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RKMeibalane
07-27-2005, 04:01 PM
Summer Sanders and FSN continued paying tribute to the hitting stars of the past, this time listing the best hitters of the 1980's. Note: the Yankees-Red Sox love-fest continues...

10. Rickey Henderson
9. Robin Yount
8. Andre Dawson
7. Don Mattingly
6. Dave Winfield
5. Eddie Murray
4. Mike Schmidt
3. Wade Boggs
2. George Brett
1. Tony Gwynn

I don't agree with number ten at all. Rickey was a great player, but he's never really been known as a great hitter. Paul Molitor should have been on this list. He was mentioned on the show as an honorable mention.

fquaye149
07-27-2005, 04:18 PM
Summer Sanders and FSN continued paying tribute to the hitting stars of the past, this time listing the best hitters of the 1980's. Note: the Yankees-Red Sox love-fest continues...

10. Rickey Henderson
9. Robin Yount
8. Andre Dawson
7. Don Mattingly
6. Dave Winfield
5. Eddie Murray
4. Mike Schmidt
3. Wade Boggs
2. George Brett
1. Tony Gwynn

I don't agree with number ten at all. Rickey was a great player, but he's never really been known as a great hitter. Paul Molitor should have been on this list. He was mentioned on the show as an honorable mention.

I think Dale Murphy deserves some consideration here.

1951Campbell
07-27-2005, 05:16 PM
Summer Sanders and FSN continued paying tribute to the hitting stars of the past, this time listing the best hitters of the 1980's. Note: the Yankees-Red Sox love-fest continues...

10. Rickey Henderson
9. Robin Yount
8. Andre Dawson
7. Don Mattingly
6. Dave Winfield
5. Eddie Murray
4. Mike Schmidt
3. Wade Boggs
2. George Brett
1. Tony Gwynn

I don't agree with number ten at all. Rickey was a great player, but he's never really been known as a great hitter. Paul Molitor should have been on this list. He was mentioned on the show as an honorable mention.

Molitor's a better hitter. Rickey's a better lead-off man. But Molitor would be the best lead-off man of the 80's, if only Rickey didn't exist.

SABRSox
07-27-2005, 09:20 PM
In defense of Rickey, he did lead the AL in OPS in 1990, at 1.016. Of course, he had marginal power at best, but his OBP was always spectacular. I'd say he'd merit consideration, along with Murphy, who for a period of 4 or 5 years, may have been about a good a hitter as anyone could find.

You could also make an argument for Darryl Strawberry to be on that list.

Madvora
07-27-2005, 09:32 PM
I don't agree with number ten at all. Rickey was a great player, but he's never really been known as a great hitter. Paul Molitor should have been on this list. He was mentioned on the show as an honorable mention. I'm surprised about Molitor too.

Hederson is a .279 career hitter, led the league in walks once and runs 5 times, stolen bases 6 times (130 SBs in 1982!) His highest season batting average was .325 in 1990. .401 career OBP. He had some pop too with career high HRs in 1986 and 1990 with 28. No seasons above 100 RBI, but that has to do with being a lead off hitter.
http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/alltime/playercard?playerId=5977&type=0
http://www.baseball-reference.com/h/henderi01.shtml

Molitor is a .306 career hitter, led the league in at bats twice, runs twice and hits twice. Highest season batting avg was .353 in 1987. .369 career OBP. His career high in HRs was 22 in 1993. Two seasons over 100 RBI
http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/alltime/playercard?playerId=5977&type=0
http://www.baseball-reference.com/m/molitpa01.shtml

Henderson was a total Sox killer and was an awesome lead off man, but I do see Molitor as more of a pure hitter.


- Edit - whoops... I forgot this was just about 80's hitting.

veeter
07-27-2005, 09:36 PM
Mattingly needs to be higher. He was Lou Gherig before his back went out.

Chips
07-27-2005, 09:40 PM
Even though he only played through 85, Rod Carew was a damn good hitter, and the same can be said for Kirby Puckett.

Mattingly should definetly be higher up. The guy was a damn good hitter.

fquaye149
07-27-2005, 11:09 PM
Mattingly needs to be higher. He was Lou Gherig before his back went out.

So Don Mattingly, who almost every non-yankee-fan agrees is not even close to a HOFer should be ahead of which of the six hall of famers who are ahead of him?

elrod
07-27-2005, 11:34 PM
Kirby Puckett should be there for sure. Tim Raines makes a strong case.

brewcrew/chisox
07-28-2005, 12:16 AM
I luuuuv Paul Molitor





:hurt
I wonder who the best hitter of the 90's is?

doublem23
07-28-2005, 12:57 AM
:hurt
I wonder who the best hitter of the 90's is?

They did the best hitters of the 1990s, list, too. Griffey, Jr. was #1 (god damn, I can't remember who was #2 now for the life of me... Barry Bonds, I think) and the Big Hurt was numero tres.

RKMeibalane
07-28-2005, 09:28 AM
So Don Mattingly, who almost every non-yankee-fan agrees is not even close to a HOFer should be ahead of which of the six hall of famers who are ahead of him?

Agreed. I grew up watching Mattingly, and believe me, he was a great player. But to say that he should be placed ahead of guys who are already in the HOF is ridiculous. It's a shame that his back problems reduced his power numbers, but since that is what happened, it's not fair to rate him above other players.

jdm2662
07-28-2005, 10:04 AM
Paul Molitor needs to be on the list.
________
Shower japanese (http://www.****tube.com/categories/985/japanese/videos/1)

Palehose13
07-28-2005, 06:56 PM
They did the best hitters of the 1990s, list, too. Griffey, Jr. was #1 (god damn, I can't remember who was #2 now for the life of me... Barry Bonds, I think) and the Big Hurt was numero tres.

I think that is pretty fair.

Tragg
07-28-2005, 09:30 PM
In defense of Rickey, he did lead the AL in OPS in 1990, at 1.016. Of course, he had marginal power at best, but his OBP was always spectacular. I'd say he'd merit consideration, along with Murphy, who for a period of 4 or 5 years, may have been about a good a hitter as anyone could find.

You could also make an argument for Darryl Strawberry to be on that list.

Walking is part of hitting. Henderson should be on that list.

fquaye149
07-29-2005, 02:25 AM
I think that is pretty fair.

I think you could make an argument for that top three in any possible order.

1.) Bonds didn't do his serious serious mashing until the 21st century (coincidentally when he was on Roids). Of course he was a phenomenal hitter in the 90's...but he doesn't run away with it the way he would 2000-2004. However he was over 1.000 Ops for 8 straight years to end the 90's, topping out at 1.136. His eye has always rivaled Frank's and it was (is) awe inspiring to watch them dominate pitching with their patience and hitting ability.

2.) Griffey is spectacular. His swing is picture perfect and he's a dream to watch play even now. In the 90's he was the best player by far, bar none. However, as a hitter, his numbers don't deserve to be in the same breath as Frank's. Only twice in the 90's did he crack .400 OBP and that was with a .402 and a .408. His power totals snuck past Franks in certain years (and in other years, Frank far surpassed his) but his OPS was over 1.000 only four times (1.025, 1.076, 1.020, 1.028). The remainder of his 90's he vacillated b/t mid .800's and mid .900's. Frank was over 1.000 SIX TIMES from 1990-1999. He topped out at 1.217 in 1994!!!!! He only dipped below .900 twice, in 1998 and 1999.

3.) Frank was the man until 1998...and then was merely a very good hitter. Clearly his eye was unparalleled. He was nearly .450 obp throughout the 90's

I mean, personally I take Frank over Griff and probably over Bonds. However, as pure hitters, all three are equally talented. Griffey has the sweetest swing, but Bonds and Frank did a hell of a lot more. I don't know. You also must consider Mike Piazza among the top 4 hitters of the 90's...which makes it a joke he didn't make the top 10

PeteWard
07-29-2005, 06:21 AM
Walking is part of hitting. Henderson should be on that list.

And the all-time greatest at referring to himself in the third person:

"Ricky Henderson is just going to do what Ricky Henderson has to do , in a Ricky Henderson-esque sort of Ricky Henderson fashion. Do y'all know where Ricky Henderson's coming from?"
-Ricky Henderson

RKMeibalane
07-29-2005, 10:04 AM
You also must consider Mike Piazza among the top 4 hitters of the 90's...which makes it a joke he didn't make the top 10

He did. He was number five or six, IIRC.

fquaye149
07-29-2005, 10:41 AM
He did. He was number five or six, IIRC.

well then slap my ass and call me shirley:redface:

mccombe_35
07-29-2005, 10:46 AM
I think Dale Murphy deserves some consideration here.

I agree. He was the 80's version of Sosa imo. (Just hitting-wise, yes i hate Sosa) look them both up at baseball-ref - they were very similar players. times in the top 10 in HRs, RBIs, Ks, Slg, etc... career totals are very different because it was a different game back then.

RKMeibalane
07-29-2005, 12:46 PM
I agree. He was the 80's version of Sosa imo. (Just hitting-wise, yes i hate Sosa) look them both up at baseball-ref - they were very similar players. times in the top 10 in HRs, RBIs, Ks, Slg, etc... career totals are very different because it was a different game back then.

Of course it was. Murphy didn't have the benefit of Flintstone vitamins.

Palehose13
07-29-2005, 12:52 PM
well then slap my ass and call me shirley:redface:
Well ok...if you insist. :wink:

fquaye149
07-29-2005, 12:55 PM
Of course it was. Murphy didn't have the benefit of Flintstone vitamins.

also he didn't get to have his molar removed, allowing him to eat healthy meals and gain 30 pounds in the offseason!:o: :o: :o:

DarkCloudDropo
07-29-2005, 02:21 PM
No one thinks Harold might belong on that list?