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View Full Version : Obscure (and not-so obscure) Sox-related Literature


MarySwiss
07-21-2005, 06:25 PM
[Literary Discussion Alert. Cubs fans within range might want to avoid this thread. Over your heads.]

Like most well-read Sox fans, I own a couple of Rich Lindberg's wonderful books-"Stuck on the Sox" and "Who's on Third?" I will shortly be purchasing Dan Helpingstine's two books and the one by Ron Kittle. And of course I own "Eight Men Out."

But I also own a REALLY obscure, out-of-print book called "A Pennant for the Kremlin." This book was copyrighted in 1964 and written by then-Sun Times columnist Paul Molloy. In it, the owner of the Sox died and left the team to Russia. Written during the Cold War era, the book is quite humorous, and it made me wonder if there were any other antique, obscure Sox-related books out there. Especially since, on the back cover of my book, it says that Molloy also wrote a book called "And Then There Were Eight," about which I have been unable to turn up any information, but which sounds baseball-related as well.

Baby Fisk
07-22-2005, 09:06 AM
But I also own a REALLY obscure, out-of-print book called "A Pennant for the Kremlin." This book was copyrighted in 1964 and written by then-Sun Times columnist Paul Molloy. In it, the owner of the Sox died and left the team to Russia. Written during the Cold War era, the book is quite humorous
Holy Crap! The legends were true! I'd heard of this book but have never been able to locate a copy.

Another semi-obscure Sox-related book is "You Know Me Al" -- a series of fictitious letters written by a minor league player who gets a shot with the White Sox. It was written by the one and only Ring Lardner back in the Shoeless Joe era and compiled into a book. It's available through amazon.

Another rare gem is a book called "Commie", the only published biography of the Old Roman himself, Charles Comiskey. It was written during the Sox heyday, coming off their 1917 world championship. The Sox were on top of the world (in fact, Comiskey had coordinated an around-the-world baseball tour for the Sox and NY Giants). Comiskey comes off looking like a titan, a man who could do no wrong. The most chilling part of the book is in the final chapter, when Comiskey does some musing about the future of the Sox and the future of baseball. He says that things have never been brighter, totally oblivious to the black clouds of 1919 that loomed just over the horizon... also found on amazon.

Does anyone want some more Totally Biased Book Reviews?

Madvora
07-22-2005, 09:40 AM
I've got a great one. It's called "Minnie and The Mick." It's about the White Sox/Yankees rivalry from the 50's. It's a really good account of that time period. They go into breaking down individual games that were huge between these two teams.

Here it is...
http://images.amazon.com/images/P/1888698020.01._SCMZZZZZZZ_.jpg
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1888698020/qid=1122039551/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_ur_2_1/002-5007155-0104025

eriqjaffe
07-22-2005, 10:00 AM
Holy Crap! The legends were true! I'd heard of this book but have never been able to locate a copy.There are a couple copies up on eBay right now.

MarySwiss
07-22-2005, 10:06 AM
Holy Crap! The legends were true! I'd heard of this book but have never been able to locate a copy.

Another semi-obscure Sox-related book is "You Know Me Al" -- a series of fictitious letters written by a minor league player who gets a shot with the White Sox. It was written by the one and only Ring Lardner back in the Shoeless Joe era and compiled into a book. It's available through amazon.

Another rare gem is a book called "Commie", the only published biography of the Old Roman himself, Charles Comiskey. It was written during the Sox heyday, coming off their 1917 world championship. The Sox were on top of the world (in fact, Comiskey had coordinated an around-the-world baseball tour for the Sox and NY Giants). Comiskey comes off looking like a titan, a man who could do no wrong. The most chilling part of the book is in the final chapter, when Comiskey does some musing about the future of the Sox and the future of baseball. He says that things have never been brighter, totally oblivious to the black clouds of 1919 that loomed just over the horizon... also found on amazon.

Does anyone want some more Totally Biased Book Reviews?

I love book reviews! And I have heard of "You Know Me Al," but not "Commie." (I see a large order from Amazon looming!)

As for "Kremlin," that will probably take some bigtime lucking out on your part. I spend a lot of time hanging around used book stores, and I've never seen a copy anywhere. You have to be in the right store at the right time.

But ya never know! I once lucked into a copy of "The Last Catholic in America" (very funny book with a Southside Chicago setting) after looking for it for several years. Good luck!

Baby Fisk
07-22-2005, 10:07 AM
There are a couple copies up on eBay right now.
And now there's only one. Massive thanks for the heads up, eriqjaffe. :cheers:

MarySwiss
07-22-2005, 10:09 AM
And now there's only one. Massive thanks for the heads up, eriqjaffe. :cheers:

Wow, that was fast! Be interested to hear how you like it. As I recall, it's pretty funny, and I guess it's time for a reread.

Baby Fisk
07-22-2005, 10:11 AM
I love book reviews! And I have heard of "You Know Me Al," but not "Commie." (I see a large order from Amazon looming!)

As for "Kremlin," that will probably take some bigtime lucking out on your part. I spend a lot of time hanging around used book stores, and I've never seen a copy anywhere. You have to be in the right store at the right time.

But ya never know! I once lucked into a copy of "The Last Catholic in America" (very funny book with a Southside Chicago setting) after looking for it for several years. Good luck!

Sorry, I spelled the title wrong: "Commy" - The Life Story of Charles A. Comiskey. (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0786415983/qid=1122041372/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/102-2578847-1157706?v=glance&s=books)

MarySwiss
07-22-2005, 10:15 AM
And now there's only one. Massive thanks for the heads up, eriqjaffe. :cheers:.

Wow, that was fast! Congrats! Be interested to hear what you think of it when you finish it. As I recall, it's pretty funny. I think it may be time for a reread.

TDog
07-23-2005, 04:04 AM
...

But ya never know! I once lucked into a copy of "The Last Catholic in America" (very funny book with a Southside Chicago setting) after looking for it for several years. Good luck!

Some White Sox references augment the humor. John Powers' best book, though, was "The Unoriginal Sinner and the Ice Cream God," also set in Chicago, about a time when the Dan Ryan was still new and there was an observation deck in the Prudential Building.

MarySwiss
07-23-2005, 11:05 AM
Some White Sox references augment the humor. John Powers' best book, though, was "The Unoriginal Sinner and the Ice Cream God," also set in Chicago, about a time when the Dan Ryan was still new and there was an observation deck in the Prudential Building.

And don't forget "Do Black Patent Leather Shoes Really Reflect Up?" All three books were well-written and very funny, and if you were a kid who went to Catholic grammar and high schools in Chicago in the 60s, "Last Catholic" really hit home.

TDog
07-23-2005, 07:42 PM
And don't forget "Do Black Patent Leather Shoes Really Reflect Up?" All three books were well-written and very funny, and if you were a kid who went to Catholic grammar and high schools in Chicago in the 60s, "Last Catholic" really hit home.

"Last Catholic" and "Patent Leather Shoes" are fictionalized retellings of his Catholic upbring and both worth reading. "Unoriginal Sinner" is an original novel worth re-reading.

MarySwiss
07-23-2005, 08:04 PM
"Last Catholic" and "Patent Leather Shoes" are fictionalized retellings of his Catholic upbring and both worth reading. "Unoriginal Sinner" is an original novel worth re-reading.

Thanks, TDog. Been awhile since I've read "Unoriginal Sinner." I guess I'll have to "cinch it up and hunker down," and look for a copy.