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View Full Version : For my info-what is the Mendoza line?


whitesoxfan1986
05-16-2005, 05:12 PM
I have heard people talking about hitting at "the Mendoza line" and I have questions about it: what is the batting average that is considered the Mendoza line? and Why is it named after this guy and who is he?

RKMeibalane
05-16-2005, 05:17 PM
I have heard people talking about hitting at "the Mendoza line" and I have questions about it: what is the batting average that is considered the Mendoza line? and Why is it named after this guy and who is he?

The Mendoza line is represented by a .200 batting average. It's named after a former Major League player named Hector Mendoza, who struggled to hit .200 for his career.

SoxFan76
05-16-2005, 05:54 PM
The Mendoza line is represented by a .200 batting average. It's named after a former Major League player named Hector Mendoza, who struggled to hit .200 for his career.

Actually, I believe it was Mario Mendoza, and he had a career .215 batting average. I think I remember reading that Mendoza is very upset that this phrase is so common.

Oddly enough, Bob Eucker in 6 seasons had a career .200 average on the dot. Does Eucker joke about this or do other people joke about this at his expense? I forget what the whole story is.

The Racehorse
05-17-2005, 02:54 PM
Actually, I believe it was Mario Mendoza, and he had a career .215 batting average. I think I remember reading that Mendoza is very upset that this phrase is so common.

Oddly enough, Bob Eucker in 6 seasons had a career .200 average on the dot. Does Eucker joke about this or do other people joke about this at his expense? I forget what the whole story is.

Your exactly right when saying the Mendoza line is at .215. :thumbsup:

Most people say the Mendoza line is at .200... and most are wrong. :cool:

Btw, Uecker is how it's spelled... and he really did have a career batting average of .200. Also, Uecker never hit a triple or had a stolen base at the major league level... Uke rules! :)

AZChiSoxFan
05-17-2005, 04:28 PM
Your exactly right when saying the Mendoza line is at .215. :thumbsup:

Most people say the Mendoza line is at .200... and most are wrong. :cool:



I disagree. Mendoza's career BA was in fact .215, but whenever a sportscaster refers to the Mendoza line, he is referring to someone batting .200. Check out this link:

http://members.tripod.com/~alpepper/mendozaline.html

Interestingly, Wimpy is given credit for coining the phrase.

On a similar note, IIRC, last year someone here at WSI started referring to a BA of .150 as the Borchard line.

ExpoPuddingHead
05-17-2005, 04:54 PM
Now i was just writting about this somewhere else. While Mario Mendoza is the most famous of the batting Mendozas there is another little known mendoza. This mendoza played mostly in the minor leagues, his career major league batting average being .185. the Average of .185 and .215= .200 thus the mendoza line is the average of the mendozas.

SomebodyToldMe
05-17-2005, 06:25 PM
On a similar note, IIRC, last year someone here at WSI started referring to a BA of .150 as the Borchard line.

HAHAHAHAHAHA

That's gold!

TornLabrum
05-17-2005, 07:15 PM
I disagree. Mendoza's career BA was in fact .215, but whenever a sportscaster refers to the Mendoza line, he is referring to someone batting .200. Check out this link:

http://members.tripod.com/~alpepper/mendozaline.html

Interestingly, Wimpy is given credit for coining the phrase.

On a similar note, IIRC, last year someone here at WSI started referring to a BA of .150 as the Borchard line.

That would be me.

RKMeibalane
05-17-2005, 07:34 PM
Actually, I believe it was Mario Mendoza, and he had a career .215 batting average. I think I remember reading that Mendoza is very upset that this phrase is so common.

Oddly enough, Bob Eucker in 6 seasons had a career .200 average on the dot. Does Eucker joke about this or do other people joke about this at his expense? I forget what the whole story is.

Thank you. I couldn't remember his first name, and was too lazy to look it up. I think .100 should be the Royce Clayton line, since he was below that mark in May of 2001.

A. Cavatica
05-17-2005, 08:10 PM
someone here at WSI started referring to a BA of .150 as the Borchard line.

The Borchard line is .182...but it's drawn 500 feet from home plate.

The Racehorse
05-17-2005, 09:54 PM
I disagree. Mendoza's career BA was in fact .215, but whenever a sportscaster refers to the Mendoza line, he is referring to someone batting .200. Check out this link:

http://members.tripod.com/~alpepper/mendozaline.html



The intent of the phrase had more to do with what players were below Mendoza's name in the .batting average listing than an actual batting average. Again, just because more people use the .200 mark doesn't make it the quote-unquote right one.

I did enjoy the link.

SoxFan76
05-17-2005, 11:36 PM
Your exactly right when saying the Mendoza line is at .215. :thumbsup:

Most people say the Mendoza line is at .200... and most are wrong. :cool:

Btw, Uecker is how it's spelled... and he really did have a career batting average of .200. Also, Uecker never hit a triple or had a stolen base at the major league level... Uke rules! :)

Ah, ok. I have a buddy with the last name "Eucker" (pronounced the same way), so that's why I had the spelling error.

Mendoza Line
05-18-2005, 07:52 AM
:)Someone rang?

ondafarm
05-18-2005, 08:08 AM
I disagree. Mendoza's career BA was in fact .215, but whenever a sportscaster refers to the Mendoza line, he is referring to someone batting .200.

The morons who do the Braves broadcast are responsible for the conversion of the Mendoza line from .215 to .200, they're lucky they talk so good because they can't do a thing with numbers.

I'd always heard it was Tommy Lasorda who gave Wimpy the idea. Supposedly, Lasorda was asked if Mendoza hurt his team, being a good glove, no hit player. Lasorda supposedly replied that Mendoza didn't hurt the offense but if his batting average fell any further it would be a drag on the team.

StillMissOzzie
05-20-2005, 12:06 AM
The morons who do the Braves broadcast are responsible for the conversion of the Mendoza line from .215 to .200, they're lucky they talk so good because they can't do a thing with numbers.


Say what? I've always understood "the Mendoza line" to be .200, and I hardly ever listen to the Braves, so they had nothing to do with it. While Mario may have been permanently tainted by having his name become unfairly associated with borderline batting incompetence, if in fact his lifetime BA was .215, I doubt that the Braves announcers had anything to do with it.

SMO
:gulp:

elrod
05-20-2005, 01:11 AM
I believe George Brett was the one who coined it. He used to say, "As long as my batting average is above Mendoz'a line" then I'm OK. He was referring to Mario Mendoza's perennially poor batting average. It now tends to mean batting under .200. BTW, some good high school friends of mine are in a band called "The Mendoza Line".

The Racehorse
05-20-2005, 07:42 AM
BTW, some good high school friends of mine are in a band called "The Mendoza Line".

Hey... that's pretty cool! :D:

TDog
05-20-2005, 10:34 AM
I believe George Brett was the one who coined it. He used to say, "As long as my batting average is above Mendoz'a line" then I'm OK. He was referring to Mario Mendoza's perennially poor batting average. ...

This sounds like it could be authentic. As I understand it, this was something that came from players and picked up by the media. Tommy Lasorda could have had something to do with it because he humiliated his players with humor. I don't know who came up with the line, just as I'm sure that some of the quotes attributed to Yogi Berra came from other people in baseball.

What I do know is that for a long time, the Mendoza line has been drawn at .200.

TornLabrum
05-20-2005, 05:47 PM
There are three stories that ciruclate about the origin of the Mendoza line. The first is that it refers to Minnie Mendoza, but that seems to be the least likely origin.

The second, which is fairly widely accepted is Brett's quote that, "Every Sunday I look in the paper and see if I'm above the Mendoza line" (or words to that effect).

The third is that it came when Mendoza, Paciorek and Bruce Bochte were teammates on the Mariners. Paciorek and Bochte are generally given co-credit, although I think Paciorek has tried to pawn it all off on Bochte.