PDA

View Full Version : Buster Olney??


SOXit2EM
05-08-2005, 07:49 PM
I see there is a new article on espn.com that features the Sox pitching staff. It says " With this staff's stuff the White sox can do no wrong". It's an insider article, has anyone with insider checked it out? And if so can you post it here??? :cool:

SoxFan48
05-08-2005, 08:20 PM
Nod, Throw and Repeat

Mark Buehrle never shakes off the sign, Jon Garland has noticed. "Maybe once or twice a year," Garland says. Buehrle gets the ball back, takes his perch on the rubber, looks for the sign, nods and executes the pitch. Then he gets the ball back and nods and makes another pitch.



Buehrle trusts the catcher, Garland has noticed. Let the catcher pick the pitch; Buehrle focuses entirely on executing the pitch. Now Garland is doing the same thing, taking the sign and nodding like a bobblehead, throwing and getting the ball back and taking the rubber and commanding the rhythm and pace and making the hitter feel like he can't come up for air.

Garland is 6-0 now, after beating the Toronto Blue Jays on Saturday (http://www.dailyherald.com/sports/sportsstory.asp?id=46220), and the funny thing is, White Sox pitching coach Don Cooper will tell you that none of the elements of his stuff has changed. He's always had a good sinker, the breaking ball and the changeup. He's not like the '03 Esteban Loaiza, a journeyman who suddenly had an unhittable cut fastball. All of the ingredients have been there. It's just that now he's dictating the pace, and not allowing a couple of hits turn into the kind of big inning that often wrecked him last year.

"He's going to go after hitters," Cooper says. "It's a matter of maturity, and trusting himself, and being aggressive. He's still relatively young, but he's a veteran in the major leagues."

Garland broke into the White Sox rotation at age 20, had his first season of double-digit victories at 22, had his 100th big-league start at 24; he's just 25 now, and understanding more about what he already knew. "I'm throwing a lot of strikes early in the count, and making a lot more quality pitches," he says, in a telephone interview a couple of days ago. "It seemed like last year, somebody would get on base, and I would try to make the perfect pitch and get a ground ball."

In doing that, Garland might throw a ball out of the strike zone, put himself at a disadvantage. This year, he's been attacking the strike zone. Opponents have had 81 at-bats after the count was 0 balls and 1 strike, and managed 16 hits, for a .198 average -- with only 2 walks and 17 strikeouts. And when the count starts 1-0, opponents are hitting .210, with 5 walks and 2 strikeouts, with Garland keeping after them relentlessly, taking the sign and nodding and throwing.

He might have shaken off a sign once or twice while shutting out the Detroit Tigers on May 1, he estimates; he had gotten ahead in the count and preferred to waste a pitch. But besides that, he let catcher Chris Widger do the heavy mental lifting. Garland just nodded and threw and got the ball back and nodded and threw again. Buehrle has "definitely been an influence," Garland says. "I've got great catchers" -- A.J. Pierzynski and Widger -- "guys who are intelligent catchers. They get a plan and they stick to it." And Jon Garland keeps nodding, keeps winning.

SOXit2EM
05-08-2005, 08:23 PM
Nod, Throw and Repeat

Mark Buehrle never shakes off the sign, Jon Garland has noticed. "Maybe once or twice a year," Garland says. Buehrle gets the ball back, takes his perch on the rubber, looks for the sign, nods and executes the pitch. Then he gets the ball back and nods and makes another pitch.



Buehrle trusts the catcher, Garland has noticed. Let the catcher pick the pitch; Buehrle focuses entirely on executing the pitch. Now Garland is doing the same thing, taking the sign and nodding like a bobblehead, throwing and getting the ball back and taking the rubber and commanding the rhythm and pace and making the hitter feel like he can't come up for air.

Garland is 6-0 now, after beating the Toronto Blue Jays on Saturday (http://www.dailyherald.com/sports/sportsstory.asp?id=46220), and the funny thing is, White Sox pitching coach Don Cooper will tell you that none of the elements of his stuff has changed. He's always had a good sinker, the breaking ball and the changeup. He's not like the '03 Esteban Loaiza, a journeyman who suddenly had an unhittable cut fastball. All of the ingredients have been there. It's just that now he's dictating the pace, and not allowing a couple of hits turn into the kind of big inning that often wrecked him last year.

"He's going to go after hitters," Cooper says. "It's a matter of maturity, and trusting himself, and being aggressive. He's still relatively young, but he's a veteran in the major leagues."

Garland broke into the White Sox rotation at age 20, had his first season of double-digit victories at 22, had his 100th big-league start at 24; he's just 25 now, and understanding more about what he already knew. "I'm throwing a lot of strikes early in the count, and making a lot more quality pitches," he says, in a telephone interview a couple of days ago. "It seemed like last year, somebody would get on base, and I would try to make the perfect pitch and get a ground ball."

In doing that, Garland might throw a ball out of the strike zone, put himself at a disadvantage. This year, he's been attacking the strike zone. Opponents have had 81 at-bats after the count was 0 balls and 1 strike, and managed 16 hits, for a .198 average -- with only 2 walks and 17 strikeouts. And when the count starts 1-0, opponents are hitting .210, with 5 walks and 2 strikeouts, with Garland keeping after them relentlessly, taking the sign and nodding and throwing.

He might have shaken off a sign once or twice while shutting out the Detroit Tigers on May 1, he estimates; he had gotten ahead in the count and preferred to waste a pitch. But besides that, he let catcher Chris Widger do the heavy mental lifting. Garland just nodded and threw and got the ball back and nodded and threw again. Buehrle has "definitely been an influence," Garland says. "I've got great catchers" -- A.J. Pierzynski and Widger -- "guys who are intelligent catchers. They get a plan and they stick to it." And Jon Garland keeps nodding, keeps winning. BEAUTIFUL!! THANKS!!!!! :cool: