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Fenway
07-12-2005, 04:05 PM
The All-Star Game isn't as important as it used to be but it certainly has provided some lasting memories.

These are my favorites

Ted Williams last time at fenway park 1999
http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/images/features/allstar/allstar_recaps/allstar_1999.jpg

Reggie Jackson's homer in 1971
http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/images/features/allstar/allstar_recaps/allstar_1971.jpg

Pete Rose runs into Ray Fosee 1970
http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/images/features/allstar/allstar_recaps/allstar_1970.jpg

Fred Lynn's Grand Slam 1983
http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/images/features/allstar/allstar1983.jpg

SOXPHILE
07-12-2005, 04:33 PM
The All-Star Game isn't as important as it used to be but it certainly has provided some lasting memories.

These are my favorites

Ted Williams last time at fenway park 1999
http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/images/features/allstar/allstar_recaps/allstar_1999.jpg

Reggie Jackson's homer in 1971
http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/images/features/allstar/allstar_recaps/allstar_1971.jpg

Pete Rose runs into Ray Fosee 1970
http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/images/features/allstar/allstar_recaps/allstar_1970.jpg

Fred Lynn's Grand Slam 1983
http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/images/features/allstar/allstar1983.jpg


Gotta admit, all the modern day All Stars gathered around Ted Williams was one of the coolest things I've seen. The word "hero" is used way to often, but he really was one, taking time out from baseball to serve as a pilot in both World War II and Korea.

Fenway
07-12-2005, 04:35 PM
Gotta admit, all the modern day All Stars gathered around Ted Williams was one of the coolest things I've seen. The word "hero" is used way to often, but he really was one, taking time out from baseball to serve as a pilot in both World War II and Korea.

John Glenn said Ted was the best pilot he ever saw.

SOXPHILE
07-12-2005, 04:40 PM
John Glenn said Ted was the best pilot he ever saw.

Amazing. Just think, he flew prop planes in WWII, then was re-trained and flew the F-86 Sabre in Korea. Was he an Ace (5 kills) in WW II. I thought I read that he was. Also, what did he fly ? P-47's, P-51's, P-38's ?

maurice
07-12-2005, 04:43 PM
A very wild Randy Johnson v. John "One-Nut" Kruk.

Bo Jackson's MVP performance.

Barry Bonds accosting Toriiiiii Hunter.

Selig's tie game.

Fenway
07-12-2005, 04:46 PM
Amazing. Just think, he flew prop planes in WWII, then was re-trained and flew the F-86 Sabre in Korea. Was he an Ace (5 kills) in WW II. I thought I read that he was. Also, what did he fly ? P-47's, P-51's, P-38's ?

Ted's military info

http://www.militarymuseum.org/Williams.html

Williams was first sent to the Navy's Preliminary Ground School at Amherst College, following the baseball season, for six months of instruction in various subjects including math and navigation. He achieved a 3.85 grade average out of a possible 4.0. The next four months were spent in the Preflight School at Athens, Georgia. From September to December 1943, Williams took primary training at NAS Bunker Hill, Indiana. He then went to Pensacola for intermediate training where he set records in aerial gunnery. Williams received his wings and commission in the Marine Corps on May 2, 1944.

Williams then attended gunnery training at Jacksonville where he once again set gunnery records. He then returned to Pensacola where he served as an instructor at Bronson Field. He played baseball for the base team, the Bronson Bombers, which won the Training Command championship that year. Due to an excess of cadets, instructors were mandated to washout one third of their students. Williams refused to washout good students for the sake of statistics and was called on the carpet for it. He stood his ground and replied: "If I think a kid is going to make a competent flyer, I won't wash him." From June to August 1945, Williams went through the Corsair Operational Training Unit at Jacksonville. He was in Hawaii awaiting orders as a replacement pilot when the war ended. Williams returned to the States in December and was discharged from the Marines on January 28, 1946.

Williams returned to the Red Sox in 1946 and took up where he had left off, leading the team to the World Series, and winning the MVP crown. In 1947 and 1948, he won the American League batting championship and was the MVP again in 1949. On May 2, 1952, Williams was recalled to active duty due to the Korean War. He was now 33 years old, married with a child, and had not flown in eight years. He resented being recalled and said so years later. Williams was not alone in his unhappiness - many other WW II veterans recalled for the Korean War had similar feelings. These veterans felt they had done their share in World War II and it was someone else's job to fight this war. Especially after they were well established in their careers and had families. Additional resentment was felt because the Navy and the Marines recalled members of the inactive reserves instead of active reserves. Mitchner referred to this situation in his work The Bridges at Toko-Ri. After completing jet refresher training in the F9F at Cherry Point, NC, Williams joined VMF-311 in Korea. He flew 37 combat missions and had a narrow escape when he crash-landed a flak damaged aircraft. Several missions were flown with John Glenn. Among the decorations he received was the Air Medal with two Gold Stars for meritorious achievement. Williams returned to the States and relieved from active duty on July 28, 1953.