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View Full Version : Chicago Tonight w/ Phil Ponce @ The Art Institute


Brian26
02-17-2005, 10:03 PM
Anyone catch Chicago Tonight?

Phil Ponce did a piece on a baseball stadium exhibit currently at the Art Institute. It looked really interesting, too. Unfortunately I didn't catch the name of the artists/exhibitors. The exhibit has to do with baseball stadiums in urban areas and how they can fit in a cityscape from a density standpoint. Unfortunately, the exhibit had bad things to say about the area around the Cell, and Ponce showed his true baby blue colors in reporting it. Still, it looked like an interesting piece. They had some models of the Cell with townhomes and buildings surrounding it in the parking lot areas.

I'll try to find a link.

Brian26
02-17-2005, 10:12 PM
http://www.artic.edu/aic/exhibitions/10visions/ten_visions.html

Brian26
02-17-2005, 10:12 PM
Interesting stuff from the site:

Architect’s statement (excerpt)
“Baseball in the City” is the result of studying, on an urban scale, how environments surrounding baseball parks might adapt and change to accommodate other events. With the help of architecture students at the Illinois Institute of Technology, we conducted research for three years on the physical differences between Chicago’s two baseball parks and their connected neighborhoods. While Wrigleyville, home of the Chicago Cubs, has the ability to adapt and maintain high, diverse density—game or no game—the section of the city surrounding U.S. Cellular Field, home of the Chicago White Sox, is monofunctional with only two conditions: empty or full. Our exhibit includes four proposals for reintegrating U.S. Cellular Field into the life of the city in the form of architectural scale models.

TornLabrum
02-17-2005, 11:01 PM
Interesting stuff from the site:

Architect’s statement (excerpt)
“Baseball in the City” is the result of studying, on an urban scale, how environments surrounding baseball parks might adapt and change to accommodate other events. With the help of architecture students at the Illinois Institute of Technology, we conducted research for three years on the physical differences between Chicago’s two baseball parks and their connected neighborhoods. While Wrigleyville, home of the Chicago Cubs, has the ability to adapt and maintain high, diverse density—game or no game—the section of the city surrounding U.S. Cellular Field, home of the Chicago White Sox, is monofunctional with only two conditions: empty or full. Our exhibit includes four proposals for reintegrating U.S. Cellular Field into the life of the city in the form of architectural scale models.

The first of which is getting rid of all those unsightly parking lots that make entry and egress easy and relatively inexpensive for the people who actually use tha ball park.

TDog
02-17-2005, 11:24 PM
One of the things I love about the new park is the fact that it is that there is parking around it.

That wasn't meant to be in teal.

elrod
02-17-2005, 11:25 PM
Jeanne Gang is pretty hot, though. She kinda reminds me of Neko Case.

:cool:

hold2dibber
02-18-2005, 08:27 AM
Interesting stuff from the site:

the section of the city surrounding U.S. Cellular Field, home of the Chicago White Sox, is monofunctional with only two conditions: empty or full. Our exhibit includes four proposals for reintegrating U.S. Cellular Field into the life of the city in the form of architectural scale models.

I'm shocked it doesn't say "U.S. Cellular Field is monofunctional with only two conditions: empty or half-empty" since most people other than Sox fans think only about 7 people show up at the games.

DSpivack
02-18-2005, 02:10 PM
Jeanne Gang is pretty hot, though. She kinda reminds me of Neko Case.

:cool:

Neko is hit and miss for me, looks-wise. Then again, I've never seen her live, and am tomorrow night! Can't wait!

Also, the Art Institute's website won't open for some reason.

MushMouth
02-18-2005, 02:32 PM
Anyone catch Chicago Tonight?

Phil Ponce did a piece on a baseball stadium exhibit currently at the Art Institute. .


I checked out the exhibit last month - pretty good stuff on US Cell. Different possibilities and "solutions" for all kinds of housing/city/urban problems. Most interesting to me was the collage that had the crime stats for Wrigley Field vs. US Cellular where Wrigley was FAR more dangerous. Basically it was challenging the idea that Comiskey is dangerous and Wrigley is somehow "safer". I thought people here would like that!

Good stuff - everyone should check it out if you're into architecture, city development.

jackbrohamer
02-18-2005, 02:45 PM
Interesting stuff from the site:

Architect’s statement (excerpt) While Wrigleyville, home of the Chicago Cubs, has the ability to adapt and maintain high, diverse density...

*** is "diverse" about the people in "Wrigleyville"? Most of the people in the neighborhood at a given momemt are Caucasians, 22-35 years old, middle- to upper-middle-class. That's diverse?

SaltyPretzel
02-18-2005, 05:20 PM
Does anyone know how long the exibit will be?

maurice
02-18-2005, 05:22 PM
I assume y'all are talking about this (http://www.artic.edu/aic/exhibitions/10visions/ten_visions.html#), which provides an end date of 4/3/05.

Some pics:
http://lynnbecker.com/repeat/tenvisions/cardwall.jpghttp://lynnbecker.com/repeat/tenvisions/detailcap.jpg

http://lynnbecker.com/repeat/tenvisions/spacecap.jpg

WikdChiSoxFan
02-18-2005, 05:42 PM
Gang teaches architecture at IIT. (The school on the other side of the Dan Ryan.) I am also a student of architecture at IIT, so I apologize of my brief defense of Jeanne Gang.

First, to address the comment about "diverse density." This is completely different than "diversity" What she means is that people live and work and drink in and around the park. Well, mostly drink and puke. The Cell and the area around the Cell are only active during games. The lots are rather desolate and lonely when there isn't a game on. This isn't a knock on the surrounding Bridgeport and Bronzeville communities. These diverse living, breathing, development-free communities are becoming very well regarded by a lot of architects today. I've moved to Bridgeport and I love it.

Secondly, the lots do take a toll on the surrounding community in a lot of negative fashions. It takes a large chunk out of what could be the most lively and productive area of Bridgeport, that which lies near the Red Line. I think it's safe to say that the parking lots were the cheapest option.

Her comments are more on urban planning than on the architecture of the park. I think Gang probably isn't impressed with the Cell's architecture, but I'm pretty sure she would say some nasty things about the architecture of Wrigley. Many architects, (unless brainwashed by the Trib), would agree that Wrigley field is almost unbearably ugly, and is a historic ruin that gets a lot of attention. Certain old buildings are known for their beauty. Others for their reputation.

I think the area around the Cell could be improved a great deal. It's a great location for any and everything. (But I promise you, I would not want 80 bars there and a bunch of drunken fools making our team look like idiots.)

maurice
02-18-2005, 05:49 PM
I think it's safe to say that the parking lots were the cheapest option.

And also the option preferred by the chairman himself. JR erroneously believed that leveling the area around the park would help the Sox by eliminating local competition for fans' dollars. He also wanted to make the park attractive to suburban fans who presumably would drive in from the burbs with kids in tow, thus presumably having little need for pre- or post-game "festivities" outside of the park itself. Oopsie!

I've long advocated that the State, etc. rectify this miscalculation by coordinating the construction of mixed-use buildings along 35th St. and Wentworth. This sort of thing would eventually merge seamlessly with other developments which are making their way down those arteries. Some of the other proposals seem silly to me, but I'll try to give them a closer look before the exhibit closes.