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Fenway
08-15-2005, 07:05 PM
Hard to believe Mickey Mantle left us 10 years ago.

As much as fans hated the Yankees back in the 50's and 60's, nobody hated Mantle.

http://www.themick.com/10homers.html

nobody has ever hit them like he did

(8) 550 feet (6/5/55, Comiskey Park, Chicago Pitcher: Billy Pierce, Chicago White Sox Right-handed)
On June 5, 1955, at Comiskey Park in Chicago, the Yankees battled the White Sox. In the fourth inning of the second game of a doubleheader, Mickey stepped in against lefty Billy Pierce. Pierce tried to slip a fastball past Mickey and the Mick tore into it, sending a scorching high drive to left. The ball cleared the 360-foot mark, crossed the 160-foot roof and descended to smash a car windshield on 34th Street outside. A parking lot attendant recovered the ball.
Some papers reported that Mickey's drive landed on the roof or hit a light tower but didn't go out of the park. But the Comiskey Park attendants on the roof went to the Yankees locker room after the game to tell Mickey that his homer had cleared the roof and gone completely out of the park.
Only Jimmy Foxx had ever hit a ball that far. However, Mickey's homer is the only one to have eyewitnesses to verify that it actually cleared the stadium.


In 1994 I was in the audience at a Fanfest in Boston and the final part of the program was Mantle and Ted Williams on stage. Bob Costas was the MC and he just sat back and enjoyed hearing these 2 icons swap stories. The ironic part, Ted had just recovered from his first stroke and was frail and we all sensed we may never see him again. Mantle on the other hand looked great. 12 months later he was gone.

from The Boston Globe
http://infoweb.newsbank.com/iw-search/we/InfoWeb?p_action=doc&p_theme=aggregated4&p_topdoc=1&p_docnum=1&p_sort=YMD_date:D&p_product=NewsBank&p_text_direct-0=document_id=(%200EADE0EFF9AF3B70%20)&p_nbid=Q66C5FUWMTEyNDE1MDcwMy45ODc0NDc6MToxMjpuY2R tZXRyb3dlc3Q&&p_multi=BGBK


The Mantle of real life was greeted with a standing ovation ("I never thought I'd be up here in Boston and get a standing ovation . . . I thought they were saving that for Ted"), and told a story of how his hitting by instinct was so different from Williams' science of hitting. The former Yankee said he sat and listened to Williams at an All-Star game give advice after advice about hitting "and when we left the All-Star Game I went 1 for 23. Then I figured I better go back to swinging as hard as I can at every pitch they throw at me."
The evening ended on an emotional note when Williams took the stage, greeted Red Sox of his generation and younger, and was given a big hug by Jim Rice ("I still feel the Red Sox have had three left fielders, Ted Williams, Carl Yastrzemski and Ted Williams"). Williams, in a white suit -- a tieless suit -- said, "I feel fortunate to to be here tonight; I guess I feel fortunate to be anyplace tonight."
Williams praised Mantle ("He must be the most humble star player in the world") and recounted that famous last homer, off Baltimore's Jack Fisher 34 years ago. And when Costas asked Williams if he thought about tipping his cap, something Williams hadn't done over three decades -- The Kid gave a fascinating answer.
"I went around the bases," said Williams, "and I knew it was my last time going around the bases, and I even thought about doing it going around the bases, but I just . . . couldn't . . . do . . . it."
Williams may be a step slower after his stroke, but his personality is not. He thanked New England's fans ("the sports fans of New Engkland have to be the best"), and again took a shot at the Boston media who played such a part in why he . . . just . . . couldn't tip . . . his . . . hat. "They had a press in Boston," said Williams, "that made it next to impossible to think anything good about anybody on the team."
And the night, a wonderful night, ended with Williams speaking from his heart. "Baseball," said The Kid, "what a game . . ."

Fenway
08-15-2005, 07:13 PM
from the Bob Costas eulogy

"It brings to mind a story Mickey liked to tell on himself and maybe some of you have heard it. He pictured himself at the pearly gates, met by St. Peter who shook his head and said 'Mick, we checked the record. We know some of what went on. Sorry, we can't let you in. But before you go, God wants to know if you'd sign these six dozen baseballs.'

http://www.themick.com/Eulogy.html

SOXfnNlansing
08-15-2005, 07:15 PM
:gulp: here's to you Mick! ........... and you too Fenway:smile:

RavenswoodFan
08-15-2005, 08:40 PM
I'm too young to have seen him play. But man what a ball player! I also admire his courage in his late life to battle his Alcoholism and admit that his life had been a mess because of it.
A real class act! God Bless Ya Mick!:smile: May you run out every ground ball in heaven!

SomebodyToldMe
08-15-2005, 08:54 PM
One of the only reasons that I like the Yanks: The Mick. I model my batting stance after the guy. Man, I wish I could have seen him play in person. But NOOOOO. I had to be born a few decades later.

As Billy Crystal said about him: "Elvis in pinstripes"

Here's to you, Mickey :gulp: . And who knows, maybe I'll name my kid Seven as a tribute to you. :cool:

Stroker Ace
08-15-2005, 09:48 PM
10 years! Seems like it was not even half that. Here's to you, Mick:gulp:

ewokpelts
08-16-2005, 08:45 AM
We tend to forget that he died from drinking his liver away....as great a ballplayer he was, he wasnt a good role model(he admitted that himself after he realize dhe drank his liver away).

Gene

Saracen
08-16-2005, 09:52 AM
I went to the funeral here in Dallas. Very moving. Can't believe it's been 10 years!

Tekijawa
08-16-2005, 10:58 AM
He was the first baseball I ever got signed at a Card show, for a 14 year old kid $50 was a lot for a player who I'd only seen highlights of... but now that ball has become VERY expensive and sits in the middle of a large and still growing collection of signed baseballs. I can't believe that was 10 years ago already!

BigEdWalsh
08-16-2005, 11:01 AM
I only saw him play once, but at least I can say that. It was like seeing Babe Ruth. The guy was a legend.

Paulwny
08-16-2005, 12:24 PM
Hard to believe Mickey Mantle left us 10 years ago.

As much as fans hated the Yankees back in the 50's and 60's, nobody hated Mantle.
."


I DID !!!!!

PaulDrake
08-16-2005, 12:34 PM
I read Mickey Mantle's ten longest home runs and now I have to reread it. No way anyone hits a ball more than 600 feet. Home runs #7 and #8 in old Griffith Stadium and the original Comiskey seem to me to be documented the best. The others leave me with questions. Not to take anything away from the Mick. He hit more home runs of the "tape measure" variety than anyone else. 734 feet? Call me cynical, skeptical, or something worse. I'm not going for it.

Paulwny
08-16-2005, 12:52 PM
I read Mickey Mantle's ten longest home runs and now I have to reread it. No way anyone hits a ball more than 600 feet. Home runs #7 and #8 in old Griffith Stadium and the original Comiskey seem to me to be documented the best. The others leave me with questions. Not to take anything away from the Mick. He hit more home runs of the "tape measure" variety than anyone else. 734 feet? Call me cynical, skeptical, or something worse. I'm not going for it.


From Hypertextbook.com
William Jenkinson, "The Home Run Encyclopedia"
"When Mickey Mantle cleared the left-center-field bleachers at Clark Griffith Stadium in Washington on April 17, 1953, the entire baseball world was lead to believe the ball had traveled 565 feet from home plate to the point where it landed. In truth, the figure derived from the distance from home plate to the place where a neighborhood child retrieved the ball."

Nobody can hit a ball farther than a yankmee.

maurice
08-16-2005, 12:57 PM
One of the most talented players ever. He potentially could have been the best player ever, but he pissed so much of his life away on booze. What a waste.

PatK
08-16-2005, 01:30 PM
One of the most talented players ever. He potentially could have been the best player ever, but he pissed so much of his life away on booze. What a waste.

I agree.

Having someone close to me die while waiting for a liver transplant, I was more than a little disturbed that Mickey got the liver he needed in two days.

Great player, yes.

maurice
08-16-2005, 02:13 PM
Having someone close to me die while waiting for a liver transplant, I was more than a little disturbed that Mickey got the liver he needed in two days.

Yeah. Their handling of the situation was pretty much the opposite of the amazingly classy Walter Payton.

veeter
08-16-2005, 02:45 PM
In fairness to Mantle he never thought he would live long so he lived it up.

TornLabrum
08-16-2005, 02:52 PM
In fairness to Mantle he never thought he would live long so he lived it up.

Correct. His father died young, and I think his father's family might have had a history of dying young. Mantle thought he would be dead before he hit 50 (or maybe even younger), so he decided to take advantage of the short amount of time he thought he had to live.

Unfortunately he ended up shortening his own life.

Irishsox1
08-16-2005, 03:01 PM
As a kid, seeing footage of Mantle hitting homeruns lefty and righty really blew my mind. I became a switch hitter after that, although I never hit lefty in a game.

The only thing that pissed me off about Mantle was how quick he got his second liver and that the doctors knew that the new liver wasn't going to save his life but they still put it in anyways. A waste of a good liver for someone that didn't deserve it and someone it wasn't going to help. I guess it pays to be good 'ol 7....Mickey Mantle!! (In my best Mel Allen voice)

PaulDrake
08-16-2005, 04:22 PM
Hepatitis C probably contributed as much to the premature demise of Mickey Mantle as his hard drinking did. Before sophisticated screening tests were done on blood donors many sick people were given tainted blood. Untold thousands contracted Hepatitis C in that manner. There was much controversy about how Mantle obtained his liver tranplant, which was a failure. I'm not going to get into that here. I know there are reasons why a patient will suddenly vault to the top of a transplant list and it has nothing to do with celebrity and everything to do with finding a compatible donor. I'm on record as being in the minority and not totally convinced that MLB didn't sit on Palmeiro's positive steroid test, so I won't debate Mantle and his liver any further. I just don't know.

TDog
08-16-2005, 05:18 PM
...

As much as fans hated the Yankees back in the 50's and 60's, nobody hated Mantle. . . ."

I hated Mantle. I only started following baseball, as a preteen boy, at the end of his career, and I knew he was not a nice person, as Jim Bouton later documented after Mantle's retirement. Mantle was immensely talented, but so was Albert Belle. Some people around here think Barry Bonds is a wonderful human being, though.

Imagine having so much talent that you could waste a good portion of it and still win triple crowns. The way Mantle died says a lot. When I see a smiling picture of Mantle, I imagine a bubble over his head with the words, "Hey, you using that liver?"

Railsplitter
08-17-2005, 07:56 AM
Unfortuately, the family history of esrly death cave Mantle a live for the moment attitude. He said it himself "IF I'd known I'd live this long, I'd taken better care of myself" What a sad thing to say about yourself.

VenturaSoxFan23
08-18-2005, 12:21 PM
I was at the Sox-Orioles game when they announced he passed away.

I don't think it was the drinking so much as his knees got really bad that ended his playing career.

PaulDrake
08-18-2005, 12:40 PM
In his last 4 years Mantle was just a shadow of his former self. By that time he was really hobbling along and not capable of the day to day grind. Mantle had undergone a number of surgeries and injections for a variety of physical problems. Somewhere along the line he contracted Hepatitis C. That more than anything is what killed him, at least in the opinion of some medical professionals.

DarkCloudDropo
08-18-2005, 01:07 PM
I clearly remember him swinging and winding up on his knees toward the end.
It seemed like it took him 30 seconds just to get upright again.
It was a pretty sad site.

hose
08-18-2005, 01:18 PM
Mickey Mantle is about as good as it gets as far as ballplayers go.