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View Full Version : Terry Forster + Cy Acosta


Falstaff
07-06-2005, 01:30 AM
Our current powerhouse bullpen reminds me of mid 70's Cy Acosta Terry Forster
as the righty lefty team to shut down the A's. Different decade same concept.
W onder what they are doing now?:gulp:

TDog
07-06-2005, 02:57 AM
Forster came up at age 19, with a blazing fastball in 1971. I was at the park for his major league debut against the Twins on the first Sunday of the season, but he gained a certain heroic quality when he came in with the bases loaded and no one out with the score tied in the ninth against the Yankees in New York. He worked his way out of it. It didn't matter so much for his reputation that the Yankees pushed across a run in the 10th to win. Forster actually started a game or two. Gossage came up behind him. By 1972, Forster, Gossage, Acosta, Steve Kealy (the last White Sox pitcher to hit a home run) and veteran Vicente Romo were in the pen where in 1970 there seemed only Wilbur Wood. Wood was starting, at least twice a week, and you knew they wouldn't beat our bullpen.

Aside from a lot of Dick Allen and some Carlos May, there wasn't much offense, but I loved those early red pinstripes teams.

michned
07-06-2005, 07:18 AM
Aside from a lot of Dick Allen and some Carlos May, there wasn't much offense, but I loved those early red pinstripes teams.

I seem to remember Forster was a great hitter as well.

Just checking now, wow, the guy hit .397 for his career (31 for 78)!

TomBradley72
07-06-2005, 09:46 AM
Don't forget Bart Johnson!!!

TDog
07-06-2005, 09:55 AM
I seem to remember Forster was a great hitter as well.

Just checking now, wow, the guy hit .397 for his career (31 for 78)!

He was a singles hitter who hit around .500 when he was with the Sox. His average fell after he left. There were some bloop hits. He did come through as a pinch hitter, though.

I don't think he was doing much hitting by the time David Letterman was calling him the "big fat tub of goo."

wilburaga
07-06-2005, 12:17 PM
Forster came up at age 19, with a blazing fastball in 1971. I was at the park for his major league debut against the Twins on the first Sunday of the season, but he gained a certain heroic quality when he came in with the bases loaded and no one out with the score tied in the ninth against the Yankees in New York. He worked his way out of it. It didn't matter so much for his reputation that the Yankees pushed across a run in the 10th to win. Forster actually started a game or two. Gossage came up behind him. By 1972, Forster, Gossage, Acosta, Steve Kealy (the last White Sox pitcher to hit a home run) and veteran Vicente Romo were in the pen where in 1970 there seemed only Wilbur Wood. Wood was starting, at least twice a week, and you knew they wouldn't beat our bullpen.

Aside from a lot of Dick Allen and some Carlos May, there wasn't much offense, but I loved those early red pinstripes teams.

I was at that Yankee Stadium game when Forster worked out of the bases loaded, no out jam. Given that I was (and still am, for that matter) one month younger than TF, and also a southpaw, Terry remained one of my faves throughout his career. The Tub could hit, too, retiring with a .397 carrer average (31 for 78). The day Terry and the Goose went in the same deal was indeed a black one for me.

As for Cy Acosta, he whiffed his was into baseball history by being the first AL pitcher to bat in the DH era.


W

Lip Man 1
07-06-2005, 12:31 PM
There was one game in Chicago against the Twins where Forster came up in a bunt situation. The 3rd baseman was literally only ten feet or so from him when he decided to swing away. He drilled the ball off that guy's leg so hard it wound up in the Sox dugout on the fly!

Lip

Steakpita
07-06-2005, 01:06 PM
There was one game in Chicago against the Twins where Forster came up in a bunt situation. The 3rd baseman was literally only ten feet or so from him when he decided to swing away. He drilled the ball off that guy's leg so hard it wound up in the Sox dugout on the fly!

Lip


... wish we would do this more often against the Twins. Sorta the ultimate answer to "small ball" critics, isn't it?