PDA

View Full Version : Is New York the best baseball town?


Fenway
04-01-2005, 06:01 PM
As much as I hate New York City I must concede that it is a baseball mad town. I don't know if today compares to post WWII era but with the media hype it maybe more intense. Boston is obviously baseball crazy and I have heard St Louis maybe the best baseball town of all.

Chicago is on the high end as well but baseball does slip off the radar during the winter
April 1, 2005

The Sport That Never Sleeps

By LEE JENKINS (http://query.nytimes.com/search/query?ppds=bylL&v1=LEE JENKINS&fdq=19960101&td=sysdate&sort=newest&ac=LEE JENKINS&inline=nyt-per)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/dropcap/n.gifinety-year-old Buzzie Bavasi is going on again about a time when there were three baseball teams in New York and 10 news media outlets on their tail, when football was an afterthought and basketball was a sideshow, when a color barrier was being broken and a Hall of Fame wing was being formed, all in the same outsized city.

He is not talking about Ebbets Field, The New York Herald Tribune or Jackie Robinson. He is talking about today.

Starting this season, Randy Johnson, Pedro Martínez and Carlos Beltran join New York's crowded marquee. Willie Randolph becomes the first African-American manager of a major league franchise in New York. And the city once again follows three baseball teams: the Yankees, the Mets and the Boston Red Sox. They will be chronicled with front-page fervor that no longer applies to the Giants or the Jets, the Knicks or the Nets.

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/04/01/sports/baseball/01newyork.html

Nellie_Fox
04-01-2005, 07:21 PM
I can't really comment on how New York is as a baseball town, but the excerpt is just another example of why so much of the rest of the country hates New York. It's that "if it didn't happen in New York, it didn't happen" attitude that would cause them to consider Willie Randolph becoming Mets manager as "breaking the color barrier." There have been so many black managers in baseball that it's not even news any more, but to them it only matters when it happens in New York.

Rocklive99
04-01-2005, 07:56 PM
There's interest and such, but they remind me more of Cub fans. I was born in NY and visit frequently, and I know plenty of people who watch games religiously, some even with the Extra Innings Package, but then when you try to talk baseball with them or anything, you realize it's just bandwagon type stuff and that they're fortunate to have good teams/an owner that spends, but they really don't know the game at all. Of course all teams have both dumb and smart fans (baseball wise), the majority I talked to in NY were like this (the Mets fans weren't as bad). I don't know, that's just how it appears to me from an outside perspective, so it is a good baseball town as far as fan base, ticketing, ratings, etc, but not in terms of knowing the game.

balke
04-01-2005, 08:27 PM
I'd like to see the Yanks and Mets be bad for about 7-8 years, and see how good of a baseball town it is.

RKMeibalane
04-01-2005, 10:24 PM
No, it's not.

Cities such as St. Louis, Chicago, Baltimore, etc. rate as better baseball towns, IMO. The moment the Yankees go into the tank (after Steinbrenner sells), their fans will disappear. Being from southern Indiana, I was a Don Mattingly fan growing up. The Yankees were not a good team for most of his career, and believe me, they did not draw well at all. New York finished last in 1990, arguably the worst season in the history of the franchise. Things got so bad that most of their late-season games weren't even televised.

MRKARNO
04-01-2005, 10:31 PM
No, it's St. Louis, but New York is certainly in the upper tier of baseball cities.

The Racehorse
04-01-2005, 11:07 PM
**in Paste Picante sauce vernacular** ... New York City?

I thought the best baseball town was St. Petersburg Florida!

dcb33
04-01-2005, 11:30 PM
If New York is such a great baseball town, then how come it lost two of the most historic franchises in baseball history?

MRKARNO
04-01-2005, 11:55 PM
If New York is such a great baseball town, then how come it lost two of the most historic franchises in baseball history?

The answer to half of this question is contained in this pretty good book (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0385501528/qid=1112417658/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/002-3397536-7856034) about the Dodgers that I read this winter. It's worth a read if you have a chance.

doublem23
04-02-2005, 01:05 AM
I'm not going to lie... Chicago is a pretty bad baseball town. The best I've ever been to is St. Louis. As insane as the local residents are, they do know their baseball.

StillMissOzzie
04-02-2005, 01:43 AM
**in Paste Picante sauce vernacular** ... New York City?

I thought the best baseball town was St. Petersburg Florida!

Excuse me, but that's Pace picante sauce, not "Paste".

I would also vote for St. Louis before NY or Chicago. Think of how the redbird fans turn out on a per capita basis for the size of that market, and how they are rewarded for that support in kind.

SMO
:gulp:

The Racehorse
04-02-2005, 07:25 AM
Excuse me, but that's Pace picante sauce, not "Paste".


oops :redface:

TheBull19
04-02-2005, 08:01 AM
According to a study from last year in which people in cities w/ major sports teams were asked to rate their favorite professional team sport, only in 3 did baseball rank as the preferred sport: NY, Seattle and Phoenix

DumpJerry
04-02-2005, 07:01 PM
How can New York be a good baseball town? They don't have the White Sox!

If we got rid of the Flubs, Chicago would be real high on the list becasue the bandwagoners who call themselves "die hard" Cub fans would support us so long as we maintain the consistency of the last 5 seasons (winning records, but not making it to the post season).

Oh well, I think Comiskey is a better place without those "fans." They would sit there referring to our players by their first names like they are personally known to them and have no clue whatsoever who plays what position.

MeanFish
04-02-2005, 10:29 PM
How can New York be a good baseball town? They don't have the White Sox!

If we got rid of the Flubs, Chicago would be real high on the list becasue the bandwagoners who call themselves "die hard" Cub fans would support us so long as we maintain the consistency of the last 5 seasons (winning records, but not making it to the post season).

Oh well, I think Comiskey is a better place without those "fans." They would sit there referring to our players by their first names like they are personally known to them and have no clue whatsoever who plays what position.

Ozzie? Paulie? Timo? Shingo? Freddy? Nope, Sox fans never use first names. Ever.

Though you're right; at least we know what positions they play.

DumpJerry
04-02-2005, 11:20 PM
Ozzie? Paulie? Timo? Shingo? Freddy? Nope, Sox fans never use first names. Ever.

Though you're right; at least we know what positions they play.

When we use the first names, we use it with reverence. Flub fans don't have the right amount of respect when they use thier team's first names.....but then, how much respect do people like "Sammy" deserve?

AZChiSoxFan
04-05-2005, 12:53 PM
No, it's St. Louis, but New York is certainly in the upper tier of baseball cities.

I always have to laugh when I hear how St. Louis is such a great baseball town. In 1999 my wife and I went to STL for July 4th weekend to attend the D-Backs/Cards series. For the Monday game, the pitching matchup was Randy Johnson vs. Jose Jimenez. The lady sitting next to us (self proclaimed "Huge baseball fan") goes on and on telling us how great Jose Jimenez is, then proceeds to ask us "So who is this guy pitching for Arizona? Is he any good?"

I was also amazed at all the smack I heard from STL fans, especially given the fact that at the time, they had a losing record and the D-backs were 3 games out of first place. I'm not the kind to trash talk and was just trying to watch the games. I realize they've won the World Series 9 times so to an extent I can understand their arrogance. After all the great things I had heard about STL fans, I was very disappointed.

chaz171
04-05-2005, 12:56 PM
I'd really like to share my true feelings about New York, but I don't feel like getting banned again!!!!!!!!

MeanFish
04-05-2005, 01:04 PM
I'd really like to share my true feelings about New York, but I don't feel like getting banned again!!!!!!!!

Again? :?:

MisterB
04-05-2005, 02:26 PM
I'd like to see the Yanks and Mets be bad for about 7-8 years, and see how good of a baseball town it is.

The nadir in that respect was 1992. The Yanks & Mets combined for a 148-176 record and collectively were outdrawn by Toronto and Baltimore.

DumpJerry
04-05-2005, 02:39 PM
When I saw the Spankmee fans give Giambi a standing ovation when he came up the first time on Sunday night, they became the lowest creatures on planet Earth.:angry:

I think he will get a "special" ovation when he comes here which involved only one finger on the hand. He should get that ovation at all ballparks he slithers into for a game until he retires.

Fake Chet Lemon
04-05-2005, 11:16 PM
The immediate Chicago metro area is about 7,000,000 and MLB sold about 5,000,000 tickets last year. I don't think New York comes close to that ratio. Considering we draw like that and we HAVEN'T WON JACK in about a century, if we aren't #1 we are in the running.

Fake Chet Lemon
04-05-2005, 11:18 PM
When I saw the Spankmee fans give Giambi a standing ovation when he came up the first time on Sunday night, they became the lowest creatures on planet Earth.:angry:

I think he will get a "special" ovation when he comes here which involved only one finger on the hand. He should get that ovation at all ballparks he slithers into for a game until he retires.

A few banners at the Cell demanded he give back Frank the MVP he EARNED when they visit would also be a nice touch.

Jurr
04-08-2005, 04:40 PM
When you start reading about the Giants, Dodgers (or Trolley-dodgers as they were once called), and Yankees, you start to see that the city once had an EXTREMELY rich baseball heritage.

We're definitely not talking about today's climate, but as far as baseball heritage goes, there wasn't a better city to watch great baseball for many decades than NYC. There were three teams, each of 'em hated the other, and each borough of the city rooted heartily for their squad. I would've loved to visit NYC back then and just spent a month taking in that scene.