PDA

View Full Version : Game Notes 6/18/05 LAD @ CWS


Fenway
06-18-2005, 04:32 PM
http://presspass.mlb.com/images/logo_cws_small.gif (http://presspass.mlb.com/pp_main.asp?d=23535)
http://presspass.mlb.com/docs/77/109/1700_1179.pdf
http://presspass.mlb.com/images/logo_la_small.gif (http://presspass.mlb.com/pp_main.asp?d=23532)
http://presspass.mlb.com/docs/77/117/2500_1230.pdf

RallyBowl
06-18-2005, 04:52 PM
Thanks Fenway. Do all of those monster batting averages in interleague play confirm my belief that the NL pitching is inferior or AL batting is superior?

Fenway
06-18-2005, 04:55 PM
Thanks Fenway. Do all of those monster batting averages in interleague play confirm my belief that the NL pitching ( or AL batting ) is superior?

Impossible to figure out.

NL teams AT WORST play their own game and can only be helped by the DH

AL teams in most cases are hurt by the pitcher batting.

malbert346
06-18-2005, 05:39 PM
Impossible to figure out.

NL teams AT WORST play their own game and can only be helped by the DH

AL teams in most cases are hurt by the pitcher batting.


I've been reading this board for two years without posting but I have to respond to this one. IMO, no team has a clear cut advantage in interleague play because each team is constructed for their respective league play. Obviously, a national league team does not normally keep a big bopper to be used as a DH because there is no DH in the NL. So, when they are forced to use one, they have to put in a regular pinch hitter who usually doesn't bat often and therefore does not fare much better than the pitcher. He doesn't always bat as the DH, but the point is that he has to be put in the field or lineup somewhere since the pitcher doesn't bat. It isn't enough of an improvement over the pitcher batting to call it an advantage for the NL.

Another reason is that with the number of double switches that go on in the NL, the pinch hitters usually end up playing the field at some point in the game. This means that there aren't many guys in the NL that focus solely on hitting like an AL DH. Again, no clear cut advantage over having a DH in your lineup because no one is suited to play it. It would seem then that by putting a player in a role he's not accustomed to, it can in fact hurt your team quite a bit. Does this make sense to anyone?

munchman33
06-18-2005, 05:46 PM
I've been reading this board for two years without posting but I have to respond to this one. IMO, no team has a clear cut advantage in interleague play because each team is constructed for their respective league play. Obviously, a national league team does not normally keep a big bopper to be used as a DH because there is no DH in the NL. So, when they are forced to use one, they have to put in a regular pinch hitter who usually doesn't bat often and therefore does not fare much better than the pitcher. He doesn't always bat as the DH, but the point is that he has to be put in the field or lineup somewhere since the pitcher doesn't bat. It isn't enough of an improvement over the pitcher batting to call it an advantage for the NL.

Another reason is that with the number of double switches that go on in the NL, the pinch hitters usually end up playing the field at some point in the game. This means that there aren't many guys in the NL that focus solely on hitting like an AL DH. Again, no clear cut advantage over having a DH in your lineup because no one is suited to play it. It would seem then that by putting a player in a role he's not accustomed to, it can in fact hurt your team quite a bit. Does this make sense to anyone?

Many A.L. teams spend big money and build their offenses around the D.H. in their lineup. They then spend less money on other areas. This is a serious disadvantage.

N.L. clubs, reliant on the pinch hitter, already have an extra bat who doesn't play the field much, so coming into A.L. parks doesn't hinder then at all.

Fenway
06-18-2005, 05:51 PM
Then you see pitchers like Wade Miller and Tim Wakefield hit the ball well at Wrigley and you throw the spreadsheets away.

I would still like to see in interleague the visiting teams rules apply during a game. It would give fans in one team cities a taste of the other leagues game.

malbert346
06-18-2005, 05:53 PM
It doesn't hinder them in that they have an extra guy. But, he doesn't nearly provide the run scoring power an AL DH does in his own park. You don't hear about many guys who make a living coming off the bench as pinch hitters all the time in the NL. If most NL teams had a guy who hit bombs every time he subbed for someone, then it's an advantage. But they don't. An NL team does not put the money into it while the AL does as you mentioned earlier. So the NL team isn't going to get a huge advantage from having someone other than the pitcher bat. Can it be an advantage? Yes, the potential is there. Is it in reality, though? Not nearly as much the media makes it out to be. Check some stats and you'll see what I mean.

RallyBowl
06-18-2005, 09:14 PM
I've been reading this board for two years without posting but I have to respond to this one. IMO, no team has a clear cut advantage in interleague play because each team is constructed for their respective league play. Obviously, a national league team does not normally keep a big bopper to be used as a DH because there is no DH in the NL. So, when they are forced to use one, they have to put in a regular pinch hitter who usually doesn't bat often and therefore does not fare much better than the pitcher. He doesn't always bat as the DH, but the point is that he has to be put in the field or lineup somewhere since the pitcher doesn't bat. It isn't enough of an improvement over the pitcher batting to call it an advantage for the NL.

Another reason is that with the number of double switches that go on in the NL, the pinch hitters usually end up playing the field at some point in the game. This means that there aren't many guys in the NL that focus solely on hitting like an AL DH. Again, no clear cut advantage over having a DH in your lineup because no one is suited to play it. It would seem then that by putting a player in a role he's not accustomed to, it can in fact hurt your team quite a bit. Does this make sense to anyone?All I read was the first sentence. I'm really not too sure I should value your opinion.:dtroll:

malbert346
06-18-2005, 10:19 PM
All I read was the first sentence. I'm really not too sure I should value your opinion.:dtroll:

You've only been here since June of 2005 according to the board. And you call me a troll.

Tragg
06-18-2005, 10:21 PM
I've been reading this board for two years without posting but I have to respond to this one. IMO, no team has a clear cut advantage in interleague play because each team is constructed for their respective league play. Obviously, a national league team does not normally keep a big bopper to be used as a DH because there is no DH in the NL.
No the NL teams don't have DHs, but they do have bench hitters who get work during the season. AL pitchers DO NOT BAT during the season. That is an advantage.

Cubbiesuck13
06-18-2005, 10:49 PM
Malbert, I see what you are getting at but I don't agree. Most teams, AL or NL, have a position battle that isn't settled by the end of spring training meaning at least two guys have the ability to play everyday. Certainly this is an advantage.


Fenway, I love the idea. As long as we are doing interleague play for the fans then why not?