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elrod
10-21-2005, 08:39 PM
We laugh at the notion of baseball's championship as the "World Series" when only one team plays outside the US. The game itself is much more international now, of course, as players from Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Curacao, Mexico, Venezuela, Panama, Canada, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Dominican Republican and Australia regularly participate. Still, it is largely the American game. That said, the World Series gets a HUGE audience around the world and sometimes it's fun to see what the international media has to say. Let's face it, we are not likely to ever see the White Sox get this much coverage around the world. Use this thread to post some neat stories from around the world on the World Series. Non-English stories would be great too, especially if people can offer a translation via Babelfish or something.

Here's the London Times:
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,10371-1837210,00.html
I love how the "schedule" is called "fixtures". Gives me goosebumps because I lived in the UK for a year and that's what they called the football (soccer) schedule.

TV New Zealand:
http://tvnz.co.nz/view/page/536641/621464
It quotes a guy from "Chicagoans Abroad" who is hosting a party in DC for the Series. Plays up how "purists" will love the Series because of the pitching and small ball.

Financial Times, UK
http://news.ft.com/cms/s/38142442-4257-11da-94c2-00000e2511c8.html
Nice overall roundup with a summary and the usual quips about Black Sox, Cubs and the return of Middle America to the Series.

SoxEd
10-21-2005, 10:00 PM
That FT story was really good for UK coverage - I hadn't even considered looking on their site.

Another Brit 'quality paper', the Daily Telegraph, had this (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/main.jhtml?view=DETAILS&grid=&xml=/sport/2005/10/20/sobase20.xml) to say.

The best I could find on the Guardian's site is this (http://sport.guardian.co.uk/breakingnews/feedstory/0,14604,-5360991,00.html), which you may find either amusing or frustrating, depending on how you look at it.

The BBC website has this (http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/other_sports/baseball/default.stm) about the World Series.

Their website coverage is pretty useless during the season, although bizarrely their teletext system carries the game results and standings all season, up until the playofffs start. After that it's just the game results, and series standings.
Baseball is the poor relation of US Sports on the Beeb - e.g. the NBA standings were up on teletext well into the MLB season and the NBA playoffs.

During the WS itself, anyone curious (or weird) enough can listen in to the BBC' s Sports Radio station's coverage via this (http://www.bbc.co.uk/fivelive/programmes/upallnight.shtml) link.
Go to the 'Listen Live' link at the top of the page, or, post-game, use the 'Listen Again' feature up to one week afterwards.

I'll actually get to watch it live on the TV :o: :D: :gulp:, on relatively new station five (http://www.five.tv/home/frameset/?content=97740&).

elrod
10-21-2005, 10:22 PM
Why did the Torygraph refer to the North Side as the "proleterian side", and contrast it with the "working class" South Side. Must've been a typo.

mjharrison72
10-21-2005, 10:28 PM
All interesting reading. Substantially more detailed than, I would guess, U.S. coverage of cricket, a game which I understand only so far as to know it's nothing like baseball.

To SoxEd, I raise a pint! To many late nights in the old country watching White Sox winners over the next week! To satellite television!
Cheers!
-Mike

Erik The Red
10-21-2005, 10:38 PM
I'll actually get to watch it live on the TV :o: :D: :gulp:, on relatively new station five (http://www.five.tv/home/frameset/?content=97740&).
I followed this link on that channel's site... do you really need to have a license to watch ****ing television? That's total bull****.

SOXintheBURGH
10-21-2005, 10:41 PM
I followed this link on that channel's site... do you really need to have a license to watch ****ing television? That's total bull****.

Well, Trading Spaces was their idea.

I would like to see several of said licensces revoked.

elrod
10-21-2005, 10:57 PM
I followed this link on that channel's site... do you really need to have a license to watch ****ing television? That's total bull****.

In Britain, you pay for a TV license, which funds the BBC. For decades, the Beeb was the only channel on British television. When ITV opened up, then Channel 4, Sky TV (satellite) and now Channel 5, there has been growing pressure to find a new funding mechanism for BBC. The whole licensing thing is stupid. You are supposed to have a license for each TV in the house, and they send out these sensor detection vans that determine if certain houses are connecting two TVs to one license. I suppose it's sort of like when the Cable TV company checks for splicing. But it's the government, which makes it a little different.

Baby Fisk
10-22-2005, 12:11 AM
http://www.25frames.org/media/screens/8656.jpg

"I'm a laydeee! I don't have testicles!"

(sorry, Britain, couldn't resist! :D: )

SOXintheBURGH
10-22-2005, 12:13 AM
http://www.25frames.org/media/screens/8656.jpg

"I'm a laydeee! I don't have testicles!"

(sorry, Britain, couldn't resist! :D: )

You have the Queen on your currency and you love it.

Baby Fisk
10-22-2005, 12:15 AM
You have the Queen on your currency and you love it.
I know. Canada is ridiculous and we love it! :D:

SoxEd
10-22-2005, 11:31 AM
Warning - what follows is a long, off-topic, digression - sorry.


You are supposed to have a license for each TV in the house, and they send out these sensor detection vans that determine if certain houses are connecting two TVs to one license. I suppose it's sort of like when the Cable TV company checks for splicing. But it's the government, which makes it a little different.

Actually, you 'only' need one licence per household, but e.g. if your daughter has a TV at her University, then she needs to have a licence for it, or she can get fined 1000.

Britain - 'Mother of the Free'.
E.g. ownwership of a handgun is an automatic 5-year jail sentence, and we need a Government licence to own a television.
The Police still (for now, at any rate) need a Warrant to get in to your house, but HM Customs & Excise can kick in your front door, tear your house to pieces, find nothing at all and you just have to suck it up.

Oh, and if you exercise your right to buy an unlimited amount of tobacco (for personal use) in another EU country (and pay their Duty on it, which is MUCH lower than that in the UK), but drive your own car back into Britain, HM Customs has decided that if it's more than 800 cigarettes then they'll impound and destroy your car for 'smuggling'.
In direct contravention of EU Law.

To get back to the TV licences, the detection regime is your typical British farce...
The licence supposedly refers to the household (i.e. the address), but their database is keyed on the TV-owner's name.
E.g I have twice had my licence inspected within the first year of moving in to an address - despite having bought licences several months previously.
The Inspector said, on both occasions, "Our records show that you don't have a TV licence", and when I showed him the thing, he said "so, you aren't Mrs. X then?". :rolleyes:
Not last time I checked, no. Given that I'm 6'1", and used to be a Rugby lock-forward, you'd think that that would be obvious, even to a fully-trained Govt Inspector.

The first time was the best - the first question they have to ask is "do you own a TV?".
I was at University, living in a flat over a shop, and the entry was via a Fire Escape, directly in to our living room.
The TV was next to the door, and was switched on when the Inspector arrived. When he asked "do you own a TV?" I was very tempted to answer "no", just to see what he would do...
Of course, having dealt with Petty British Officialdom before, I decided that discretion was the better part of valour and played the game.
I still wonder what he would have said if I'd answered "no"...

The following bit is really more of a hijack... what am I like..?

The thing that irks me about the TV licence is that the BBC uses the money raised to produce all sorts of crappy, lowest-common-denominator TV that the plethora of commercial channels can 'supply'.
The current plague of house/garden makeover shows, 'reality tv' formats and dumbed-down documentaries is a testament to that. :angry:

Stop churning out crap (what George Orwell called Prolefeed), and I'll happily continue to stump up for a licence just to own a TV.

The whole point of the public funding of the BBC is to pay for 'commercially risky' expensive and/or 'minority interest' productions that would otherwise never see the light of day.
These will cease to exist once it becomes exclusively commercially funded.
I eagerly await its upcoming series Rome, which is a co-production with (IIRC) HBO, to see what that turns out like. I'm hoping for something on a par with the 1970's show I, Claudius, but I fear it may be more like the notorious film Caligula. :o:

If it stuck to its remit of educational, informative television, and ground-breaking stuff like Blue Planet and, earlier, Life On Earth (both of which took 7 years to make, like the upcoming Darwin), then it would be fine, but there is a creeping commercialisation going on - e.g. the World Service keeps getting its funding cut and is being increasingly run as a commercial radio service.
The one-off dramas that used to get made here have quietly vanished from the schedules.
The level of inquiry in the science programmes has been steadily falling for years, although the launch of the digital-only new 'highbrow' channel, BBC4, has gone some way to reverse that lamentable trend.

The Government has also attacked the BBC for doing things in new media, rather than concentrating on traditional broadcasting and leaving things like the internet to the commercial sector.
I would argue that the BBC website (which seems to cover an area of Internet the size of Belgium, and is totally ad-free) is an absolutely outstanding resource that the commercial sector would never be able to provide.

I (admittedly with my best tinfoil hat on) view the creeping commercialisation (and eventual privatisation) of the Beeb as a strategy by Government (the Civil Servants, not the Politicians) to destroy the BBC's editorial independence - its News arm has been a pain in the neck for Governments, of every political persuasion, for as long as I remember. :redneck
Destroy its independence, make it 'just another commercial station', and the Govt can apply much more leverage on the editorial policy, and gain control over what the public is allowed to know.

The Dr. David Kelly/Andrew Gilligan affair is proof enough that in this country we still need a media organisation that is both free to scrutinise the Government of the day, and has the resources to do it.

EDIT: One last point about the TV licence - some of the money raised also goes to part-fund Channel 4 and five.
American Sports were first shown on UK TV when Channel 4 showed NFL in the 1980's, and it's five that shows Baseball, NFL and NHL.
I believe that satellite channels have now picked up some MLB games (but only after nine years of coverage on five), and the NBA.

We're still No. 1 in 'Silliest Country in the World' stakes - Canada has nothing on us! :tongue:

fox2
10-22-2005, 01:53 PM
A few more observations from this side of the pond.

In Germany, it's pretty much the same as in England. I have to pay abot $45. every 3 months for a license to watch TV or listen to the radio. My company has to pay about $20. Of course, my company doesn't have any TVs, but I do have a company car, and there's a radio in the car, so ...

Speaking of cricket, I work with a couple of guys from England, and I once mentioned that baseball is the only team sport in the world that doesn't have a clock. Then I corrected myself and said, "I guess cricket doesn't have one either." "Yes it does," said one of the Englishmen, "it runs for five days!"

The point about the "world" series is actually correct, if you think about it. After the NBA "World Championships" a few years ago, John Cleese, the English actor of "Monty Python" fame, said, "When we (England) host a world championship, we invite other countries."

4th Gen. Sox Fan
10-22-2005, 02:11 PM
Houston Astros @ Chicago Box Sox? http://www.five.tv/home/frameset/?content=97740&

Fuller_Schettman
10-22-2005, 02:38 PM
A radio license??

How much is an iPod license? Do you need a license for your computer??

chisoxfanatic
10-22-2005, 02:51 PM
I know. Canada is ridiculous and we love it! :D:

I LOVE your 5-dollar bills! I have one sitting on top of my dresser right now. I wish we could have hockey players on OUR currency!!!

doublem23
10-22-2005, 03:07 PM
I LOVE your 5-dollar bills! I have one sitting on top of my dresser right now. I wish we could have hockey players on OUR currency!!!

You're forgetting one very important thing... No one gives a crap about hockey. :tongue:

chisoxfanatic
10-22-2005, 03:09 PM
You're forgetting one very important thing... No one gives a crap about hockey. :tongue:

:tsk: