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Lillian
08-28-2005, 08:21 AM
I understand that some pitchers appear to throw the ball faster than they actually do. Apparently it is, for the most part, because of the release, which can be harder to pick up with some guys. In addition, a taller pitcher, with a big stride, can release the ball closer to the plate, which means the ball has a shorter distance to travel.
Having said that, it nevertheless is difficult to understand why a guy like Neal Cotts looks so fast, when the radar gun is only showing 90, or 91. When I see him throwing from the center field camera, his fastball looks like it's moving so fast. From that camera angle, the release shouldn't be a factor.
Do you all have the same impression that I do about his velocity, and can anyone explain this phenomena?

akingamongstmen
08-28-2005, 10:33 AM
A lot of that perception comes from the apparent effort that the pitcher is putting into the pitch. Cotts looks like he's playing catch, so that 90+ heater looks incredibly fast.

SOXSINCE'70
08-28-2005, 10:43 AM
A lot of that perception comes from the apparent effort that the pitcher is putting into the pitch. Cotts looks like he's playing catch, so that 90+ heater looks incredibly fast.

Don't forget the deceptive speed of Mariano Rivera.
He and Poasda sometimes look like they're playing a Sunday
afternoon game of catch.Then,once the ball crosses home plate,
it picks up velocity and becomes strike 3 swinging or looking.

MIgrenade
08-28-2005, 11:10 AM
Guardado is much the same. I've never seen so many guys swing and miss at 89MPH fastballs. Maybe not Iguchi, but others.

Vernam
08-28-2005, 04:12 PM
Just as with sprinters, some fastballs start off with good speed and just maintain that rate across the plate (or finish line), while others don't start so fast but instead finish with a big burst of late speed. So in effect, the ball gains velocity at the instant before it reaches the batter.

OK, I admit that all should be in teal. :cool: But I've actually heard baseball announcers make this claim, as if the laws of physics don't apply. That's kind of the visual effect created by "sneaky fast," though; the ball just seems to jump in on you at the very last, and it looks quicker from the batter's box than from the on-deck circle. As you said, Lillian, release point is part of it. So is the relative speed of the pitcher's other pitches.

VC

Taliesinrk
08-29-2005, 10:33 AM
I think that Cotts may have achieved this perception with hitters because he has a slightly unorthodox delivery. If you notice, during his stride there is an almost slight pause and it appears as though me may kick his leg out a bit. Someone correct me if I'm completely off-base here, but that's what it looks like to me, and IIRC, I want to say I heard an announcer talk about it once.

daveeym
08-29-2005, 10:39 AM
Just as with sprinters, some fastballs start off with good speed and just maintain that rate across the plate (or finish line), while others don't start so fast but instead finish with a big burst of late speed. So in effect, the ball gains velocity at the instant before it reaches the batter

VC Can you explain to us the rising fastball as well?:wink: