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MERPER
07-24-2005, 09:45 PM
Head over to the Sox official site and read the article about there not being a single MVP on the team...

Under the check your scorecard section, it mentions that the spider that bit Die was poisonous and the doctors have done tests to "determine the actual culprit, which could present a life-threatening situation for Dye."

However, Chicagosports.com also has a small article about this and mentions nothing about being life-threatening...

Anyone have any information about this or any updates?

delben91
07-24-2005, 09:51 PM
Head over to the Sox official site and read the article about there not being a single MVP on the team...

Under the check your scorecard section, it mentions that the spider that bit Die was poisonous and the doctors have done tests to "determine the actual culprit, which could present a life-threatening situation for Dye."

However, Chicagosports.com also has a small article about this and mentions nothing about being life-threatening...

Anyone have any information about this or any updates?

During WGN's broadcast today, they showed a clip of Ozzie answering questions before the game. He said that some sort of ointment was put on/in the bites yesterday and that Dye was feeling much better. In fact, Ozzie said that Jermaine told Ozzie that he could play today, but Ozzie wanted to give him another day off.

So JD might be back in right field tomorrow in KC.

TornLabrum
07-24-2005, 09:54 PM
Head over to the Sox official site and read the article about there not being a single MVP on the team...

Under the check your scorecard section, it mentions that the spider that bit Die was poisonous and the doctors have done tests to "determine the actual culprit, which could present a life-threatening situation for Dye."

However, Chicagosports.com also has a small article about this and mentions nothing about being life-threatening...

Anyone have any information about this or any updates?

Spider bites, depending on the species inflicting them, can indeed be deadly. That's why they were running tests.

boiler up
07-24-2005, 10:16 PM
let's hope it wasn't a brown recluse

davenicholson
07-24-2005, 10:17 PM
During WGN's broadcast today, they showed a clip of Ozzie answering questions before the game. He said that some sort of ointment was put on/in the bites yesterday and that Dye was feeling much better. In fact, Ozzie said that Jermaine told Ozzie that he could play today, but Ozzie wanted to give him another day off.

So JD might be back in right field tomorrow in KC.
http://www.movieprop.com/tvandmovie/Seinfeld/jackie.jpg

You put the balm on? Who told you to put the balm on?

balke
07-24-2005, 10:41 PM
let's hope it wasn't a brown recluse


They are way downplaying everything if it was.

maristsox
07-24-2005, 10:42 PM
http://www.movieprop.com/tvandmovie/Seinfeld/jackie.jpg

You put the balm on? Who told you to put the balm on?




LMAO

tacosalbarojas
07-24-2005, 11:22 PM
They are way downplaying everything if it was.Since we haven't heard very many specifics about the story, I am assuming there's still some concern about JD's health. On the other hand, it could just be the general lack of coverage we receive. Either way, hopefully he'll be back in the lineup tomorrow night and be able to speak to everything that happened after tomorrow's game.

SOXintheBURGH
07-24-2005, 11:26 PM
http://www.movieprop.com/tvandmovie/Seinfeld/jackie.jpg

You put the balm on? Who told you to put the balm on?

This is the most public of my many humilations.

Dick Allen
07-24-2005, 11:42 PM
I hated $#@!! spiders enough before all this.

Rocklive99
07-24-2005, 11:52 PM
http://www.movieprop.com/tvandmovie/Seinfeld/jackie.jpg

You put the balm on? Who told you to put the balm on?

:rolling:

balke
07-25-2005, 12:06 AM
Since we haven't heard very many specifics about the story, I am assuming there's still some concern about JD's health. On the other hand, it could just be the general lack of coverage we receive. Either way, hopefully he'll be back in the lineup tomorrow night and be able to speak to everything that happened after tomorrow's game.


He was at the game in the dugout. Brown Recluse has acid that eats your skin. I don't believe there's an ointment or cure to stop it. He'd be in severe pain, and seeing a specialist if that was the case I'm sure. I guess its possible, but a brown recluse bite is a big deal. I think its more likely he had an allergic reaction to some other type of spiderbite, and it swelled very large.

TornLabrum
07-25-2005, 12:08 AM
He was at the game in the dugout. Brown Recluse has acid that eats your skin. I don't believe there's an ointment or cure to stop it. He'd be in severe pain, and seeing a specialist if that was the case I'm sure. I guess its possible, but a brown recluse bite is a big deal. I think its more likely he had an allergic reaction to some other type of spiderbite, and it swelled very large.

I think the original reports said the bites got infected.

ChiSoxRowand
07-25-2005, 12:35 AM
Do they have Brown Recluse spiders in the midwest?

bluestar
07-25-2005, 01:13 AM
A few facts about spiders and this case:

Almost ALL spiders are poisonous. The bite of most spiders does not inject enough venom to cause anything more than irritation in humans, however.
While both the Black Widow and Brown Recluse spider bite can be deadly, death resulting from bites of either creature is extremely rare. As a matter of fact, there have been no deaths reported in the United States resulting directly from spider bites in about 10 years.
The bite of the Brown Recluse can cause a necrosis of the skin around the bite area and severe long term effects. HOWEVER, many people that are bitten by a Brown Recluse never suffer anything more than varied levels of irritation at the bite area for a few days.
Misdiagnosis of Brown Recluse spider bites is very common, because infection, especially staph infection, can mimic the necrotic effect of the Brown Recluse bite. There are also a number of spider bites (and other bug bites) that can produce short-term results very similar to the bite of the Brown Recluse.
The "life-threatening" potential of Dye's case is more likely related to the infection of the bites than any venom injected during the bites. Any open wound can become infected, and a staph infection can be particularly nasty and even life threatening.

jabrch
07-25-2005, 01:15 AM
A few facts about spiders and this case:

Almost ALL spiders are poisonous. The bite of most spiders does not inject enough venom to cause anything more than irritation in humans, however.
While both the Black Widow and Brown Recluse spider bite can be deadly, death resulting from bites of either creature is extremely rare. As a matter of fact, there have been no deaths reported in the United States resulting directly from spider bites in about 10 years.
The bite of the Brown Recluse can cause a necrosis of the skin around the bite area and severe long term effects. HOWEVER, many people that are bitten by a Brown Recluse never suffer anything more than varied levels of irritation at the bite area for a few days.
Misdiagnosis of Brown Recluse spider bites is very common, because infection, especially staph infection, can mimic the necrotic effect of the Brown Recluse bite. There are also a number of spider bites (and other bug bites) that can produce short-term results very similar to the bite of the Brown Recluse.
The "life-threatening" potential of Dye's case is more likely related to the infection of the bites than any venom injected during the bites. Any open wound can become infected, and a staph infection can be particularly nasty and even life threatening.


Yet another lesson learned at WSI!

bluestar
07-25-2005, 01:16 AM
Do they have Brown Recluse spiders in the midwest?

Yes. They are found primarily in the midwest.

Refer to the map on this page (http://dermatology.cdlib.org/DOJvol5num2/special/recluse.html) to see the areas where Recluse spiders are common.

Ron Karkovice
07-25-2005, 02:54 AM
I heard on the score that he had multiple bites and they got infected

He gone
07-25-2005, 06:34 AM
I was bitten in the ankle by a black widow and my ankle swelled up and it turned black and blue. The discoloration started traveling up leg. My ankle felt like I sprained it. I had trouble walking for a couple of days. I was given a shot in the rear-end and had to take Anti-biotics for a couple of weeks.



My buddy's wife was bitten by a brown recluse a couple of years ago and she now has a really big scare on her leg. She was hospitalized and had to have plastic surgery. The pioson kills a big area around the bite.

Hopefully Dye's bite was not from the Brown recluse.

VenturaFan23
07-25-2005, 08:49 AM
has anyone heard any reports of people witnessing jermaine dye climbing up a building or jumping from building to building along Michigan Ave?

seriously, i can't stand spiders either. yet another reason in a long list of why i hate them.

bluestar
07-25-2005, 09:07 AM
I was bitten in the ankle by a black widow and my ankle swelled up and it turned black and blue. The discoloration started traveling up leg. My ankle felt like I sprained it. I had trouble walking for a couple of days. I was given a shot in the rear-end and had to take Anti-biotics for a couple of weeks.

My buddy's wife was bitten by a brown recluse a couple of years ago and she now has a really big scare on her leg. She was hospitalized and had to have plastic surgery. The pioson kills a big area around the bite.

Hopefully Dye's bite was not from the Brown recluse.

I have seen numerous cases of bites from the Black Widow and the Brown Recluse (I was a research assistant for Dr. John Zic at Vanderbilt University Medical Center for over a year. Dr. Zic is one of the foremost authorities on spider bites in America. A research team at VUMC also has developed a Brown Recluse anti-venom that is still in testing, but has been used successfully in many cases), and the two incidences you mention are fairly typical of bites by either of these spiders. The Black Widow bite produces more immediate results, and most victims describe it as being extremely painful. However, the symptoms only last a few days, especially if treated. (Untreated Black Widow bites result in death in about 5% of the cases, but there have been no reported deaths from a Black Widow bite in 10 years in the U.S.) The Brown Recluse, on the other hand, often produces no immediate effects other than an itchy bump or blister-like bite area. The bite area continues to worsen over the next hours and days and can literally destroy large areas of flesh over weeks and even months. Plastic surgery and even amputation are somewhat unusual, but not unheard of in Brown Recluse bite victims. Scarring is very common. The venom of the spider produces necrosis in the skin, in other words, the skin around the bite begins to die.

It is very unlikely that Dye's bite(s) came from one or more Brown Recluse spiders. He has apparently responded to treatment, and victims of severe Brown Recluse bites often do not usually respond to things like topical treatments and are often resistant to antibiotics.

People in the midwest live with the Brown Recluse spider and have even been known to handle them without being bitten. They are not aggressive spiders. I offer these comments from Rick Vetter, a professor in the Department of Entomology at the University of California, Riverside from an article he wrote titled, "Myth of the Brown Recluse: Fact, Fear and Loathing":

In its native range, the brown recluse is a very common house spider. A colleague in Missouri found 5 in a child's bedroom one night, a person in Arkansas found 6 living under his box spring in his bedroom, during a cleanup at the Univ. of Arkansas, 52 were found in a science lab that was being used everyday, a colleague found 9 living under one piece of plywood in Oklahoma, a grad student and I collected 40 of them in a Missouri barn in 75 minutes, and would have collected more, but we ran out of vials to house them. One amazing story is an 8th grade teacher in Oklahoma checking up on his students avidly collecting material by some loose bricks around a flagpole on an insect collecting trip. In about 7 minutes, 8 students collected 60 brown recluses, picking them all up with their fingers and not one kid suffered a bite. An even more amazing story is that of a woman in Lenexa, Kansas who collected 2,055 brown recluse spiders in 6 months in 1850s-built home. This family of 4 has been living there 8 years now and still not one evident bite. (see Vetter and Barger 2002, Journal of Medical Entomology 39: 948-951). When you find brown recluses in an adequate environment, you do not find one, you find dozens. And yet, the people who live with these spiders rarely get bitten nor do they run around in constant fear.

The Brown Recluse hunts its food at night. It does not build a web and capture its food as many people expect of spiders. (It does construct a very disorganized web for laying and hatching eggs.) It hides in a dark place during the day, and hunts at night. People are bitten when they mash a Brown Recluse against their bare skin. This can be the result of rolling over a Brown Recluse that has ventured into a bed during the night, or by putting on clothing or shoes where a Brown Recluse has decided to take up residence. People that live in areas where Brown Recluse spiders are common should be careful when putting on shoes or clothing they have not worn in a while. When cleaning out places that are not often disturbed (closets, attics, basements, etc.) gloves and adequate clothing should be worn for protection. The Brown Recluse cannot bite through clothing, as it has an "uncate" fang structure, i.e. their fangs are too short to penetrate very deeply. The Brown Recluse is very resilient and has adapted well to living around humans.

I could go on and on, but I'll stop now. :smile:

eriqjaffe
07-25-2005, 10:01 AM
has anyone heard any reports of people witnessing jermaine dye climbing up a building or jumping from building to building along Michigan Ave?If so, maybe Ozzie can put Dye in left when the Sox visit Boston later.

Harry Chappas
07-25-2005, 10:50 AM
has anyone heard any reports of people witnessing jermaine dye climbing up a building or jumping from building to building along Michigan Ave?

seriously, i can't stand spiders either. yet another reason in a long list of why i hate them.

I'm with you. I've dove with sharks, owned a snake in college, etc., but there's nothing I fear more than spiders. This very thread is giving me a case of the jeebies. I wonder where he was bitten. If it was in Cleveland, I'd like to know what hotel they were staying in so that I can cross them off my list...

tacosalbarojas
07-25-2005, 01:39 PM
I'm with you. I've dove with sharks, owned a snake in college, etc., but there's nothing I fear more than spiders. This very thread is giving me a case of the jeebies. I wonder where he was bitten. If it was in Cleveland, I'd like to know what hotel they were staying in so that I can cross them off my list...The Trib, much to my shock, had it today...and it was in the Cleveland hotel, so cross it off your list! Unreal. These are supposed to be five star joints!

Hendu
07-25-2005, 07:36 PM
I have seen numerous cases of bites from the Black Widow and the Brown Recluse (I was a research assistant for Dr. John Zic at Vanderbilt University Medical Center for over a year. Dr. Zic is one of the foremost authorities on spider bites in America. A research team at VUMC also has developed a Brown Recluse anti-venom that is still in testing, but has been used successfully in many cases), and the two incidences you mention are fairly typical of bites by either of these spiders. The Black Widow bite produces more immediate results, and most victims describe it as being extremely painful. However, the symptoms only last a few days, especially if treated. (Untreated Black Widow bites result in death in about 5% of the cases, but there have been no reported deaths from a Black Widow bite in 10 years in the U.S.) The Brown Recluse, on the other hand, often produces no immediate effects other than an itchy bump or blister-like bite area. The bite area continues to worsen over the next hours and days and can literally destroy large areas of flesh over weeks and even months. Plastic surgery and even amputation are somewhat unusual, but not unheard of in Brown Recluse bite victims. Scarring is very common. The venom of the spider produces necrosis in the skin, in other words, the skin around the bite begins to die.

It is very unlikely that Dye's bite(s) came from one or more Brown Recluse spiders. He has apparently responded to treatment, and victims of severe Brown Recluse bites often do not usually respond to things like topical treatments and are often resistant to antibiotics.

People in the midwest live with the Brown Recluse spider and have even been known to handle them without being bitten. They are not aggressive spiders. I offer these comments from Rick Vetter, a professor in the Department of Entomology at the University of California, Riverside from an article he wrote titled, "Myth of the Brown Recluse: Fact, Fear and Loathing":



The Brown Recluse hunts its food at night. It does not build a web and capture its food as many people expect of spiders. (It does construct a very disorganized web for laying and hatching eggs.) It hides in a dark place during the day, and hunts at night. People are bitten when they mash a Brown Recluse against their bare skin. This can be the result of rolling over a Brown Recluse that has ventured into a bed during the night, or by putting on clothing or shoes where a Brown Recluse has decided to take up residence. People that live in areas where Brown Recluse spiders are common should be careful when putting on shoes or clothing they have not worn in a while. When cleaning out places that are not often disturbed (closets, attics, basements, etc.) gloves and adequate clothing should be worn for protection. The Brown Recluse cannot bite through clothing, as it has an "uncate" fang structure, i.e. their fangs are too short to penetrate very deeply. The Brown Recluse is very resilient and has adapted well to living around humans.

I could go on and on, but I'll stop now. :smile:

As bad as those spiders are, they've got nothing on the Sydney Funnel Web Spider, the most poisonous spider in the world. http://www.usq.edu.au/users/weppner/dangerous/sydney_funnel_web_spider.htm

What is it with Australia and their venomous spiders, snakes, jellyfish, etc?

Rocklive99
07-25-2005, 07:37 PM
Dye is starting tonight

MikeLove
07-25-2005, 07:54 PM
wow thanks for all the spider info haha

its a non issue now, but during the game yesterday hawk said the bites got infected, and dj said they were on his ass, like where would slide so that makes sense

SoxEd
07-25-2005, 08:02 PM
As bad as those spiders are, they've got nothing on the Sydney Funnel Web Spider, the most poisonous spider in the world. http://www.usq.edu.au/users/weppner/dangerous/sydney_funnel_web_spider.htm

What is it with Australia and their venomous spiders, snakes, jellyfish, etc?

Everything in Australia is poisonous, spiky, and trying to eat you - and that's just the vegetation!
:D:

Austrlia also has Black Widows - aka the 'Dunnie Spider' (it often hides under toilet seats).
'How can you tell if they're there?"
"Usually by the screams..."

My mom spent ten years in Australia, and after she returned to England she wouldn't walk around countryside barefoot for years, because she'd been too scared to in Aus!

The other nasty thing about the Funnelweb is that its neurotoxic venom has absolutely no effect on dogs - so if your pet is messing around with a funnelweb in the yard, he'll be fine, but if your kid decides to brush the arachnid off his face...

PaulDrake
07-25-2005, 08:21 PM
Yes. They are found primarily in the midwest.

Refer to the map on this page (http://dermatology.cdlib.org/DOJvol5num2/special/recluse.html) to see the areas where Recluse spiders are common. I live in the Midlands of South Carolina and I found a spider in my place that looked just like the recluse in figure 3 in the link you provided. Perhaps he walked here from Georgia, or of course perhaps I'm not an expert and it really wasn't a brown recluse.

StockdaleForVeep
07-25-2005, 08:33 PM
http://www.movieprop.com/tvandmovie/Seinfeld/jackie.jpg

You put the balm on? Who told you to put the balm on?

http://www.covers.com/images/2005/dye_jermaine050225.jpg"The Miestro, man!"

Jurr
07-25-2005, 10:26 PM
Man..it's terrible living with those damn recluses. I have at least one close call a week with them. I live in a town house in Memphis that overlooks the Mississippi River. It's a nice place, but the mosquitos are terrible. And, for some reason, there is a ton of brown recluses in our place,no matter how much it's sprayed. I do shake out my clothes and I shake the comforter before bed, but I think it's a matter of time before I get some form of bite.

BTW, I love all of this talk about necrosis and the like. Makes me feel like I'm in clinical pathology again.

LongLiveFisk
07-25-2005, 10:31 PM
let's hope it wasn't a brown recluse

Amen to that. I have seen pictures of what happens to the skin after a bite by one of these. The skin besically turns red, purple, black and the skin reacts as though it was sitting in acid for a while. It just disintegrates. I almost threw up when I saw Day 10 after the bite! :o:

Stay FAR away from these.

Whitesox029
07-26-2005, 03:11 AM
has anyone heard any reports of people witnessing jermaine dye climbing up a building or jumping from building to building along Michigan Ave?

seriously, i can't stand spiders either. yet another reason in a long list of why i hate them.
you and me both, buddy. I'm actually mildly arachnophobic. When I see one inside my house I must kill it before I can continue what I'm doing, and I usually end up in a cold sweat during the process of killing it (a very careful process indeed; if it escaped I would have to leave the room for hours.)

In all the threads about this I haven't seen anyone mention the coincidence that it occurred in Cleveland...maybe it's an omen from the gods of political correctness who think the team should be changed back to the Cleveland Spiders.

Harry Chappas
07-26-2005, 09:47 AM
Man..it's terrible living with those damn recluses. I have at least one close call a week with them. I live in a town house in Memphis that overlooks the Mississippi River. It's a nice place, but the mosquitos are terrible. And, for some reason, there is a ton of brown recluses in our place,no matter how much it's sprayed. I do shake out my clothes and I shake the comforter before bed, but I think it's a matter of time before I get some form of bite.

BTW, I love all of this talk about necrosis and the like. Makes me feel like I'm in clinical pathology again.

Great. Now I have to add Memphis to my growing list of cities I will never visit!

bluestar
07-26-2005, 09:54 AM
The odd thing about arachnophobia to me is that spiders are one of the most beneficial creatures that live in our environment. If not for a healthy spider population, we would be overrun with all sorts of nasty, harmful bugs. Relatively speaking, spider bites are extremely rare. The benefits of having spiders among us far outweighs the negatives.

With that said, I have to say they scare me, too. My fear became worse after I saw what some spider bites could do to people. I live in an old house in Tennessee (for another couple of weeks, anyway), and I have seen Brown Recluse spiders in the house (especially the atttic) and Black Widow spiders in the crawl space under the house. I almost never get in bed without checking under the sheets and under my pillow. This is irrational behavior, because I don't think I have ever seen a spider in my bed. I will not put on shoes without banging them against the ground first, and if it is a pair of shoes I have not worn in awhile, I will get a flashlight and look into the shoe to make sure there are no spiders there. (The Brown Recluse AND the Black Widow seem to love to get inside shoes. I've seen many bitten toes and feet.) Again, I've never found a spider in my shoes, but it doesn't stop me from checking.

Harry Chappas
07-26-2005, 05:01 PM
My last spider-related post. I have always had an irrational fear of spiders and it was compounded a year ago when I put on my fishing waders, which were hanging in my garage, unused, for about a year. About a 1/2 hour later I felt this sharp pain followed by a couple of my painful bites. Since I was chest deep in water there wasn't much I could do but start punching myself wherever I felt the light tickle of a spider while trudging toward shore as quickly as possible. I was bitten three times in all. I found a half-dozen spiders in my waders, probably because one of the nasty little critters laid eggs in the wader's thigh. If I was afraid of spiders before this incident, you can imagine how much I loathe them now!

Fantosme
08-12-2005, 05:10 AM
Evolution of a brown recluse bite:

http://nastyspiderbite.ytmnd.com/

(If your using Mozilla & it says you need to use plug-ins, try IE)

whtsx1959
08-12-2005, 11:14 AM
^ Not for the faint of heart