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Mark
07-20-2005, 02:08 PM
According to last week's SI, the first ball ever pitched in an American League game was by Chicago White Sox right-hander Roy Patterson, in a game against the Cleveland Blues on April 24, 1901 at South Side Park. The Sox won the game 8-2, but the first-pitch ball was never found. It's speculated that it was saved for posterity by home plate umpire Tom Connolly, who according to one of his daughters, "had a keen sense of history."

The Sox won the AL pennant that season with an 83-53 record, finishing five games ahead of the Boston AMERICANS.

batmanZoSo
07-20-2005, 02:39 PM
According to last week's SI, the first ball ever pitched in an American League game was by Chicago White Sox right-hander Roy Patterson, in a game against the Cleveland Blues on April 24, 1901 at South Side Park. The Sox won the game 8-2, but the first-pitch ball was never found. It's speculated that it was saved for posterity by home plate umpire Tom Connolly, who according to one of his daughters, "had a keen sense of history."

The Sox won the AL pennant that season with an 83-53 record, finishing five games ahead of the Boston AMERICANS.

What's the deal with 1901, we just won the pennant and that's it? Was there no world series that year?

scottjanssens
07-20-2005, 02:41 PM
What's the deal with 1901, we just won the pennant and that's it? Was there no world series that year?

If memory serves 1903 was the first World Series. There was no MLB back then, the two leagues were seperate entities. I forget when they merged.

BridgePortNative
07-20-2005, 02:55 PM
There were a lot of competing leagues around at that time, American, National, Federal, etc..... when the Federal League folded, they merged. They merged cuz there were a lot of court issues of players going to another league.

bah, enough history rant,that ball is worth $150,000

ChiSoxPatF
07-20-2005, 02:57 PM
The Western League became the American League in 1900 and declared itself a "Major League" in 1901 when the ChiStockings (originally from Sioux City, IA then St Paul, MN) won the AL pennant. The two leagues agreed to a "World Series" to be played in 1903 which had the Boston Pilgrims beating the Pittsburgh Pirates.

So theres our history lesson for the day... let's go :gulp:

fquaye149
07-20-2005, 03:00 PM
According to last week's SI, the first ball ever pitched in an American League game was by Chicago White Sox right-hander Roy Patterson, in a game against the Cleveland Blues on April 24, 1901 at South Side Park. The Sox won the game 8-2, but the first-pitch ball was never found. It's speculated that it was saved for posterity by home plate umpire Tom Connolly, who according to one of his daughters, "had a keen sense of history."

The Sox won the AL pennant that season with an 83-53 record, finishing five games ahead of the Boston AMERICANS.

That's not esoteric. That's obscure.

Mark
07-20-2005, 03:01 PM
There was no World Series in 1901 and 1902. It all started in 1903 because:

"After 2 years of bitter competition and player raiding, the National and American Leagues made peace and, as part of the accord, agreed to a postseason series between the league pennant winners."

Of course, three years later, in 1906:

"Some consider this the greatest World Series upset. The Chicago Cubs record was 116-36, setting a regular-season winning percentage record which still stands. The White Sox had a strong pitching staff but were the worst-hitting team in the American League. The "Hitless Wonders" got all the hitting they needed to shock their crosstown rivals, winning four games to two. Ninety-nine years later, the White Sox won the franchise's third World Championship, defeating the St. Louis Cardinals in six games."

OK, so I added the last sentence. :wink:

miker
07-20-2005, 03:12 PM
"The White Sox had a strong pitching staff but were the worst-hitting team in the American League."

Just another case of history repeating itself?
(Not that we will see the Flubs in the Series...)

scottjanssens
07-20-2005, 03:21 PM
The Chicago Cubs record was 116-36, setting a regular-season winning percentage record which still stands.

That's still the record for wins as well (tied, of course, with the 2001 M's). To break the winning pct. record a team in a 162 games would have to win 124. Jeebus.

Lip Man 1
07-20-2005, 06:19 PM
Here's another oddity about that first game. 'Dummy' Hoy was in the Sox outfield. He was a deaf-mute. Because he couldn't hear anything umpires were forced to start using hand signals for ball, strike, safe, out.

Before then then simply verbalized.

Lip

whtsx1959
07-20-2005, 06:26 PM
There was no 1904 World Series.

The New York Giants didn't feel the AL team (I think Boston) was good enough to play against them.

TornLabrum
07-20-2005, 06:40 PM
There was no 1904 World Series.

The New York Giants didn't feel the AL team (I think Boston) was good enough to play against them.

Not exactly. McGraw was a dirty ball player and a dirty manager. Ban Johnson had had enough of it and had issued several suspensions to try to discipline McGraw, who was managing the Baltimore Orioles (now the New York Yankees).

When John T. Brush, the new owner of the New York Giants, decided he wanted McGraw as manager in the middle of the 1902 season, he and McGraw made a deal for McGraw to join the Giants and strip the Orioles of their best players. The AL was forced to re-stock the Orioles with players from the other teams in the league.

In partial retaliation for this, the AL sold the franchise to a couple of New Yorkers, giving the Giants competition in Manhattan itself.

McGraw's resentment of Johnson (something he later shared with Charles Comiskey), and Brush's hard line on the AL as a result of the franchise shift, were the two factors that combined to cancel the World Series that year.

Interestingly enough the rules that goverend the Series beginning in 1905 were drawn up by Brush.

buehrle4cy05
07-20-2005, 08:40 PM
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"Lois, Who's the Boss isn't a food."