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View Full Version : How to call a Strike!


White Sox Josh
06-11-2005, 12:40 PM
Is it just me or are the Umps calling strikes based on where or how the catchers catch the ball. That's not how it is supposed to be done. I'm an Ump and the first thing we were taught was to call the pitch on where it crossed the plate. Case in point was Wednesday's game: When Shingo was pitching in the Ninth the 2 pitches before the HR to Closser were clearly strikes yet since Widger caught it outside of the plate they were called balls. Also this happened in the Red Sawx-Flubs game yesterday. You call the pitches on where it crosses the plate.

LongLiveFisk
06-11-2005, 01:34 PM
I see that sometimes, which is definitely annoying but the other thing I see which drives me crazy is the tendency for the ump to want to "even up" the count. For instance, if the batter has a 2-1 count the next pitch will likely be called a strike unless it's way outside. As long as it's borderline he'll call a strike 99% of the time. Same thing if the batter has a 0-1 count or especially an 0-2 count that pitch has to be perfect unless it will be called a ball. I've seen the batter not get rung up on almost perfect pitches. Gotta even up the count! I was talking about this with my brothers and nephew and they said they notice the same thing.

TaylorStSox
06-11-2005, 01:35 PM
Welcome to 1975. It's been like this for years. There's a reason for this. The MLB realizes that runs draw casual fans. The smaller the zone, the more runs. It's just the way it is. That's why they lowered the mound and juiced the ball. It's also why they ignored steroids for years.

StillMissOzzie
06-11-2005, 01:54 PM
Is it just me or are the Umps calling strikes based on where or how the catchers catch the ball. That's not how it is supposed to be done. I'm an Ump and the first thing we were taught was to call the pitch on where it crossed the plate. Case in point was Wednesday's game: When Shingo was pitching in the Ninth the 2 pitches before the HR to Closser were clearly strikes yet since Widger caught it outside of the plate they were called balls. Also this happened in the Red Sawx-Flubs game yesterday. You call the pitches on where it crosses the plate.

:hawk
"Dadgum right. I've been saying for years how hard it is to get a good curveball called a strike. Mercy!"

SMO
:D:

Rocklive99
06-11-2005, 02:09 PM
My biggest thing is consistency, hitters will adjust, but be consistent! E.g. Last night, early in the game, I would've struck out Dye on that one outside/close pitch, but it was called the ball. Okay, that's his zone, but a couple batters later, a ball more outside than that was was called a strike, I hate that! Maybe nitpicking, but be consistent!

Even in little league, there was one ump who loved the low strike, he'd call it on pitches that hit the plate before reaching the catcher. As ridiculous as that was, it was consistent, so I knew that something borderline high would be a ball and to protect the plate on something low

fquaye149
06-11-2005, 02:27 PM
My biggest thing is consistency, hitters will adjust, but be consistent! E.g. Last night, early in the game, I would've struck out Dye on that one outside/close pitch, but it was called the ball. Okay, that's his zone, but a couple batters later, a ball more outside than that was was called a strike, I hate that! Maybe nitpicking, but be consistent!

Even in little league, there was one ump who loved the low strike, he'd call it on pitches that hit the plate before reaching the catcher. As ridiculous as that was, it was consistent, so I knew that something borderline high would be a ball and to protect the plate on something low

The thing about watching on TV and trying to judge balls and strikes is that that camera in the outfield is NOT right behind the pitcher. Therefore, things are at an angle. When they show the overhead view you can notice that balls that looked like strikes on the outside corner might have actually been an inch or more off the plate. All you can really judge on TV is how high or low a pitch is. I would wager that that pitch Dye wasn't rung up on was actually off the plate by a decent amount.

PicktoCLick72
06-11-2005, 06:18 PM
Every ump will have his zone. Consistancy is the most important thing for an ump. A small zone will tick me off, but an inconsistent one will drive me crazy.

buehrle4cy05
06-11-2005, 07:10 PM
You have to look at the pitch. I ump kids ages 9-12, and with all of the kids, you can follow the ball over the plate. Only a few of the kids have a curveball, but even with that, it's still slow enough to get over. In the majors, when you have 90+mph fastballs coming in, pitches on the corner probably will have to be looked at in the catcher's glove. However, curveballs, changeups, and all other pitches below 90mph can be followed.

White Sox Josh
06-11-2005, 08:16 PM
You have to look at the pitch. I ump kids ages 9-12, and with all of the kids, you can follow the ball over the plate. Only a few of the kids have a curveball, but even with that, it's still slow enough to get over. In the majors, when you have 90+mph fastballs coming in, pitches on the corner probably will have to be looked at in the catcher's glove. However, curveballs, changeups, and all other pitches below 90mph can be followed.yeah and Shingo's pitches that night were at the most 86 MPH but some of the pitches that were called balls that were really strikes were 55-60 MPH.