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View Full Version : NPR Interview: 'Juicing the Game' Slams Baseball's Steroid Era


DrCrawdad
07-10-2005, 07:37 AM
http://www.npr.org/programs/wesat/features/2005/july/juicing.jpg
'Juicing the Game' Slams Baseball's Steroid Era

NPR interview with the author of the book. (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4736039)

The Racehorse
07-10-2005, 09:59 AM
Yet by the early 1990s the prevailing attitude was that the owners had lost control of the game. Every time they had gone head-to-head with the Players Association over the previous quarter century, they had not only lost, but somehow wound up looking like a bunch of chumps. The losses were so devastating to ownership that Atlanta Braves' owner Ted Turner once exclaimed during a particularly bitter session with his fellow owners, "Gentlemen, we have the only legal monopoly in the country and we're ****ing it up."

This seems like an interesting read... I'm definitely going to check it out.

davenicholson
07-24-2005, 12:43 PM
Has anybody finished this book? I've just started it, and after the first 70 pages or so, I'm thinking that it was ghost written by Marvin Miller. Essentially, owners are the epitome of evil and the cause of everything bad that has ever happened to baseball, while the players, their union and (especially) Marvin Miller are lionized. Throw in the playing of the race card now and then, and I'm seriously considering returning the book.

Someone tell me that the book gets better. Please tell me that the rest of the book becomes more even-handed. I really want to like the book, and am hoping that it would lend some closure for this old fart who still holds a grudge against the millionaires on both sides that screwed the fans in 1994, a slow-to-heal scar that Sosa, Giambi, Bonds and their ilk reopened.

Lip Man 1
07-24-2005, 09:14 PM
Dave:

Well given what the owners pulled off for nearly a hundred years before the advent of free agency after the 1975 season, my personal opinion is that the players should be allowed to screw em' for nearly a hundred years to even the score.

The list of greedy, dishonest owners is as long as my arm.

Lip

davenicholson
07-25-2005, 07:31 AM
Dave:

Well given what the owners pulled off for nearly a hundred years before the advent of free agency after the 1975 season, my personal opinion is that the players should be allowed to screw em' for nearly a hundred years to even the score.

The list of greedy, dishonest owners is as long as my arm.

Lip
Thanks for the reply, Lip. I know about the greedy scum billionnaire owners, and I agree with your assessment. I also believe that many, if not all owners knew about the steroid usage, but turned a blind eye to it because it was putting casual fan butts in the seats. Nothing like a 10-9 game, and hey, who cares who won, as long as Sosa or McGwire hit a homer? On the other hand, I wasn't expecting a book about MLB players juicing to be so one-sided as to be unreadable. I'm not going to waste any more of my time; I'm taking the book back. Besides, it's Dad's turn to read the latest Harry Potter book! :redneck

TommyJohn
07-25-2005, 08:16 AM
I really don't like to hear that "Let the players screw 'em for 75 more years."
Two wrongs don't make a right. The owners of today are not responsible for
what owners back in 1945 or 1895 did, and players aren't responsible for what
players of those eras did, either. Not that they shouldn't try to fix what was
broken, just simply that "let them keep doing it" is the wrong kind of thinking
and if the players think that way, neither side will accomplish anything.

I think both sides have pulled plenty of dirty crap, and they both have dirty
hands with the steroid scandal.

bigfoot
07-25-2005, 04:23 PM
Dave:

Well given what the owners pulled off for nearly a hundred years before the advent of free agency after the 1975 season, my personal opinion is that the players should be allowed to screw em' for nearly a hundred years to even the score.

The list of greedy, dishonest owners is as long as my arm.
Lip

Bingo! Has there been another business where the employees have to police themselves from receiving astronomical raises from idiot owners?
Can't we all relate to the prospect of having to turn down mega-money by contractually stopping you from accepting another offer from another employer?
I didn't notice any outgoing CEO/Prez of any Corp turning down his "golden parachute". No matter if he "batted" .230 or not.