PDA

View Full Version : Know your Pale Hose history


TommyJohn
04-22-2005, 02:58 PM
Today and tomorrow are anniversaries of two of the most interesting and
unusual games in White Sox history. They both took place in the same
stadium against the same team.

On April 22, 1959 the White Sox played one of the most bizarre innings
in baseball history at Kansas City vs. the A's. In the top of the 7th
inning, they scored eleven runs on one hit en route to a 20-6 victory.
The hit was a single by Johnny Callison, which was misplayed by right
fielder Roger Maris. There were eight (I think eight) walks, several of
them with the bases loaded. Many were given up by Tom Gorman, who
the next year would become an umpire, perhaps as part of a never-ending
quest to find home plate. As bad as it was for KC, it could have been worse.
Two of the outs were recorded by Jim Landis, one by Bob Shaw, the pitcher.

Four years earlier, April 23, 1955, the White Sox had pounded the A's in
KC 29-6. They hit seven home runs in that game. The next day they
got shut out on five hits. Bob Vandeberg writes of that game in today's
Trib:
www.chicagotribune.com/sports (http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports)

EDIT: Sorry, first link returned an error. Click this one and click on "Sox ride
wind to place in history."

Paulwny
04-22-2005, 03:04 PM
Today and tomorrow are anniversaries of two of the most interesting and
unusual games in White Sox history. They both took place in the same
stadium against the same team.

On April 22, 1959 the White Sox played one of the most bizarre innings
in baseball history at Kansas City vs. the A's. In the top of the 7th
inning, they scored eleven runs on one hit en route to a 20-6 victory.
The hit was a single by Johnny Callison, which was misplayed by right
fielder Roger Maris. There were eight (I think eight) walks, several of
them with the bases loaded. Many were given up by Tom Gorman, who
the next year would become an umpire, perhaps as part of a never-ending
quest to find home plate. As bad as it was for KC, it could have been worse.
Two of the outs were recorded by Jim Landis, one by Bob Shaw, the pitcher.

Four years earlier, April 23, 1955, the White Sox had pounded the A's in
KC 29-6. They hit seven home runs in that game. The next day they
got shut out on five hits. Bob Vandeberg writes of that game in today's
Trib:
www.chicagotribune.com/sports (http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports)

EDIT: Sorry, first link returned an error. Click this one and click on "Sox ride
wind to place in history."

My scoring book was a mess after that inning in 59, but it was a pleasure to listen to.

wdelaney72
04-22-2005, 03:18 PM
Tom Gorman, who the next year would become an umpire, perhaps as part of a never-ending quest to find home plate.

:rolling: Too funny. Does that mean, if the outfield doesn't work for Rick Ankiel, he could consider being an umpire?

I want Mags back
04-22-2005, 04:56 PM
Also, April 22 in 2000, I think, was when he had those 2 fights vs. the Tigers. That was the best, not because of the fights, because we beat Detroit so badly that they kept starting fights

Lip Man 1
04-22-2005, 10:43 PM
Here's the 1959 inning breakdown:

Gorman came in to pitch for the A's. Boone was safe when DeMaestri fielded his grounder but threw wide of first. Smith sacrificed Boone to second but was safe when catcher Hal Smith fumbled the ball. Callison singled to right, Boone scored, and when Maris fumbled the ball, Smith scored while Callison took third. Aparicio walked and stole second. Shaw walked to fill the bases. Freeman came in to pitch for the A's. Torgeson walked forcing in Callison. Fox walked forcing in Aparicio. Landis bounced one back to Freeman who threw to the plate forcing Shaw. Lollar walked forcing Torgeson home. George Brunet (later made famous in Ball Four by Jim Bouton as the guy who didn't wear underwear) came in to pitch for K.C. Boone walked forcing Fox in. Smith walked, forcing Landis in. Callison was hit by a pitch forcing Lollar in. Skisas ran for Callison. Aparicio struck out. Phillips pinch hit for Toregson and walked forcing in Smith. Fox walked forcing in Skisas. Landis grounded out to Brunet.

11 runs, 1 hit, 3 errors.

Lip

itsnotrequired
04-22-2005, 10:44 PM
Here's the 1959 inning breakdown:

Gorman came in to pitch for the A's. Boone was safe when DeMaestri fielded his grounder but threw wide of first. Smith sacrificed Boone to second but was safe when catcher Hal Smith fumbled the ball. Callison singled to right, Boone scored, and when Maris fumbled the ball, Smith scored while Callison took third. Aparicio walked and stole second. Shaw walked to fill the bases. Freeman came in to pitch for the A's. Torgeson walked forcing in Callison. Fox walked forcing in Aparicio. Landis bounced one back to Freeman who threw to the plate forcing Shaw. Lollar walked forcing Torgeson home. George Brunet (later made famous in Ball Four by Jim Bouton as the guy who didn't wear underwear) came in to pitch for K.C. Boone walked forcing Fox in. Smith walked, forcing Landis in. Callison was hit by a pitch forcing Lollar in. Skisas ran for Callison. Aparicio struck out. Phillips pinch hit for Toregson and walked forcing in Smith. Fox walked forcing in Skisas. Landis grounded out to Brunet.

11 runs, 1 hit, 3 errors.

Lip

So what's the problem with your scorecard? Seems like an easy inning.

Mark
05-01-2005, 01:51 PM
Not a bad day at the office...

5/1/59 At the age of 39, White Sox hurler Early Wynn pitches a one-hitter striking out 14 and hits a double and home run to beat the Red Sox, 1-0.