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View Full Version : How many roof shots for Frank


mike squires
07-15-2005, 11:53 AM
Say old Comiskey is still standing and Frank has played all his home games there. How many roof shots does he have?

fquaye149
07-15-2005, 12:02 PM
sideways 8?


I dunno. That's a hard question to answer. He's had at least two I remember this year that would have had a shot...

cleanwsox
07-15-2005, 12:05 PM
Anybody know how long rooftop homer's were measured at? Even then you can't count everything over X amount of feet since you have to figure in the height factor of the home run. For example, LTP's 500 some foot home run wouldn't have been a roof shot since it was more of a line drive.

Baby Fisk
07-15-2005, 12:08 PM
Would Ditka have pitched any of those games?

TDog
07-15-2005, 12:13 PM
With all due respect to Ron Kittle and Greg Luzinski, before the 1980s, when home plate was moved, roof shots meant more. The way the ballpark was set up in 1972, when Dick Allen hit a roof shot AND put one in the old centerfield bleachers, swinging a 40-ounce bat, I wouldn't speculate that any human could ever do such a thing.

hold2dibber
07-15-2005, 01:19 PM
With all due respect to Ron Kittle and Greg Luzinski, before the 1980s, when home plate was moved, roof shots meant more. The way the ballpark was set up in 1972, when Dick Allen hit a roof shot AND put one in the old centerfield bleachers, swinging a 40-ounce bat, I wouldn't speculate that any human could ever do such a thing.

I was at a game in about '77 or so where Jim Rice hit a low, smoking line drive that appeared to me to still be rising when it hit the brick wall in straight away center (I think by that time they had put a fence in front of that brick wall to make CF homer runs more of a possibility). Hardest ball I've ever, ever seen hit.

kittle545feet
07-16-2005, 03:06 AM
With all due respect to Ron Kittle and Greg Luzinski, before the 1980s, when home plate was moved, roof shots meant more. The way the ballpark was set up in 1972, when Dick Allen hit a roof shot AND put one in the old centerfield bleachers, swinging a 40-ounce bat, I wouldn't speculate that any human could ever do such a thing.I don't want to disagree with you, so I won't because you are right. But, the homerun Kittle hit off of Boston's Rob Murphy in 1990 was the hardest hit ball I have ever seen. It would have been on the roof no matter where the plate was located. As a matter of fact, the ball I am speaking of is in the Sox Hall of Fame in the ball case. It has the date (sometime in April 1990) and a huge black scuff on the ball. You really can't miss it. But that homer was one of the few moments of perfection I have ever witnessed. It was like I was allowed to see the swing and contact in slow motion. That ball was smashed and even the crack of the bat was different from all other homers I had heard up until that time. It rose up into the night sky like a tee shot and it kept going and going and going...... All of Luzinski's and Kittle's roof shots to that point had been hit down the line. But this one was hit to left center, just to the right of the 382 power alley marker but on the roof. Go and look at the view from homeplate in the old park and think about what I just described. Amazing! I was lucky to be there to see it. My dad said that out of all the hundreds of homers he saw growing up by Mantle, Mays, and the like, that was the hardest and furthest hit ball he had seen in person. They used to replay it on the anniversary of the homer during Sox broadcasts but stopped doing that a few years back. That homerun is the reason I have Kittle545feet as my name on this site. The IBM Tale of The Tape said the homerun traveled 545 feet. That is how moved and amazed I was at that homer. If you are ever in the Hall of Fame, loook for the ball, it's pretty cool!

Parrothead
07-16-2005, 06:06 AM
With all due respect to Ron Kittle and Greg Luzinski, before the 1980s, when home plate was moved, roof shots meant more. The way the ballpark was set up in 1972, when Dick Allen hit a roof shot AND put one in the old centerfield bleachers, swinging a 40-ounce bat, I wouldn't speculate that any human could ever do such a thing.

Well actually seven people hit homers into the bleachers with George Bell of Toronto being the last.