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Fenway
06-29-2005, 06:34 PM
I guess we can thank ESPN for it

http://www.boston.com/sports/baseball/redsox/articles/2005/06/24/term_covers_all_the_bases?mode=PF

By Dan Shaughnessy, Globe Columnist | June 24, 2005

My 8-pound American Heritage dictionary (fourth edition, 2000) does not acknowledge walkoff as part of the English language. The big book's got Walkman, walk of life, walk-on, walkout, walkover, walk-through, walk-up, even Alice Walker.

But no walkoff -- even though this synthetic ''word" has become as much a part of baseball as the infield fly rule and the designated hitter. Walkoff was first used in reference to game-ending home runs, but now we see headlines and hear commentators talking about walkoff hits, walkoff walks, walkoff balks, walkoff hit-by-pitches, and walkoff errors.

If the game ends with the home team at bat, it's a walkoff win because the beaten visitors are forced to walk off the field in disgrace.

Few of today's major leaguers can remember when they first noticed the new terminology, but there's little doubt ESPN has put walkoff into the mainstream of American sports talk.

And who started the whole thing?

Dennis Eckersley, of course.

Chisox003
06-29-2005, 06:44 PM
I guess we can thank ESPN for it

http://www.boston.com/sports/baseball/redsox/articles/2005/06/24/term_covers_all_the_bases?mode=PF

By Dan Shaughnessy, Globe Columnist | June 24, 2005

My 8-pound American Heritage dictionary (fourth edition, 2000) does not acknowledge walkoff as part of the English language. The big book's got Walkman, walk of life, walk-on, walkout, walkover, walk-through, walk-up, even Alice Walker.

But no walkoff -- even though this synthetic ''word" has become as much a part of baseball as the infield fly rule and the designated hitter. Walkoff was first used in reference to game-ending home runs, but now we see headlines and hear commentators talking about walkoff hits, walkoff walks, walkoff balks, walkoff hit-by-pitches, and walkoff errors.

If the game ends with the home team at bat, it's a walkoff win because the beaten visitors are forced to walk off the field in disgrace.

Few of today's major leaguers can remember when they first noticed the new terminology, but there's little doubt ESPN has put walkoff into the mainstream of American sports talk.

And who started the whole thing?

Dennis Eckersley, of course.

I was very aware that the word "walkoff" was an espn thing...Thats the first place I heard it, and now everybody says it

Personally I dont like it, Ill stick to "game winning"

brewcrew/chisox
06-29-2005, 07:54 PM
The Japanese use the term "Sianara Homerun"; I like that one.

batmanZoSo
06-29-2005, 08:10 PM
Walk-off is more descriptive than game winning. It signifies that it was the ultimate of game winning plays--it simply ended the game. Walk-off may not be a word, but I think if you hyphenate it, it's not improper to use it.

ode to veeck
06-30-2005, 02:36 AM
I agree, saianara HR is more like it

Nellie_Fox
06-30-2005, 03:14 AM
A "game-winning" homer could come in the first inning. A "walk-off" homer makes everybody walk off the field.

It's sayonara.

Mr. White Sox
06-30-2005, 04:22 AM
actually, isn't it neither??? it could probably be transliterated to whatever you want, as long as the pronunciation stays intact...but yeah, sayonara more correctly describes the word. Am I right here, or am I just delving into something I know little about and sounding like an idiot?

MeanFish
06-30-2005, 10:02 AM
I'm a fan of the connotation behind the word "Walk-off." The only thing I don't like is how it's starting to be overused. A "Walk-off" should ONLY apply to home runs. You sometimes hear about "Walk-off doubles" and such, which is no good at all.

Nellie_Fox
07-01-2005, 01:13 AM
actually, isn't it neither??? it could probably be transliterated to whatever you want, as long as the pronunciation stays intact...but yeah, sayonara more correctly describes the word. Am I right here, or am I just delving into something I know little about and sounding like an idiot?I know that the Chinese government issues official spellings for their words, so that everyone spells them the same. Some years ago, they officially declared that what had always been Mao Tse Tung would henceforth be Mao Zedong, and the capitol city would no longer be spelled Peking, but would be Bejing.

Since I've seen Japanese words always spelled a certain way in English, I figured there was the same situation; an official proclamation of how to spell them. This is in contrast to many Arabic words, which are spelled differently in pretty much every publication you read (Koran, Quran, Q'ran, Khoran, etc.)

mjharrison72
07-01-2005, 10:06 AM
A "game-winning" homer could come in the first inning. A "walk-off" homer makes everybody walk off the field.

It's sayonara.
The problem is, it's ESPN's way of dumbing it down, rather than giving a couple of additional details that could better explain the situation: "He hit a game-winning three-run double in the bottom of the ninth." Instead, we get "Boo-ya, slammin' a walk-off double." It's absurd. ESPN is for people who want to be entertained, not informed.

The Racehorse
07-01-2005, 12:01 PM
I've never been enamored with the "walk-off" phrase. Trendiness equals boring.

Game ending homerun [or game ending anything] sums it up.

brewcrew/chisox
07-01-2005, 12:33 PM
A "game-winning" homer could come in the first inning. A "walk-off" homer makes everybody walk off the field.

It's sayonara.


Having lived in Japan, I've seen Romangi (the word describing Japanese language written with the Roman alphabet) used with different spellings for Japanese words, so I don't know if there is a "national spelling" like you say there is in China. However, your spelling of the word as "sayonara" is the most common one for a "walkoff", and the one I should have used in my original post (its been a few years since I've been back and the spelling slipped my mind).

On a similar note, those interested in knowing other baseball words in Japanese (something to yell at Shingo and Tadahito), here is a pretty useful site that includes phrases for both hitting and pitching with proper pronunciation

link (http://baseballguru.com/jalbright/japanesebaseballprimer.htm)