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FedEx227
05-24-2005, 11:37 AM
Hey, I'm currently writing an essay on the history of baseball statistics. I was wondering if a few of you guys could answer some questions that I could later use in my essay. Thanks. I just need a short/long answer and then your real name. Thanks again guys...

1) How do you feel baseball statistics have impacted today's game?

2) Would baseball be as prominant in America without statistics?

So if a few of you guys could answer that would be a big help, thanks :)

mikehuff
05-24-2005, 11:44 AM
1. Statistics are directly tied in with salaries. That's how you judge how these people get paid in relation to each other. Numbers are everything.

2. Statistics have been with the game for well over a hundred years. They keep the games popularity because of the fact that different eras can be compared, even though there is still some debate about the comparisons from era to era. Stats in baseball are more meaningful than stats in any other sport.

StillMissOzzie
05-24-2005, 12:27 PM
1. Statistics are directly tied in with salaries. That's how you judge how these people get paid in relation to each other. Numbers are everything.

2. Statistics have been with the game for well over a hundred years. They keep the games popularity because of the fact that different eras can be compared, even though there is still some debate about the comparisons from era to era. Stats in baseball are more meaningful than stats in any other sport.

1) And how. Statistics are used both by free agents, to justify their asking price as well as in arbitration hearings, to justify why Player A should get paid as much as Player B

2) Stats provide a common ground for discussion among fans, a basis for the betting line (although much more so in football, IMHO), as well as the link cited by mikehuff to compare prior generations with current players.

SMO
:gulp:

TwinKess
05-24-2005, 12:59 PM
If you want to use a good example of how some teams are using statistics to their advantage, I would highly suggest reading Moneyball by Michael Lewis. It is about how the Oakleand As decided that people were using the wrong statistics to judge players, and how they used that information to create winning teams.

Baby Fisk
05-24-2005, 01:01 PM
If you want to use a good example of how some teams are using statistics to their advantage, I would highly suggest reading Moneyball by Michael Lewis. It is about how the Oakleand As decided that people were using the wrong statistics to judge players, and how they used that information to create winning teams.

This book may have been discussed here before. Does anyone recall? :cool:

BaseballTonyght
05-24-2005, 01:08 PM
This book may have been discussed here before. Does anyone recall? :cool:

Is that the one about the 60-something GM who spits sunflower seeds at his prospects to see what sticks? :rolleyes:

Baby Fisk
05-24-2005, 01:11 PM
Is that the one about the 60-something GM who spits sunflower seeds at his prospects to see what sticks? :rolleyes:

It had something to do with letting all your talent seek big-budget winfalls with other teams, while you bet the farm each year that your prospects will win a championship for you... :cool:

FarWestChicago
05-24-2005, 01:45 PM
If you want to use a good example of how some teams are using statistics to their advantage, I would highly suggest reading Moneyball by Michael Lewis. It is about how the Oakleand As decided that people were using the wrong statistics to judge players, and how they used that information to create winning teams.I guess this years A's forgot to read the book in the offseason. :D:

Flight #24
05-24-2005, 02:50 PM
I guess this years A's forgot to read the book in the offseason. :D:

What's hilarious is that when Jerry Krause cut bait with Elton Brand to pick up the Twin Towers of Curry & Chandler, there were those who rightly wondered if he was trying to buy time before people realized how his initial plan failed and keep from getting fired.

But no one seems to wonder how after missing his window with his initial crew and seeing his genius fail to come to fruition, Beane has just done the same thing. He's even saying things like "I'd do it again, these were long-haul deals". It may be true, but when you don't make even 1 WS with 3 ace pitchers who were dirt cheap for 6-7 years.....well, you'd think there would be some concern about having "squandered the opportunity".

FedEx227
05-24-2005, 06:00 PM
Hey guys thanks for your answers I will try to use them in my piece.

If you want to use a good example of how some teams are using statistics to their advantage, I would highly suggest reading Moneyball by Michael Lewis. It is about how the Oakleand As decided that people were using the wrong statistics to judge players, and how they used that information to create winning teams.

Yeah don't worry thats what this whole essay was based on. We were suppose to a read a book, I read Moneyball, then come up with an inquiry question from that, that became what was the history of baseball statistics. Thanks again for answering my questions it was a great help.

Scott Hatteberg PICKIN' MACHINE! :)