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View Full Version : Everyone should turn on Comcast Sportsnet right now.


soltrain21
08-08-2005, 03:00 PM
There is a 12 year old ASG going on. (Prelude to the Little League World Series, I would presume.)


Anyways, the kid pitching for the white team is throwing about 80 miles per hour and has a curve ball that just falls off the table.


It is insane...I am waiting for his elbow to break.

Brian26
08-08-2005, 05:00 PM
There is a 12 year old ASG going on. (Prelude to the Little League World Series, I would presume.)


Anyways, the kid pitching for the white team is throwing about 80 miles per hour and has a curve ball that just falls off the table.


It is insane...I am waiting for his elbow to break.

Ridiculous. Kids that age should not be throwing curveballs.

:hawk

"Location and changing speeds are the keys to long-term success as a pitcher!"

buehrle4cy05
08-08-2005, 08:38 PM
Ridiculous. Kids that age should not be throwing curveballs.

:hawk

"Location and changing speeds are the keys to long-term success as a pitcher!"

I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks it. It's sad when so many little league coaches place winning ahead of a kid's future.

cleanwsox
08-09-2005, 12:14 AM
Are we sure it's not Kerry Wood on a rehab outing?

MIgrenade
08-09-2005, 12:26 AM
Or maybe the kid is 16.

SoxSpeed22
08-09-2005, 01:09 AM
Or maybe the kid is 16.I invented an elbowless curve ball, but you need a wrist. You start off holding the side of the ball and then come straight down and then come down with the wrist. It's hard to explain. Shame that a lot of position players make it, but few pitchers.

Stroker Ace
08-09-2005, 01:13 AM
"Location and changing speeds are the keys to long-term success as a pitcher!"Exactly. These kids become amazed that they can throw a curve, and end up hurting themselves in the process. And it doesn't matter how many pitches you have, what matters is that you can get hitters to look at them go by for strikes.

doublem23
08-09-2005, 01:23 AM
I invented an elbowless curve ball, but you need a wrist. You start off holding the side of the ball and then come straight down and then come down with the wrist. It's hard to explain. Shame that a lot of position players make it, but few pitchers.

Hmmm... I'd probably have to see it to exactly understand what your talking about, but from the sounds of it, that's not really a curveball, more just a funky motion put onto a standard change-up. I was always taught the change was simply the same arm action of a fastball, but you really come down on the ball, like you're pulling down a shade or projector screen.

Though, I still may not be understanding exactly what you mean, but if I am, my advice is to learn how to hide the ball real well. Any solid hitter should be able to spot the drastically different ways the ball is being handled pretty quickly, IMO, especially if you're delivery shows him the ball early.

Edit... OK, now that I've busted out one of my many baseballs in trying to understand what exactly you're talking about, it also seems like that pitch would lend itself to some funky arm angles, too. Though this is elementary for pitchers, hide your pitches... While that could work, if you're going to throw something funky, you better not get into a noticeable rhythm, you'll get shelled.

ilsox7
08-09-2005, 01:25 AM
I invented an elbowless curve ball, but you need a wrist. You start off holding the side of the ball and then come straight down and then come down with the wrist. It's hard to explain. Shame that a lot of position players make it, but few pitchers.

That pitch has been around for a long, long time. At least back to the late 80's or early 90's when I was going through Little League.

While it is generally a bad idea to let a 12 year old throw a curve, the general rule that was always used is when you start hitting puberty, you can start throwing breaking stuff. Some kids hit puberty at age 12, so it is not completely out of the question to see a kid safely throwing like that at 12.

However, I'd MUCH rather see a 12 year old with a good fastball and a good change-up. Having those two pitches and throwing them effectively will make you the best pitcher in your league.

StockdaleForVeep
08-09-2005, 02:14 PM
Sure its not kerry wood after his release from the cubs? I mean, the news is slow at times?

soltrain21
08-12-2005, 07:40 PM
If you are looking for something to do between Sox pitches then turn on ESPN.


Dante Bichette Jr. is pitching in a LL qualifying game. His father is one of the coaches, too. As is Mike Stanley.