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View Full Version : SI article about Frank and Juan Gone


ChiSox14305635
06-03-2005, 01:21 PM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/writers/stephen_cannella/06/03/juangone.hurt/index.html

Not a bad article, but I would have to slightly disagree with one quote:

Over his career the 37-year-old Thomas has become something of a connoisseur of leg injuries

There was the injury in '99 when Frank had to shut it down in late August, and last year. IIRC, at one time, after Ripken finally sat, Frank held the active record for most games played.

doublem23
06-03-2005, 01:22 PM
I could have sworn that Craig Biggio became the the active consecutive games played leader when Ripken shut it down.

mweflen
06-03-2005, 01:24 PM
Juan Gone couldn't hold Frank's jock strap.

RKMeibalane
06-03-2005, 02:21 PM
I could have sworn that Craig Biggio became the the active consecutive games played leader when Ripken shut it down.

That's what I remember, as well.

ChicagoHoosier
06-03-2005, 02:25 PM
I just came to the board to post the same thing. As much as I love Frank, this article sure points out the disappointment. But, maybe it's just me, but it seems Frank hasn't be as injured as Juan Gone. Thomas as recently as two years ago, was in tip-top form. I can't remember the last productive season for Juan Gone.

Anyone notice when they compared the stats how much higher Frank's OBP was?

MUScholar21
06-03-2005, 02:26 PM
What bothers me is that they make Frank's numbers sound BAD. A .429 OBP for his career? Franchises would kill for that from a player for 15 years. 1440 RBIs for his career? Over the 14 years he has been in the bigs (and that counts two very short seasons due to injury, AND two seasons shortened by a strike) that amounts to 102 RBIs per season. Those are sick numbers. The only way Frank will ever be able to convince people he is Hall of Fame worthy is hitting 500 HRs, and that isn't even guaranteed to make it in, thanks to steroids and the juiced ball.

RKMeibalane
06-03-2005, 02:26 PM
I just came to the board to post the same thing. As much as I love Frank, this article sure points out the disappointment. But, maybe it's just me, but it seems Frank hasn't be as injured as Juan Gone. Thomas as recently as two years ago, was in tip-top form. I can't remember the last productive season for Juan Gone.

Anyone notice when they compared the stats how much higher Frank's OBP was?

I don't think anyone disputes that Thomas is the better player. That article was probably nothing more than the product of a strange coincidince. If Frank doesn't tweak his hip on Monday, that article never gets written, or maybe it's written about Gonzalez and Jeff Bagwell. And, for the record, I think Bagwell wins that battle, too.

RKMeibalane
06-03-2005, 02:28 PM
What bothers me is that they make Frank's numbers sound BAD. A .429 OBP for his career? Franchises would kill for that from a player for 15 years. 1440 RBIs for his career? Over the 14 years he has been in the bigs (and that counts two very short seasons due to injury, AND two seasons shortened by a strike) that amounts to 102 RBIs per season. Those are sick numbers. The only way Frank will ever be able to convince people he is Hall of Fame worthy is hitting 500 HRs, and that isn't even guaranteed to make it in, thanks to steroids and the juiced ball.

I think people's standards for numbers have been scewed by steroid use. People expect to see an OPS of 1.110, rather than .900, which was considered extremely good in the past. People also expect 40+ homers from every power hitter. I can remember when twenty home runs meant something. In fact, I can remember when it meant a lot.

maurice
06-03-2005, 02:54 PM
Only an imbecile would contend that Frank Thomas does not deserve to be in the HOF. If they keep him out, they might as well close the doors. Even if he retired today, his credentials would far eclipse scores of HOF members.

Frank has a career OPS of .996. He posted an OPS of .997 as recently as last year. He's posted an OPS over 1.000 an amazing 7 times, including a mind-boggling OPS of 1.217 before they pulled the plug on 1994. He's hit 40+ HRs 5 times and totaled 436 HR so far to go along with 2,113 hits, 1,452 walks, 444 2B, 11 3B, 3,887 TB, 32 SB, 1,439 RBI, and 1,309 runs scored. He also has 2.9 MVPs and a batting title (despite standing 6'5). Though he's spent his career hitting in front of very good hitters, he's been intentionally walked 162 times and has a career .789 K/BB ratio -- exceptional for any hitter in today's game but especially for a power hitter.

For those who hate on Frank because he's currently a DH, he's played 971 games at 1B (more than at DH) with a .991 FPCT.

jackbrohamer
06-03-2005, 03:51 PM
A ruptured triceps and ankle surgeries aren't "leg injuries."

Deadguy
06-03-2005, 05:02 PM
There was the injury in '99 when Frank had to shut it down in late August, and last year. IIRC, at one time, after Ripken finally sat, Frank held the active record for most games played.

Nope. That was Albert Belle, back in 1998. I remember reading a hilarious article which envisioned Albert breaking Ripken's record in 2011, with about as much fanfare as John Rocker received when he pitched in Shea Stadium.

I think Frank was 2nd at one point, before he got injured in 1996 and had to go on the DL.

Deadguy
06-03-2005, 05:10 PM
Anyone notice when they compared the stats how much higher Frank's OBP was?

And notice how he said "'ignoring' the on base factors, the two are very similar."

What a load of garbage. As if having nearly 1,000 more walks is of insignificant value. :rolleyes: