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Fenway
03-24-2005, 01:05 PM
A company in Virgina has some old White Sox games on cassette or CD and some may be of interest to you

http://www.baseballdirect.com/broadcasts2.html#1960

they include

1959
Oct. 1 http://www.baseballdirect.com/images/new2.gif

Chicago (AL) 11, Los Angeles 0. Kluszewski's two homers pace the White Sox in Game 1 of the Series. (Saam, Allen)




1959
Oct. 6http://www.baseballdirect.com/images/new2.gif

Chicago (AL) 1, Los Angeles 0. Three White Sox hurlers beat Koufax before a record crowd of 90,706 in Game 5 of the Series. (Saam, Allen)



1960
May 20

Chicago (AL) 5, New York (AL)3. Early Wynn beats Whitey Ford in a game featuring the debut of Bill Veeck's exploding scoreboard. Mickey Mantle homers for the Yanks. (Allen, Rizzuto)

Lip Man 1
03-24-2005, 01:13 PM
I believe this is through MLB you can find the same games for purchase on their web site in addition to a company called Baseball Direct (in Virginia). I get their catelogues.

The MLB site actually has more Sox games listed.

Lip

wilburaga
03-24-2005, 03:53 PM
If some Sox historian could shed some light on the debut of the exploding scoreboard I would greatly appreciate it. Various accounts have the scoreboard first going off on April 19, 1960 pursuant to a Minnie Minoso home run. Some accounts even add the detail that the scoreboard malfunctioned on Minnie's first homer, but lit up successfully on his second homer that day.

However, other accounts, including the Sox Media Guide, cite May 1, 1960, as the date of the initial eruption, following an Al Smith homer.

Not being from Chicago, I prevailed upon a friend to visit the Harold Washington Library, scour the Chicago Tribune's archives for that period and set the record straight. His findings surprised me. There is no mention of the scoreboard exploding in the game coverage of the April 19th game. However, a check of the game coverage for the May 1st game reveals a picture of Al Smith's HR with the headline, "Veeck's Monster Finally Gets To Sound Off", underscored with the caption, "Al Kaline of Detroit watches as Al Smith's home run sails into Comiskey Park's bullpen in the third inning of the 1st game on Sunday. The hit signaled the first output from Bill Veeck's $300,000 Rube Goldberg scoreboard, including explosion of ten aerial bombs".

So I'm convinced the Media Guide was right and the other accounts were incorrect. If anyone can fill in some details about this episode in Sox history it would be much appreciated.


W

owensmouth
03-24-2005, 05:31 PM
As I remember, it was about the third or fourth home game before it was set off. The Sox just didn't hit any home runs in the first couple of games.

Lip Man 1
03-24-2005, 07:36 PM
I'll check on this for you and see what can be found.

I do know that on opening day 1960 Minnie hit two home runs in a 10-9 win over the A's. I don't know if the scorboard went off or not though. The Sox opened the season with two home games before hitting the road then returning home on April 28th.

Lip

Wsoxmike59
03-25-2005, 07:09 AM
http://www.mlb.com/NASApp/mlb/mlb/shop/mlb_shop_bb_cassettes.jsp


Here's a list of old games on audio for sale at MLB.com I also remember there was a company that used to sell these games on audio cassette and advertised in the back of Baseball Digest in the 70's and 80's.

tebman
03-25-2005, 09:27 AM
If some Sox historian could shed some light on the debut of the exploding scoreboard I would greatly appreciate it. Various accounts have the scoreboard first going off on April 19, 1960 pursuant to a Minnie Minoso home run. Some accounts even add the detail that the scoreboard malfunctioned on Minnie's first homer, but lit up successfully on his second homer that day.

However, other accounts, including the Sox Media Guide, cite May 1, 1960, as the date of the initial eruption, following an Al Smith homer.

Not being from Chicago, I prevailed upon a friend to visit the Harold Washington Library, scour the Chicago Tribune's archives for that period and set the record straight. His findings surprised me. There is no mention of the scoreboard exploding in the game coverage of the April 19th game. However, a check of the game coverage for the May 1st game reveals a picture of Al Smith's HR with the headline, "Veeck's Monster Finally Gets To Sound Off", underscored with the caption, "Al Kaline of Detroit watches as Al Smith's home run sails into Comiskey Park's bullpen in the third inning of the 1st game on Sunday. The hit signaled the first output from Bill Veeck's $300,000 Rube Goldberg scoreboard, including explosion of ten aerial bombs".

So I'm convinced the Media Guide was right and the other accounts were incorrect. If anyone can fill in some details about this episode in Sox history it would be much appreciated.


W
Nice work, wilburaga! I've never been able to pin down the actual game and batter that first set it off, and I've always wondered about that. It's true that the Sox didn't hit many homers in those days and so the board's eruption really was an event. All the more so because it was so in-your-face as compared to anything else at the time.

For reference, go to http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/rwas/index.php?category=14&id=2241 and scroll down to the July 5, 1964 game. Listen to Mike Hershberger's home run and the cacophony of noise from the board. :wired: :nuts: :bandance:

DannyCaterFan
03-25-2005, 10:11 AM
That April 19th, 1960 game just happened to be my first ever White Sox game that I attended. It was opening day and I was seated with my Dad in the left field stands. I was only 8 at the time and I can rewmember the Sox beat KC by a 10-9 score, with Minnie Minoso hitting two home runs. While reading the accounts of some of the other posters in this thread, there is some dispute as to whether the scoreboard was set off that day? Forty-five years have passed by, but I have always told friends that I remember being shocked by the sounds of mortar bombs exploding after the home runs that day. The fans sitting around us were not use to that kind of celebration and were startled by the sound of the board. I may be wrong, but I always thought they were set off that day.