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mcfish
06-08-2005, 05:06 PM
This is a quote from the Carl Everett tinfoil hat schedule thread. Interleague play is national league favored because of the DH rules.I have always disagreed with this statement. I would think it would be the exact opposite.

In NL parks, the AL teams lose a hitter, but it's not like the NL teams have an extra one. NL pitchers are for the most part extremely crappy hitters, except for the occasional bunt I just don't see how it's that big of an advantage.

In AL parks, on the other hand, AL teams have their hitter back, for most teams a guy who is on the roster just to hit and to do so well. NL teams don't have this person on their roster - they have to use one of their bench players in the game for the extra spot. The role players are usually defensive backups, speedsters, maybe a good pinch hitter. Not the caliber of a starting AL DH though.

I'm just wondering what other people's thoughts on this are. Who really has the advantage in interleague play, or is it just another baseball game?

Mickster
06-08-2005, 05:22 PM
NL is at an advantage if for nothing else than NL pitchers having experience hitting on a semi-regular basis whereas AL pitchers have virtually none. Remember that there are NL pitchers that put up solid ABs. There are currently 22 NL pitchers with a min. of 13 AB's with a BA over .220. You can call it "bunk" and say that 20-30 AB's is not a good sample size but an NL SP will only have about 25-30 AB's at this point in the year if he's staying deep into games.

mcfish
06-08-2005, 05:26 PM
NL is at an advantage if for nothing else than NL pitchers having experience hitting on a semi-regular basis whereas AL pitchers have virtually none. Remember that there are NL pitchers that put up solid ABs. There are currently 22 NL pitchers with a min. of 13 AB's with a BA over .220. You can call it "bunk" and say that 20-30 AB's is not a good sample size but an NL SP will only have about 25-30 AB's at this point in the year if he's staying deep into games.I'm not saying that the NL has no advantage at all. I agree that that is an advantage, but I think that it is outweighed by the AL advantage of having 9 starting offensive players on the roster instead of 8 when the games are in AL parks. There's 16 teams in the NL with 5 starters each, all of whom should have 13+ AB's. In my opinion 22 not quite awful hitters out of 80+ is not that big of an advantage compared to having the ninth "starter" on the roster.

sdccpa
06-08-2005, 06:42 PM
I think the advantage is to the NL. The AL pitchers don't even think about hitting until they're getting ready to go to an NL park. The NL pitchers working on hitting a little more often.

He gone
06-08-2005, 08:58 PM
Did you hear what Crusty Baker said?

He said the Scrubs don't have an advantage in interleauge play because all the AL teams watch them on TV. They are scouting them :o:

RKMeibalane
06-08-2005, 09:07 PM
Did you hear what Crusty Baker said?

He said the Scrubs don't have an advantage in interleauge play because all the AL teams watch them on TV. They are scouting them :o:

The next intelligent comment from Dusty Baker will be his first.

StillMissOzzie
06-09-2005, 02:34 AM
I'm not saying that the NL has no advantage at all. I agree that that is an advantage, but I think that it is outweighed by the AL advantage of having 9 starting offensive players on the roster instead of 8 when the games are in AL parks. There's 16 teams in the NL with 5 starters each, all of whom should have 13+ AB's. In my opinion 22 not quite awful hitters out of 80+ is not that big of an advantage compared to having the ninth "starter" on the roster.

Don't you think that the NL teams have somebody on their bench, who normally serves as a pinch-hitter, to serve as DH for the interleague games in the AL parks? I would think that the NL teams can do so and be even stronger offensively than normal. Of course, if they have a pitcher that swings a big stick, they can leave him in there to bat instead. Maybe someday soon, defending the purity of the NL version of baseball, we'll see a NL manager leave their pitcher in to bat for a whole interleague series. But I'm not holding my breath. IMHO,

AL in NL park: AL team at disadvantage, NL team is as usual
NL is AL park: NL team >= normal. AL team is as usual

SMO
:gulp:

Mr. White Sox
06-09-2005, 02:44 AM
the only problem with that logic is the fact that NL bench players are, for the most part, very inferior to AL DH's. There's a reason why Frank Thomas is an AL DH, as well as David Ortiz and others...their salary is too large for an NL team to just pay them to be a bench player.

StockdaleForVeep
06-09-2005, 02:47 AM
It takes a valued bat out of an AL lineup

Look now tho with DH, sox have to bench either carl or thomas every game or someone else

Most teams have bench players who are good who platoon or are backups but are still good enough to make a difference.

nasox
06-09-2005, 02:50 AM
Our pitchers have hit pretty well so far this year.

ShoelessJoeS
06-09-2005, 02:51 AM
i think the team that has the advantage in interleague play is the home team, period. AL teams play their own game as does NL teams. IMO, homefield advantage doubles in interleague play...unless youre playing the rockies at coors that is

StillMissOzzie
06-09-2005, 03:10 AM
Did you hear what Crusty Baker said?

He said the Scrubs don't have an advantage in interleauge play because all the AL teams watch them on TV. They are scouting them :o:

Did he really say this? If so, he is the north end of a southbound horse. And if he is so concerned, maybe more sCrUB players should be scouting and watching video instead of soaking up the Wrigleyville night life.

SMO
:gulp:

MUsoxfan
06-09-2005, 03:41 AM
The NL is at the disadvantage. They don't have Cliff Politte :D:

Foulke You
06-09-2005, 04:06 AM
Did he really say this? If so, he is the north end of a southbound horse. And if he is so concerned, maybe more sCrUB players should be scouting and watching video instead of soaking up the Wrigleyville night life.

SMO
:gulp:
He did indeed say this. I read it in the Sun-Times.

He gone
06-09-2005, 06:34 AM
Did he really say this? If so, he is the north end of a southbound horse.



YES!

He's the same guy that said White Guys have a rough time playing all the day games in the heat at Wrigley :cool:

DrCrawdad
06-09-2005, 07:52 AM
NL teams have an distinct advantage when playing by NL rules. NL teams are built to play NL style baseball, AL teams are not. While most NL pitchers are not much with the bat, they at least get about 3 ABs most games, so they're accustomed to what's required of them. How useful is most any AL pitcher going to be when they get only 3-6 ABs per year?

If it's not an advantage to play by your "house" rules then something is wrong.

IMHO though when NL teams play by AL rules the advantage to the AL team is minimal. All NL teams have to do is put their best hitter (weakest fielder) as DH.

Take the Cubbies for example. When they play in the AL this year all they have to do is put Todd Walker as DH and put Hairston at 2nd or Dubois as DH and put Hairston/Hollandsworth in LF. Those simple moves don't hurt the Cubbies at all, in fact they'll have a better fielding team and one more hitter. IMHO in this case at least, their is no disadvantage to the Cubbies by playing by the AL rules.