play announcer could do it. Veeck just picked the wrong one.

Piersall was absolutely green when he started, and he learned from Caray how to call the game, when to speak, when not to speak, timing, etc. It didn't take long before they really did become like a vaudeville act -- Piersall was given to emotional outbursts ("That's a TERRIBLE call! What a busher that umpire is!"), and Caray always spoke his mind when he was with the Sox ("He paaaaahhhpped it up again! C'mon, Chet! Let's play ball!"). They were truly hilarious when they got in a groove playing off each other about some aspect of the game.

Piersall was (and still is) an explosive character, and they would've probably had a serious clash if they'd stayed together longer than they did. But while they lasted they were a hell of a lot of fun.

Well said, Tebman! And I was always sort of waiting for one or the other to lose it completely, but they never did. They complemented each other nicely.

IMO, Harry lost a lot of his edge when he moved north.

TDog
11-27-2005, 04:21 PM
I remember, after a nice defensive play, Jimmy telling us in a loud voice that Chet Lemon couldn't carry Rusty Kuntz' athletic supporter.

I also remember Jimmy denying he ever said that. But he did, and I clearly remember it.

Jimmy always thought Chet was a terrible outfielder. Chet wasn't, he was very good, but Jimmy was just Jimmy.

Chester Lemon, if memory serves, had more than 500 putouts in 1977. He was my favorite player on the Sox that season. Piersall constantly let listeners know that he didn't think Chet Lemon was very good at baseball, if anything.

Ask Carlos May or Bill Melton some time what they thought of Harry Caray. Ballplayers didn't like Piersall either. He even got into a physical altercation with a White Sox coach.

gaelhound
11-27-2005, 04:21 PM
I do not remember what city they were in but the "wires" were down and they had no updates from other games to fill the broadcast void. Jimmy attempts to refresh Harry's memory of a similar occurence.
Jimmy:" Harry, remember when we were in Toronto and couldn't get a score?"
Harry: "And we didn't meet any broads either!"
What followed was a half inning of silence.

TDog
11-27-2005, 04:25 PM
...
IMO, Harry lost a lot of his edge when he moved north.

Losing his edge was in his contract. Seriously.

The Cubs wanted to increase their fan base. Turning Harry Caray into a cuddly icon was necessary to reach that end.

FielderJones
11-27-2005, 05:16 PM
Ballplayers didn't like Piersall either. He even got into a physical altercation with a White Sox coach.

I thought he got into a physical altercation with Rob Gallas. I remember the postgame show where Harry and Jimmy would give the MLB scores as they were displayed on the screen. Instead, some clever WSNS engineer played Pink Floyd's Run Like Hell as the scores were displayed.

I have another memory of Piersall being particularly miffed what one of the Sox couldn't get a bunt down, and did a pathetic job of putting the bat on the ball. Jimmy grabs a broom and shows where your hands are supposed to positioned to make a good bunt.

Both very funny moments.

D. TODD
11-27-2005, 05:31 PM
I thought he got into a physical altercation with Rob Gallas. I remember the postgame show where Harry and Jimmy would give the MLB scores as they were displayed on the screen. Instead, some clever WSNS engineer played Pink Floyd's Run Like Hell as the scores were displayed.

I have another memory of Piersall being particulary miffed what one of the Sox couldn't get a bunt down, and did a pathetic job of putting the bat on the ball. Jimmy grabs a broom and shows where your hands are supposed to positioned to make a good bunt.

Both very funny moments. That is mine as well. Jimmy GOING OFF on the Sox inability to lay down a bunt. Then going on to say he could bunt with a broomstick, followed by a demonstration with a broom in the booth.

I also recall his comments about the Sox wifes on road trips, not a good memory. I recall alot of flack, rightfully so, from the players about that one.

MarySwiss
11-27-2005, 05:44 PM
That is mine as well. Jimmy GOING OFF on the Sox inability to lay down a bunt. Then going on to say he could bunt with a broomstick, followed by a demonstration with a broom in the booth.

I also recall his comments about the Sox wifes on road trips, not a good memory. I recall alot of flack, rightfully so, from the players about that one.

Yep. IIRC, his comments about the Sox's wives were not very nice. Don't recall exactly what he said, and I tried to get some source info from the 'Net but was unsuccessful. I do remember that my reaction was not favorable...and I was a big Piersall fan.

TornLabrum
11-27-2005, 05:44 PM
Paraphrasing my favorites:

Jimmy: Look at the way these guys are playing. My grandmother and her friends could beat them and they are dead !

Jimmy: Ballplayers wifes are whores.

That's not what he said (the latter). He said they were "a bunch of horny broads."

TornLabrum
11-27-2005, 05:48 PM
I thought he got into a physical altercation with Rob Gallas. I remember the postgame show where Harry and Jimmy would give the MLB scores as they were displayed on the screen. Instead, some clever WSNS engineer played Pink Floyd's Run Like Hell as the scores were displayed.

I have another memory of Piersall being particularly miffed what one of the Sox couldn't get a bunt down, and did a pathetic job of putting the bat on the ball. Jimmy grabs a broom and shows where your hands are supposed to positioned to make a good bunt.

Both very funny moments.

Piersall was angry at something Gallas wrote in (iirc) the Daily Herald about him. One thing led to another and Mike Veeck ended up having to remove Piersall's hands from around Gallas's neck. There are some who years later wished that Piersall had finished the job.

robertks61
11-27-2005, 05:51 PM
Was it Jimmy that called Tony LaRussa a "minor league punk manager"? Or was that someone else?

slavko
11-27-2005, 06:04 PM
Losing his edge was in his contract. Seriously.

The Cubs wanted to increase their fan base. Turning Harry Caray into a cuddly icon was necessary to reach that end.

Accurate. The Trib said so openly in stories after his death.

veeter
11-27-2005, 06:20 PM
I think the two became very good friends. If my memory is correct, Harry really helped Jimmy through a tough time in his personal life. Jimmy spoke of it in a book he wrote.

RadioheadRocks
11-27-2005, 06:58 PM
Yep. IIRC, his comments about the Sox's wives were not very nice. Don't recall exactly what he said, and I tried to get some source info from the 'Net but was unsuccessful. I do remember that my reaction was not favorable...and I was a big Piersall fan.

I believe the direct quotes can be found in one of Rich Lindberg's books on the White Sox (most likely WHO'S ON THIRD?). The quote actually came not from a Sox telecast, but a panel show that Harry and Jimmy appeared on, with Mike Royko (I'm pretty sure) as the moderator.

Viva Medias B's
11-27-2005, 07:17 PM
Is it true or urban legend that Harry was doing a Sox game in hot Kansas City or Texas one day and, after a cold Falstaff (or two...or three...), said this:

"It's so hot the third baseman is Melton."

soxfan1965
11-27-2005, 07:38 PM
Piersall was absolutely green when he started, and he learned from Caray how to call the game, when to speak, when not to speak, timing, etc. It didn't take long before they really did become like a vaudeville act -- Piersall was given to emotional outbursts ("That's a TERRIBLE call! What a busher that umpire is!"), and Caray always spoke his mind when he was with the Sox ("He paaaaahhhpped it up again! C'mon, Chet! Let's play ball!"). They were truly hilarious when they got in a groove playing off each other about some aspect of the game.

Piersall seemed very comfortable with Harry and called him "Coach", probably for the reasons above. He respected Harry. Sometimes Harry alluded to Piersall's mental background very tactfully (e.g. not mentioning the tantrum incident throwing bats, et al, onto the field) in a humorous way, referring to "Fear Strikes Out". Piersall was not offended and went with the flow. It was a good team while it lasted. Following the years of the low point 1970 season, and the very good but somewhat dull broadcasters like Bob Elson, Red Rush, Milo Hamilton, Jack Drees-- Harry and Jimmy pushed the envelope but they were a welcome change. I'm not sure if Falstaffs / Meister Brau's in the broadcast booth had an effect on their broadcasting, I'm sure someone else knows??

TornLabrum
11-27-2005, 07:48 PM
Piersall seemed very comfortable with Harry and called him "Coach", probably for the reasons above. He respected Harry. Sometimes Harry alluded to Piersall's mental background very tactfully (e.g. not mentioning the tantrum incident throwing bats, et al, onto the field) in a humorous way, referring to "Fear Strikes Out". Piersall was not offended and went with the flow. It was a good team while it lasted. Following the years of the low point 1970 season, and the very good but somewhat dull broadcasters like Bob Elson, Red Rush, Milo Hamilton, Jack Drees-- Harry and Jimmy pushed the envelope but they were a welcome change. I'm not sure if Falstaffs / Meister Brau's in the broadcast booth had an effect on their broadcasting, I'm sure someone else knows??

And sometimes Harry referred to Jimmy's mental condition not so tactfully. I remember him asking Piersall on more than one occasion when Piersall was particularly off the wall, "Did you take your pill today, Jimmy?"

robertks61
11-27-2005, 07:49 PM
I'm not sure if Falstaffs / Meister Brau's in the broadcast booth had an effect on their broadcasting, I'm sure someone else knows??

Throw Stroh's into the mix. My cousin and I were walking the concorse prior to a game one day and I had a Stroh's t-shirt on. Jimmy was walking by us and we each shook his (large) hand. He commented that Harry would like my shirt.

eurotrash35
11-27-2005, 07:55 PM
These guys were way before my time but I read this little article a few months ago and some of the things those guys said had me rolling.

http://whitesoxinteractive.com/History&Glory/FalstaffHarry.htm

eurotrash35
11-27-2005, 08:00 PM
"Hey coach, Soderholm looks like he's running the bases
with a piano strapped to his back. That's ter-r-r-ible!" :rolling:

It's really only funny when you say it with the Harry Caray voice.

nccwsfan
11-27-2005, 08:36 PM
Is it true or urban legend that Harry was doing a Sox game in hot Kansas City or Texas one day and, after a cold Falstaff (or two...or three...), said this:

"It's so hot the third baseman is Melton."

I've heard that one before too....I think this one is true. Not old enough to verify but I've read it from old HC quotes.

Lip Man 1
11-27-2005, 09:07 PM
There are some misconceptions and inaccuracies posted on this thread. May I suggest reading the following to clear them up:

http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/rwas/index.php?category=11&id=2852

Lip

flo-B-flo
11-27-2005, 09:44 PM
And sometimes Harry referred to Jimmy's mental condition not so tactfully. I remember him asking Piersall on more than one occasion when Piersall was particularly off the wall, "Did you take your pill today, Jimmy?" I can remember many times Harry said "and you got the papers to prove it". Piersall said that on the air sometimes.

RadioheadRocks
11-27-2005, 09:52 PM
flo-B-flo's quote speaks volumes: On Claudell Washington: Piersall:"Look at that swing." Harry:"You look at it I'm sick a lookin' at it"

flo-B-flo
11-27-2005, 11:25 PM
flo-B-flo's quote speaks volumes: On Claudell Washington: Piersall:"Look at that swing." Harry:"You look at it I'm sick a lookin' at it" As I recall Harry was eating somethng because he kinda croaked out his response. They had been REALLY down on Claudell for a while leading up to that.

The Critic
11-27-2005, 11:37 PM
Is it true or urban legend that Harry was doing a Sox game in hot Kansas City or Texas one day and, after a cold Falstaff (or two...or three...), said this:

"It's so hot the third baseman is Melton."

Yep, he said that - I remember hearing it, and that is my favorite Harry moment ever. So corny, but as a 9 or 10-year-old I thought it was funny.

FielderJones
11-27-2005, 11:49 PM
There are some misconceptions and inaccuracies posted on this thread. May I suggest reading the following to clear them up:

http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/rwas/index.php?category=11&id=2852


Yes, and he never elaborated about the confrontation with Gallas. As I remember and as TornLabrum has posted, didn't Jimmy try to choke him?

TDog
11-28-2005, 12:15 AM
Is it true or urban legend that Harry was doing a Sox game in hot Kansas City or Texas one day and, after a cold Falstaff (or two...or three...), said this:

"It's so hot the third baseman is Melton."

He said that during a Saturday afternoon with the Sox playing in Kansas City. It was later used as a featured quote in a Tribune feature about Harry Caray. It surprised me at the time, because Harry Caray made it clear that he hated Bill Melton. It sounded rather contrived at the time. I wondered who gave him the line.

More memorable for me was something the microphone picked up during a marathon game in Oakland in 1972. The game was suspended at 3 a.m. Chicago time, and the A's would win it on a Joe Rudi home run in the bottom of the 19th the next night. But during that summer night marathon, in the last summer before I had to go to work when school let out, I was there deep into the first night, when Harry Caray was coming out of a between-inning break to say:

"There must be something wrong with me. I've been drinking this stuff all night and I haven't had to go yet."

TDog
11-28-2005, 12:21 AM
I thought he got into a physical altercation with Rob Gallas. ...

I was referring to a different Piersall confrontation, one with a coach.

dickallen15
11-28-2005, 06:48 AM
Jimmy once told Harry he was crazy. Harry said " I'm crazy? You're crazy, and you have the papers to prove it."

Sox-on-TV44
11-28-2005, 10:42 AM
To me,I was (and still am) a die hard Harry and Jimmy fan.

Hell,if it wasn't for them,Ch 44 and WMAQ-AM would have been invisible during Sox games.They had a entertaing way of doing baseball games.In fact,someone has a tape of a Cubs/Phillies 1979 game,and I compare that to a Sox/A's early May game from that same year.NO COMPARSION!Brickhouse can put coffee to sleep!But Harry and Jimmy (Hell,even Lorn Brown!) made it more fun at the booth at Comiksey Park!

You can list all the moments the two of them did during their time together,and it's pure gold!

But one moment stood out from 1978 vs. the Angels at Comiskey on WMAQ.When the Halos changed pitchers,Nancy Fuast played "Rock Around The Clock" and Harry danced.Jimmy relpied,"As Harry dances along,...boy let me tell you folks,this is the funniest display of dancing i've ever seen!

And now,here he is.From St. Louis,the one,the only,the ol' timer (Harry shouted "What do you mean,old timer!!!"),Harry Caray!!!"

Dick Allen
11-28-2005, 11:52 AM
For a long time, Harry and Jimmy were the ONLY reason to tune into the game. The confrontation between Piersall and the coach, I believe, was when LaRussa and one of the coaches (don't recall who - Leyland? Duncan?) actually came to the radio studio and confronted him. Don't remember the details.

Lip Man 1
11-28-2005, 12:21 PM
Fielder:

Yes it was Gallas and it was Sox historian Rich Lindberg who was among the three folks who pulled Jimmy off him.

Lip

CluelessJoe1919
11-28-2005, 01:35 PM
I never heard the 2 broadcast a game, but judging from Piersall's personality on the radio and judging from what I heard from Harry on Cubs games, I'm surprised those 2 egos didn't clash more. Were there a lot of conflicts between the 2? It just reminds me of putting Hawk and Vin Scully in the booth together--it just wouldn't work. But Harry and Jimmy made it work apparently.It would seem that those two would clash often, but I don't remember them clashing even once.
Jimmy would say something outrageous and Harry would laugh heartily. And Sox fans loved it.

CluelessJoe1919
11-28-2005, 01:37 PM
Paraphrasing my favorites:

Jimmy: Look at the way these guys are playing. My grandmother and her friends could beat them and they are dead !

Jimmy: Ballplayers wifes are whores.I think he called players' wives "horny broads" on Mike Royko's show one time....He was either suspended or fired for that.

CluelessJoe1919
11-28-2005, 01:42 PM
Chester Lemon, if memory serves, had more than 500 putouts in 1977. He was my favorite player on the Sox that season. Piersall constantly let listeners know that he didn't think Chet Lemon was very good at baseball, if anything.

Ask Carlos May or Bill Melton some time what they thought of Harry Caray. Ballplayers didn't like Piersall either. He even got into a physical altercation with a White Sox coach.I totally agreed with Piersall's take on Chet Lemon, although Chet was a colorful player and had a great season during that exciting '77 season.
Do any of you remember the time Chet called timeout during a game? It resulted in an inside-the-park homer by Boston's Rick Burleson. I could have killed him.
IMO, Piersall was accurate in pointing out Chet's "false hustle", like when he would dive head first into first base.

CluelessJoe1919
11-28-2005, 01:45 PM
I thought he got into a physical altercation with Rob Gallas. I remember the postgame show where Harry and Jimmy would give the MLB scores as they were displayed on the screen. Instead, some clever WSNS engineer played Pink Floyd's Run Like Hell as the scores were displayed.

I have another memory of Piersall being particularly miffed what one of the Sox couldn't get a bunt down, and did a pathetic job of putting the bat on the ball. Jimmy grabs a broom and shows where your hands are supposed to positioned to make a good bunt.

Both very funny moments.If I remember right, he brought out the broom after he was forced into the studio to do post-game wrap ups. He came out from behind the desk in a sports coat and showed everyone how to bunt while he was wearing shorts and flip flops. It was hysterical.

CluelessJoe1919
11-28-2005, 01:50 PM
Piersall was angry at something Gallas wrote in (iirc) the Daily Herald about him. One thing led to another and Mike Veeck ended up having to remove Piersall's hands from around Gallas's neck. There are some who years later wished that Piersall had finished the job.
Even if Piersall was wrong on that (as he probably was), Gallas was chastised by Sox fans for fighting their beloved "Jimmy". So, Gallas had this great sarcastic quote: "I hope I didn't bruise Jimmy's fingers with my neck."

CluelessJoe1919
11-28-2005, 01:53 PM
And sometimes Harry referred to Jimmy's mental condition not so tactfully. I remember him asking Piersall on more than one occasion when Piersall was particularly off the wall, "Did you take your pill today, Jimmy?"They joked constantly about Piersall's past mental problems and Jimmy would always reply, "Harry, I'm sane and I have the papers to prove it."
The Sox games were a sideshow back then.

Fenway
11-28-2005, 01:58 PM
Another thing that got Jimmy in trouble was when he ripped Greg Luzinski after not running out a ball. Turns out Greg pulled a hamstring. Jimmy said in effect they should shoot him and called him a name that Archie Bunker would use :?:



I guess the call that sticks with Harry wemt something like this

"How could he lose the ball in the sun? He's Mexican!!!!"

CluelessJoe1919
11-28-2005, 02:00 PM
As I recall Harry was eating somethng because he kinda croaked out his response. They had been REALLY down on Claudell for a while leading up to that.Claudell Washington was a piece of Sox history that I'm surprised we don't hear more of more often, mainly cuz of the fans...
The Sox traded for Claudell, who had been a good young outfielder in the post-A's championship era and was crowded out of a position. He got to Chicago and clearly didn't want to play here....

One of the reasons I was always a Sox fan over a Cubs fan while I lived in Chicago was that Sox fans seemed to have brilliant senses of humor. Like the people in right field who would put up signs in the CLOSED right field section that said, "Claudell Washington fan club." And the fans that put up this banner: "Claudell Washington slept here."

CluelessJoe1919
11-28-2005, 02:04 PM
For a long time, Harry and Jimmy were the ONLY reason to tune into the game. The confrontation between Piersall and the coach, I believe, was when LaRussa and one of the coaches (don't recall who - Leyland? Duncan?) actually came to the radio studio and confronted him. Don't remember the details.If I remember correctly, the coach that Jimmy got into the altercation with was Jim Leylund.

tebman
11-28-2005, 03:15 PM
One of the reasons I was always a Sox fan over a Cubs fan while I lived in Chicago was that Sox fans seemed to have brilliant senses of humor. Like the people in right field who would put up signs in the CLOSED right field section that said, "Claudell Washington fan club." And the fans that put up this banner: "Claudell Washington slept here."
Layla, who posts here occasionally, has identified herself as one of the regulars among the "Sox Supporters" who sat in the left-field seats in the late 70s. They were the wittiest fans of any sport, not just baseball. Those banners, like "Claudell Slept Here" were hilarious and on the mark.

Layla had stories about how some of those signs came about. Here's hoping she posts again soon to tell us some more.

soxrme
11-28-2005, 03:39 PM
Claudell Washington was a piece of Sox history that I'm surprised we don't hear more of more often, mainly cuz of the fans...
The Sox traded for Claudell, who had been a good young outfielder in the post-A's championship era and was crowded out of a position. He got to Chicago and clearly didn't want to play here....

One of the reasons I was always a Sox fan over a Cubs fan while I lived in Chicago was that Sox fans seemed to have brilliant senses of humor. Like the people in right field who would put up signs in the CLOSED right field section that said, "Claudell Washington fan club." And the fans that put up this banner: "Claudell Washington slept here."
The Washington slept here banner was in my opinion the best of all time at any park. Harry and Jimmy both made sure it was pointed out. They were good together at first but I for one was glad to see them go. It was too much putdown of the team and players all the time. You had to get rid of both of them though.

Lip Man 1
11-28-2005, 04:10 PM
Fenway:

Rich King talks about this in his interview with WSI.

And for all the others wondering who the coach was, what did Mike Veeck and he fight about and so forth, read Jimmy's interview. He talks about all of it. I posted the link earlier in the thread. It will clear up a lot of your questions.

Lip

johnr1note
11-28-2005, 05:28 PM
If I remember right, he brought out the broom after he was forced into the studio to do post-game wrap ups. He came out from behind the desk in a sports coat and showed everyone how to bunt while he was wearing shorts and flip flops. It was hysterical.

IIRC, the player he was critical of was Ron Leflore, and Jimmy repeated often "Ron LeFlore couldn't bunt with a broom!" I recall the moment of him coming out during the postgame show, but i also seem to remember him doing an on-field demo in a pregame show as well. Time dims the details of the memory, but i will always chuckle over Jimmy showing us all how to bunt with a broom handle.

chisox77
11-28-2005, 07:10 PM
At the risk of offending many great Sox fans who have posted in this thread, I have to express that I never really liked Harry and Jimmy when they announced the games. While they were certainly truthful and colorful, there was a very strong negativity that came through. No owner in his or her right mind would ever pair these two, or anyone similar again, because it makes the announcers more of an attraction than the team. The result is a circus.

I vividly remember those mid to late 70s Sox teams, and (with '77 being the exception) they were hard to watch, for their play, and their uniforms. Yet I still went to Comiskey often with my brother, his friends, and many times my friends, because we love the White Sox. The circumstances made for a unique pairing (rebel owner with little money and resources, hiring a displaced icon from the Cardinals, and a loose canon), one that should never be repeated.

There were two reasons why some of the best ballplayers from those days never wanted to play for the White Sox:

1. No money for competitive salaries; and
2. Harry and Jimmy - constant negativity that none of the ballplayers, including those from the opposing teams, would respond to very well. Honest criticsim often turned into excessive bashing and a resentful Jimmy ripping players he did not like for either personal reasons, or the money they made, or both.

antitwins13
11-28-2005, 07:23 PM
When Jimmy suggested swimming as a better option then running on the field at Disco Demolition. Random and classic Jimmy P.

TDog
11-28-2005, 07:53 PM
If I remember correctly, the coach that Jimmy got into the altercation with was Jim Leylund.

Again, I was thinking of a different coach and a different altercation. Piersall made many enemies on the field.

Caray, though, was the one that sent players packing.

LongLiveFisk
11-28-2005, 08:32 PM
That's not what he said (the latter). He said they were "a bunch of horny broads."

How ironic. Jim McMahon said the same exact thing about the women of New Orleans right before Super Bowl XX at the Superdome. You sure you aren't getting your quotes mixed up? :D:

soxfan1965
11-28-2005, 10:54 PM
Jimmy once told Harry he was crazy. Harry said " I'm crazy? You're crazy, and you have the papers to prove it."

They joked constantly about Piersall's past mental problems and Jimmy would always reply, "Harry, I'm sane and I have the papers to prove it." The Sox games were a sideshow back then.

This is cracking me up. I can't believe we had such a funny team. If someone kept a recording of some of their funnier broadcasts, it will sell. I thought it would have been interesting if Tony Perkins (who played Jimmy Piersall in Fear Strikes Out) visited the broadcast booth with those two. After a few Falstaffs, Jimmy and Harry may have started calling him Norman Bates.

ohiosoxfan
11-28-2005, 11:23 PM
I remember a classic moment for Jimmy and Harry when somebody crushed a one-hopper that took a bad bounce and hit Twinkies' shortstop Roy Smalley where it hurts. He went down and Harry proclaimed "That one hit 'em in the groin! He won't be going dancing tonight!" Jimmy followed with "He'll be taking a nice cold bath!"

Lip Man 1
11-28-2005, 11:49 PM
Here is the exact quote from Jimmy on players wives:

Royko asked both Caray and Piersall how they handled the reaction from player’s wives when they criticized their husbands. Caray said “You know Mike I would love to call all the wives together someday and tell them what their husbands say about them across the ballfield.” Piersall said, “First of all they were horny broads that wanted to get married, and they wanted a little money, a little security and a big strong ballplayer. I traveled, I played the game. I got a load of those broads too.”

According to Jimmy the Sox didn't make a big deal out of the quote. According to him Reinsdorf and his wife watched the show and had nothing negative to say about it, then Mrs. Tony LaRussa got wind of it and (according to Jimmy) the Sox players threatened to boycott (forfeit) a game if he wasn't taken to task for it.

Lip

NWSox
11-29-2005, 03:31 AM
This is my main brush with Sox greatness:

When I was growing up, we lived down the street from Lorn Brown, and I hung out with one of his sons. Our parents became friends and actually played some tennis together. Apparently, Jimmy Piersall was looking for an occasional doubles partner and Lorn suggested my mother :rolleyes: So Jimmy calls my house and procedes to convince my mother to play some tennis with him. After that first time out, my mother figured out what was up with ol' Jimmy and stopping taking his calls.

Viva Medias B's
11-29-2005, 09:19 AM
How ironic. Jim McMahon said the same exact thing about the women of New Orleans right before Super Bowl XX at the Superdome. You sure you aren't getting your quotes mixed up? :D:

Actually, didn't that turn out not to be true? A New Orleans sportscaster went on the air with that story but later retracted it. I am sure Grobber 33 could expand on this.

Sox-on-TV44
11-29-2005, 09:55 AM
At the risk of offending many great Sox fans who have posted in this thread, I have to express that I never really liked Harry and Jimmy when they announced the games. While they were certainly truthful and colorful, there was a very strong negativity that came through. No owner in his or her right mind would ever pair these two, or anyone similar again, because it makes the announcers more of an attraction than the team. The result is a circus.

I vividly remember those mid to late 70s Sox teams, and (with '77 being the exception) they were hard to watch, for their play, and their uniforms. Yet I still went to Comiskey often with my brother, his friends, and many times my friends, because we love the White Sox. The circumstances made for a unique pairing (rebel owner with little money and resources, hiring a displaced icon from the Cardinals, and a loose canon), one that should never be repeated.

There were two reasons why some of the best ballplayers from those days never wanted to play for the White Sox:

1. No money for competitive salaries; and
2. Harry and Jimmy - constant negativity that none of the ballplayers, including those from the opposing teams, would respond to very well. Honest criticsim often turned into excessive bashing and a resentful Jimmy ripping players he did not like for either personal reasons, or the money they made, or both.
Okay,you got your opinon about Harry and Jimmy.

But I think i'm not alone here on this one,but it either hear thier style of broadcasting or these alternatives:
:chimp
:morgan
:blockhead
:carter
:santo
http://www.vancourier.com/issues05/015105/photos/sports.jpg

I rest my case!

tebman
11-29-2005, 11:11 AM
At the risk of offending many great Sox fans who have posted in this thread, I have to express that I never really liked Harry and Jimmy when they announced the games. While they were certainly truthful and colorful, there was a very strong negativity that came through. No owner in his or her right mind would ever pair these two, or anyone similar again, because it makes the announcers more of an attraction than the team. The result is a circus.

I vividly remember those mid to late 70s Sox teams, and (with '77 being the exception) they were hard to watch, for their play, and their uniforms. Yet I still went to Comiskey often with my brother, his friends, and many times my friends, because we love the White Sox. The circumstances made for a unique pairing (rebel owner with little money and resources, hiring a displaced icon from the Cardinals, and a loose canon), one that should never be repeated.

There were two reasons why some of the best ballplayers from those days never wanted to play for the White Sox:

1. No money for competitive salaries; and
2. Harry and Jimmy - constant negativity that none of the ballplayers, including those from the opposing teams, would respond to very well. Honest criticsim often turned into excessive bashing and a resentful Jimmy ripping players he did not like for either personal reasons, or the money they made, or both.
All valid points. In fact, the reason Reinsdorf & Einhorn gave for firing/ accepting their resignations was that the team should be the attraction, not the guys in the radio or TV booth. That's why I said in an earlier post that they were fun while they lasted. Piersall especially was a loose cannon who grew increasingly practiced in his cranky-guy act, and as time went on it was pretty clear that the fun wouldn't last indefinitely.

It was like a roller-coaster ride: you enjoy the thrills and laugh at the funny faces people make, but when the ride's over you feel some relief. I think Harry & Jimmy were destined to be a short-run performance like that.

chisox77
11-29-2005, 11:32 AM
Excellent post, Tebman. I couldn't agree more with the roller-coaster analogy and your perspective.

The reason why I posted my thoughts on this subject is that the Harry-Jimmy days represented, at least to me, the hardest of times for the White Sox. They almost moved to Seattle, Veeck could do nothing more than operate the team on a survival model, bad uniforms, endless promotions to get fans into the park, disco demolition, rock concerts held at Comiskey just to pay the bills, a torn up field that was embarassing (Dwight Evans/Red Sox, hurt himself while chasing a fly ball on that massive sand patch, and considered suing the Sox), and no player of real star quality wanted to come here. Those days offered little hope, yet I guess many Sox fans have coped by looking back fondly on a pair of announcers who had the freedom to say things that were interesting and entertaining, yet that reality pointed to the fact that the White Sox were a desperate organization.

I am happy that things have evolved into a 2005 World Series Championship, and that the White Sox have finally achieved a level of operation that other teams strive for.

tebman
11-29-2005, 11:56 AM
Excellent post, Tebman. I couldn't agree more with the roller-coaster analogy and your perspective.

The reason why I posted my thoughts on this subject is that the Harry-Jimmy days represented, at least to me, the hardest of times for the White Sox. They almost moved to Seattle, Veeck could do nothing more than operate the team on a survival model, bad uniforms, endless promotions to get fans into the park, disco demolition, rock concerts held at Comiskey just to pay the bills, a torn up field that was embarassing (Dwight Evans/Red Sox, hurt himself while chasing a fly ball on that massive sand patch, and considered suing the Sox), and no player of real star quality wanted to come here. Those days offered little hope, yet I guess many Sox fans have coped by looking back fondly on a pair of announcers who had the freedom to say things that were interesting and entertaining, yet that reality pointed to the fact that the White Sox were a desperate organization.

I am happy that things have evolved into a 2005 World Series Championship, and that the White Sox have finally achieved a level of operation that other teams strive for.
You're right about the '70s. The Sox, whether under Allyn or Veeck, always seemed to be always at risk of not being able to make the rent. 1977 was such an magical year, certainly not because of any championships, but because so many things came together to make it so much fun. The glow from '77 makes it easy to forget just how derelict the Sox were in the '70s.

That's why opening day in 1981 was such an over-sellout. As I remember, there were more than 51,000 people there that day. The Sunshine Boys had bought the Sox, they'd signed Carlton Fisk, they'd poured money into the ballpark, and brighter days were ahead. But then a string of truly boneheaded actions put the Sox on the defensive -- the strike in '81, Einhorn's Sportsvision scheme, the we-don't-want-no-lowclass-fans message that the Sox brass kept putting out, and then the melodrama with the clumsy extortion for a new ballpark. All the while the Tribune is shoveling coal into its promotion machine to make the Cubs the very symbol of all that is good about Chicago.

Just a shame that the '80s were such a missed opportunity for the Sox, especially after the relative impoverishment of the '70s. Harry and Jimmy were a good thing while they were here, but yeah, their time is long past; we've got a genuine championship team now.

Lip Man 1
11-29-2005, 12:38 PM
The Jim McMahon comment was aired by New Orleans TV sports anchor Buddy DeLillberto. It proved to be absolutely false as McMahon was in his hotel room instead of at the bar where the comment supposedly took place.

As DeLillberto later explained during his 'apology' he got the story from an FM radio DJ who 'supposedly' heard McMahon say this. Naturally he ran with it. Big Mistake... since he never checked his source.

As I recall (and I was in N.O. at the time) he was suspended without pay for a week. He died a year or so ago.

Lip

CluelessJoe1919
11-29-2005, 02:59 PM
This is cracking me up. I can't believe we had such a funny team. If someone kept a recording of some of their funnier broadcasts, it will sell. I thought it would have been interesting if Tony Perkins (who played Jimmy Piersall in Fear Strikes Out) visited the broadcast booth with those two. After a few Falstaffs, Jimmy and Harry may have started calling him Norman Bates.I'm trying to remember which show he said this on, but Piersall came out onto a talk show and the host brought up the fact that Tony Perkins (movie) and Tab Hunter (play) played Piersall in the respective shows....Piersall's quote: "I had to be the only ballplayer to be portrayed by two f--s (homosexuals)."
The host then asked Piersall if he liked the movie Fear Strikes Out, Piersall replied, "No, it was awful. I had to be the only player to make the majors with two left arms."

CluelessJoe1919
11-29-2005, 03:03 PM
Excellent post, Tebman. I couldn't agree more with the roller-coaster analogy and your perspective.

The reason why I posted my thoughts on this subject is that the Harry-Jimmy days represented, at least to me, the hardest of times for the White Sox. They almost moved to Seattle, Veeck could do nothing more than operate the team on a survival model, bad uniforms, endless promotions to get fans into the park, disco demolition, rock concerts held at Comiskey just to pay the bills, a torn up field that was embarassing (Dwight Evans/Red Sox, hurt himself while chasing a fly ball on that massive sand patch, and considered suing the Sox), and no player of real star quality wanted to come here. Those days offered little hope, yet I guess many Sox fans have coped by looking back fondly on a pair of announcers who had the freedom to say things that were interesting and entertaining, yet that reality pointed to the fact that the White Sox were a desperate organization.
I am happy that things have evolved into a 2005 World Series Championship, and that the White Sox have finally achieved a level of operation that other teams strive for.

These are some of the reasons that the '77 team is STILL my favorite team of all time. They had all these things stacked against them and they still won 90 games and took over the city. And Harry and Jimmy really helped, too!

CluelessJoe1919
11-29-2005, 03:14 PM
The Sox were down like 8-1 or something in the seventh and Harry was going through the motions, "outside ball two. 2 and 1." And Piersall blurts out, "Hey Harry, do you remember my ex-wife Sister Mary Holywater?"

Then there was the time in Kansas City when Amos Otis hit a heartbreaking 3-run homer to beat the Sox as the Royals were overtaking the Sox in August of 1977. After Harry threw out a "Holy Cow" as the KC crowd cheered Otis around the bases, Jimmy followed with this: "Look at these people, Harry. They're nothing but a bunch of farmers. Sit down!" (Veeck suspended him for that one).

Piersall also did some play-by-play ( and was atrocious as expected). Mike Hargrove, the human rain delay, was going through his nauseating ritual of getting ready to hit (ala Nomar Garciaparra, only worse) in between pitches. Piersall: "Look at this guy. He's touching his leg. He's touching his arm." Then Piersall yells out of the booth: "HEY!, GET IN THE BOX, SWEETHEART."

CluelessJoe1919
11-29-2005, 03:30 PM
[QUOTE=tebman]You're right about the '70s. The Sox, whether under Allyn or Veeck, always seemed to be always at risk of not being able to make the rent. 1977 was such an magical year, certainly not because of any championships, but because so many things came together to make it so much fun. The glow from '77 makes it easy to forget just how derelict the Sox were in the '70s.

C'mon Tebman--the 70s weren't that bad. You already mentioned the great '77 season. The '78 team, despite losing Zisk and Gamble, put together a 12-game winning streak (or something like that) at the all-star break making it exciting again, before falling, of course.
The '71 team started to jell and Allyn went out and got Dick Allen. The '72 team nearly overtook the Oakland A's, one of the greatest teams of all time. The real tragedy of the 70s was the Sox had loaded teams in 73 and 74 but couldn't stay healthy, in particular, Bill Melton. Then Allen quit in 74 and everything seemed to fizzle.

I remember Opening Day in 81. Sure, there was enthusiasm with new ownership but many fans wouldn't accept mascots Ribbie and Rhubarb and threw beer down on them as they circled the outfield before the game. I always like Reinsdorf-Einhorn, but their ripping of many Sox fans, Veeck, and Harry and Jimmy turned off a lot of fans. I think that had as much to do with Chicago becoming a Cub town as anything.

Fenway
11-29-2005, 03:58 PM
Jimmy's radio show on WIND was never dull.

I had 2 run ins with Jimmy

Once at Wrigley walking along the walkway behind the boxseats I see Jimmy staring at me. I was wearing a Red Sox team jacket popular in the 80's with the 2 red socks on it.

He GRABBED me by the jacket and started screaming "Tom Yawkey would roll over in his grave if he saw you in that jacket." then walked away

At Fenway, I asked him about Pete Rose and Bart Giamatti and he exploded calling Bart names I can not post here.

Jimmy is an orginal

tebman
11-29-2005, 06:56 PM
C'mon Tebman--the 70s weren't that bad. You already mentioned the great '77 season. The '78 team, despite losing Zisk and Gamble, put together a 12-game winning streak (or something like that) at the all-star break making it exciting again, before falling, of course.
The '71 team started to jell and Allyn went out and got Dick Allen. The '72 team nearly overtook the Oakland A's, one of the greatest teams of all time. The real tragedy of the 70s was the Sox had loaded teams in 73 and 74 but couldn't stay healthy, in particular, Bill Melton. Then Allen quit in 74 and everything seemed to fizzle.

I remember Opening Day in 81. Sure, there was enthusiasm with new ownership but many fans wouldn't accept mascots Ribbie and Rhubarb and threw beer down on them as they circled the outfield before the game. I always like Reinsdorf-Einhorn, but their ripping of many Sox fans, Veeck, and Harry and Jimmy turned off a lot of fans. I think that had as much to do with Chicago becoming a Cub town as anything.
We're in complete agreement here. Those of us who were lucky enough to be a part of that '77 season will never forget it. 1978 had some of the afterglow of the '77 season, but there wasn't much left in the tank after Zisk, Gamble, and the others left for free-agent money Veeck's group could'nt afford.

The Dick Allen / Bill Melton teams of the early 70s provided some excitement, but the Sox organization always seemed to be short of money and had a hard time following through. Veeck wrote in his book that when he met with John Allyn in late 1975 to talk about buying the team, Allyn told him he couldn't make his next payroll and needed to close the deal right then. Veeck arranged money from friends in the banking and concession business to help Allyn cover the next payroll. The Messersmith decision that established the right of players to become free agents happened just a week or so after Veeck closed the deal on the Sox. The partnership arrangement he'd set up was based on the assumption that the old rules were still in place -- after free agency became a reality, Veeck's group was at an immediate financial disadvantage. I was there, but I was always worried about whether they'd make it to the next season.

But that was then. This is now, the Sox are World Champs, and the 70s are like ancient tribal history. Harry and Jimmy are part of our folklore, and man, what a great time we had in '77. It's fun to talk about it again. Thanks.

flo-B-flo
11-29-2005, 07:21 PM
These are some of the reasons that the '77 team is STILL my favorite team of all time. They had all these things stacked against them and they still won 90 games and took over the city. And Harry and Jimmy really helped, too!I remember that team and the curtain calls. EVERY homer, and there were a lot of em', there was the player coming on the field for a roar from the crowd. When the hated and feared Royals came to town this came to a head. I was at the game when Hal Macrae hit a grandslam (?) and ran around the bases doffing and waving his batting helmet. Booing has NEVER been that loud.

robertks61
11-29-2005, 07:36 PM
But that was then. This is now, the Sox are World Champs, and the 70s are like ancient tribal history. Harry and Jimmy are part of our folklore, and man, what a great time we had in '77. It's fun to talk about it again. Thanks.


Cheers to that! '77 was a great season and a lot of fun to be at the park but this past season was the best!

Viva Medias B's
11-29-2005, 08:13 PM
I saw Jimmy Piersall a few years ago at the final round of the Western Open. He and Fred Huebner were doing a Score remote by the Clubhouse were the gofers' scores are posted. Jimmy was all agitated at all the spectators standing around the remote. In response, some of the guys said they wanted to be around Jimmy. Piersall then said "Aw, [bovine manure]! You guys just want to get away from your wives!"

slavko
11-29-2005, 11:24 PM
Throw Stroh's into the mix. My cousin and I were walking the concorse prior to a game one day and I had a Stroh's t-shirt on. Jimmy was walking by us and we each shook his (large) hand. He commented that Harry would like my shirt.

A WSCR program host has told the story on air several times about when he, as an intern, entered a broadcast booth and there was Jimmy, holding his (unmentionables) in his hand and asking anyone present if they had ever seen a bigger set of (unmentionables) than these.

tebman
11-29-2005, 11:27 PM
A WSCR program host has told the story on air several times about when he, as an intern, entered a broadcast booth and there was Jimmy...

Oh, that Jimmy...what a card! :rolleyes:

CluelessJoe1919
11-30-2005, 01:06 AM
I remember that team and the curtain calls. EVERY homer, and there were a lot of em', there was the player coming on the field for a roar from the crowd. When the hated and feared Royals came to town this came to a head. I was at the game when Hal Macrae hit a grandslam (?) and ran around the bases doffing and waving his batting helmet. Booing has NEVER been that loud.

Believe it or not, one of the biggest fans of Sox fans in 1977 was the late Royals' catcher Darrell Porter. I interviewed him once while he was stretching before an old-timers game and brought up the 1977 season.

He said that he loved playing in Old Comiskey and he thought the Sox fans that year were THE best he'd ever seen. However, he also said that the curtain calls and the "Na Na Song" got his team more fired up than he'd ever seen them.

He seemed to be a great guy and enjoyed life despite all his troubles.