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soxgirl617
07-30-2005, 10:29 AM
I am trying to convince two colleagues that Big Frank is a fan-friendly nice guy. They are stuck back in the 1990s, and keep talking trash about what a "jerk" Frank is. I keep telling them I hear all sorts of stories about how fan-friendly Frank is, but they aren't buying it. I know I've read a number of posts here about good experiences with Frank, but I can't seem to locate them this morning.

Please indulge me, and help convince my colleagues, and post your "Frank is a nice guy" stories. Thanks!

Palehose13
07-30-2005, 10:38 AM
I am trying to convince two colleagues that Big Frank is a fan-friendly nice guy. They are stuck back in the 1990s, and keep talking trash about what a "jerk" Frank is. I keep telling them I hear all sorts of stories about how fan-friendly Frank is, but they aren't buying it. I know I've read a number of posts here about good experiences with Frank, but I can't seem to locate them this morning.

Please indulge me, and help convince my colleagues, and post your "Frank is a nice guy" stories. Thanks!

Back in the mid-90's my mom worked at the bank where Frank Thomas and Bo Jackson conducted their banking. Both men were extremely friendly and often brought their kids when they came in. I caught a foul ball at a game and I wanted my mom to get Frank to sign it, but it was bank policy that they couldn't ask the players fr autographs. The next time that Frank came in, my mom told him that I caught a foul ball at the park and how I was a big fan of his. Frank told my mom where and when he was having dinner that night and then said "Hope to see you there with that ball." My parents went todinner that night and got the ball signed. Apparently he was/is a great guy.

harwar
07-30-2005, 10:43 AM
Frank had some personal problems back then.He made some bad investsments,both commercial and personal.
However;His big problem with the press came about because he was baited,misquoted,and taken out of context and attacked from just about every side by the national and local media.

TornLabrum
07-30-2005, 11:25 AM
A few years ago my son (who was probably about 21 or 22 at the time was out to dinner at Hooter's in Downers Grove. When the party at the table next to his group was seated, my son said, "That's Frank Thomas." He went over, got his menu autographed and Frank posed for a couple of pictures with him.

I would also add that Frank has always been generous in autographing items for Windy City Sox Fans raffles. I have an autographed ball and framed picture he autographed that I won at the annual raffle a couple of years ago. He has never refused us.

As far as I'm concerned, the media types that paint him as a jerk are more likely themselves the jerks.

doogiec
07-30-2005, 12:05 PM
My impression of Frank Thomas comes from witnessing several situations where my son had an opportunity to cross paths with him. My son is 18 years old, and therefore his only memories of the White Sox include Frank Thomas on the roster.

We attended one of the early SoxFests in the early 90's where Frank Thomas was signing. Back then, they did not cut off lines, they just rotated players on the stage, and whichever one was there when you got to the front was the autograph you got. Frank was scheduled for a 2 hour shift, the line was huge and clearly we had no chance of making it up front before Frank was done. But Frank, seeing the length of the line, continued signing for an additional 2 hours, allowing my son to make it up front. They also had a "no pictures" rule, but when Frank saw my wife had a camera, he made a point of picking up my son over the table, and we got a great picture of Frank with his huge smile (and my son with his) that will certainly always be on my son's wall wherever he ends up. After a four hour shift of signing, Frank was more friendly and personable than 99% of players are when signing one autograph.

A few years later, my son was struggling in one of his grade school classes. His teacher knew he was a Sox fan, and a Thomas fan. Without giving any details, she promised him something "cool" if he got his grade up to a B. He did and on one of the last days of the school year, he was paged to go to the school office. He had received a Fed Ex shipment from Jacobs Field in Cleveland (where the Sox were at the time) and inside was a baseball, signed "Keep up the great work", with my son's name, and Frank's autograph. While I know there must of been some assistance from the White Sox (I doubt Frank dropped it in a Fed Ex box himself), it surprised me that the current MVP would take the time to understand why he was signing the ball so he could personalize it, probably in the clubhouse pregame. Can you imagine being in 4th grade, and getting a Fed Ex package from the AL MVP?

My son has made a point of saying "hi" to Frank every time he has had the chance at Sox games, Soxfest, Spring Training, etc. And every single time, Frank responds with a big smile, a "How ya doing Big Guy", and a slap on the back.

I really believe the best way to judge an adult's character is to observe how they treat children. Because of the manner in which Frank Thomas treated him, Frank will always be a hero to my son. And I think my admiration for Frank should be obvious, and very few professional athletes get that kind of respect from me.

And he is the greatest White Sox hitter in history.

TimoandAaron
07-30-2005, 08:54 PM
My impression of Frank Thomas comes from witnessing several situations where my son had an opportunity to cross paths with him. My son is 18 years old, and therefore his only memories of the White Sox include Frank Thomas on the roster.

We attended one of the early SoxFests in the early 90's where Frank Thomas was signing. Back then, they did not cut off lines, they just rotated players on the stage, and whichever one was there when you got to the front was the autograph you got. Frank was scheduled for a 2 hour shift, the line was huge and clearly we had no chance of making it up front before Frank was done. But Frank, seeing the length of the line, continued signing for an additional 2 hours, allowing my son to make it up front. They also had a "no pictures" rule, but when Frank saw my wife had a camera, he made a point of picking up my son over the table, and we got a great picture of Frank with his huge smile (and my son with his) that will certainly always be on my son's wall wherever he ends up. After a four hour shift of signing, Frank was more friendly and personable than 99% of players are when signing one autograph.

A few years later, my son was struggling in one of his grade school classes. His teacher knew he was a Sox fan, and a Thomas fan. Without giving any details, she promised him something "cool" if he got his grade up to a B. He did and on one of the last days of the school year, he was paged to go to the school office. He had received a Fed Ex shipment from Jacobs Field in Cleveland (where the Sox were at the time) and inside was a baseball, signed "Keep up the great work", with my son's name, and Frank's autograph. While I know there must of been some assistance from the White Sox (I doubt Frank dropped it in a Fed Ex box himself), it surprised me that the current MVP would take the time to understand why he was signing the ball so he could personalize it, probably in the clubhouse pregame. Can you imagine being in 4th grade, and getting a Fed Ex package from the AL MVP?

My son has made a point of saying "hi" to Frank every time he has had the chance at Sox games, Soxfest, Spring Training, etc. And every single time, Frank responds with a big smile, a "How ya doing Big Guy", and a slap on the back.

I really believe the best way to judge an adult's character is to observe how they treat children. Because of the manner in which Frank Thomas treated him, Frank will always be a hero to my son. And I think my admiration for Frank should be obvious, and very few professional athletes get that kind of respect from me.

And he is the greatest White Sox hitter in history.reading that storie, i almost shed a tear.

slobes
07-30-2005, 11:32 PM
reading that storie, i almost shed a tear.

Ya really, that was awesome.

Lip Man 1
07-31-2005, 12:34 AM
Maybe someone should send these to the Tribune for a story.

Lip

TornLabrum
07-31-2005, 12:41 AM
Maybe someone should send these to the Tribune for a story.

Lip

Or maybe to Dan McNeil who perpetuates the myth that Frank is a jerk (but not because he is a member of the media, as he'll be the first to tell you).

surfdudes
07-31-2005, 10:12 AM
At the San Diego Padres game this year, after batting practice at the second game, Frank was the last one on the field before the game, signing autographs for all the fans. I yelled " Hey Frank, Welcome back!" from the rail, and he came over and shook my hand and said "Thank You". Enough said.....

soxgirl617
08-01-2005, 08:01 AM
Thanks, all. These stories confirm my thoughts on Frank: that he's gotten a horrible rap from the media. (And anyone could fall into that trap!) Anyone else?

maurice
08-01-2005, 02:00 PM
post your "Frank is a nice guy" stories

I challenge anybody to post a legit "Frank isn't a nice guy" story.

Frank has always been a class act to the fans. The media hates him because, for whatever irrelevant reason, they're not happy with the way he treats the media . . . oh, and also because a drunken David Wells thinks that a guy with a torn arm muscle is a sissy.

Fairly recent "Frank is a nice guy" story: After the huge standing ovations he received at this year's Memorial Day game, Frank went out of his way to make sure that every available media outlet got a quote of him thanking the fans and saying how much it meant to him.

Tekijawa
08-01-2005, 03:23 PM
Back in the early 90's my brothers and I would wait out in back of the park for autographs by the players parking lot, the fenced in area that they now have covered over with white slats now. My 2 bothers and I and another kid were the only people that managed to wait back there that day as there was a Huge Downpour for about 2 hours after the game before Frank Finally came out. This was in his heyday so it was worth the wait, if we could get him to sign something. As he came over to His car his wife at the time started screaming at him to get in the Car it's raining out and that it was "just 4 kids, who cared" to which he responded with a glare in her direction. Well in the pouring rain he walked over from the other side of the players parking lot and Signed our cards for us, he probably didn't think anything of it althogh the rain soaked NICE clothes that he had on would have been better off if he had just jumped in the car, but it made a huge impression on me and my brothers and I'm guessing the other kids that waited there too... All three of us just stared at the three Baseball cards with his signature the whole 65 mile trip back to DeKalb in Silence... it was probably the best hour car ride that any parent has ever had with two sub-teenaged boys and one gawky midleschooler (me)!


Thanks Frank!

Dustin/Teki

woodenleg
08-01-2005, 03:44 PM
I talked to one guy who said "that guy has got to be the biggest ******* in the world." Now come on.

I guess some people are a little too obsessed with the game to acknowledge that there are very real "bad guys" outside of sport.

I love it when they say he just doesn't smile enough or something. That says a lot about what irks them.