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NonetheLoaiza
02-01-2005, 10:10 AM
I was just doing some work here, and heard the sirens being tested outside, and was wondering how great that sound would be to hear in late October as the Sox clinched the AL Pennant. I also was wondering if anyone specifically remembered when Mayor Daley had the sirens go off. Anyone have any stories about it that they would like to share?

Just a curious Sox fan looking to fill a baseball void until ST...

soxrme
02-01-2005, 10:16 AM
I was just doing some work here, and heard the sirens being tested outside, and was wondering how great that sound would be to hear in late October as the Sox clinched the AL Pennant. I also was wondering if anyone specifically remembered when Mayor Daley had the sirens go off. Anyone have any stories about it that they would like to share?

Just a curious Sox fan looking to fill a baseball void until ST...
There was a lot of cold war tension at the time and it scared a lot of people who were not baseball fans. My dad and I knew what it was but a lot of people from our neighborhood ran outside and were worried. It almost gave my grandmother who was in Europe during WW2 a heart attack. I thought it was great (not the heart attack part). It was probably on of my greatest times I ever had with my dad.

duke of dorwood
02-01-2005, 10:35 AM
There was a fire station 4 blocks from me, and the sound was being blown my way by a gentle south wind-all the windows were open-my grandpa who lived downstairs figured out what was going on-it was a joyous night for a 10 year old Nellie Fox fan. The sirens didnt last long.

Nellie_Fox
02-01-2005, 10:38 AM
I should probably research this before I post, but I'm at work and don't have access to my library, but I think it was Fire Commissioner Quinn who ordered the sirens set off, not Mayor Daley.

Lip Man 1
02-01-2005, 10:40 AM
Nellie according to the Sun-Times from the next day (I have the actual newspaper) Quinn did set them off but Daley approved it.

Lip

DC Sox Fan
02-01-2005, 10:52 AM
you can find a link to audio files of these sirens here: http://www.victorysiren.com/x/index.htm

Tekijawa
02-01-2005, 11:07 AM
There was a lot of cold war tension at the time and it scared a lot of people who were not baseball fans. My dad and I knew what it was but a lot of people from our neighborhood ran outside and were worried.

It's amazing... back in DeKalb, when the Tornado Sirens went off people would run out side to see too! I would think that in the case of Massive bombings and Tornados the last place you would want to be is out in the middle of the street uncovered, funny how the humn mind works!

slavko
02-01-2005, 11:10 AM
Part of the problem was that the sirens didn't go off when the game ended, but almost 2 hours later so the connection wasn't apparent. It scared the bleep out of a lot of people.

Nellie_Fox
02-01-2005, 11:31 AM
It's amazing... back in DeKalb, when the Tornado Sirens went off people would run out side to see too! I would think that in the case of Massive bombings and Tornados the last place you would want to be is out in the middle of the street uncovered, funny how the humn mind works!I can tell you from 25 years of experience in police work that we absolutely hated having to set off the tornado sirens, because immediately the 911 system (and all the non-emergency phone numbers in the department, as well) would be overwhelmed with calls from people asking (1) if the alert was real and (2) what should they do. Every phone line we had would be tied up continuously for 15 to 20 minutes afterward.

PaleHoseGeorge
02-01-2005, 11:38 AM
I should probably research this before I post, but I'm at work and don't have access to my library, but I think it was Fire Commissioner Quinn who ordered the sirens set off, not Mayor Daley.

As I understand it, the Chicago City Council passed an official decree in anticipation of the Sox clinching the '59 pennant that called for (paraphrasing here) "whistles to blow, sirens to blare, and general merriment." Come to think of it, it sounds a bit like Congress's decree regarding the celebration of July 4 as Independence Day. Hizzoner I'm sure wouldn't miss a similar opportunity to celebrate on behalf of his Sox.
:cool:

:hizzoner
"If Cubs fans don't like it there is always a mistletoe hanging from my coattails."

So to answer your question, Fire Commissioner Quinn was merely "following orders" to turn on the air raid sirens. Only in Chicago could such parochial interest and complete incompetence merge to create such a ridiculous outcome.

:redface:

mweflen
02-01-2005, 12:17 PM
There was a lot of cold war tension at the time and it scared a lot of people who were not baseball fans. My dad and I knew what it was but a lot of people from our neighborhood ran outside and were worried. It almost gave my grandmother who was in Europe during WW2 a heart attack. I thought it was great (not the heart attack part). It was probably on of my greatest times I ever had with my dad.

People ran outside upon hearing an air-raid siren?! Talk about bad Civil Defense training! :smile:

chisoxmike
02-01-2005, 01:01 PM
My dad told me stories of when the Sox clinched the 59 pennent. He remembers the sirens going off and his household knew why becuase the Sox just won, but his uncle was running down the streets and ran into their home and started yelling "The Russians are bombing the russians are bombing!" They quickly told him what was really going on.

soxrme
02-01-2005, 03:01 PM
People ran outside upon hearing an air-raid siren?! Talk about bad Civil Defense training! :smile:

How about this for Civil Defense training: if you were in school, go under your desk, I guess to kiss the persons' ass in front of you goodbye.:bandance:

Ol' No. 2
02-01-2005, 03:03 PM
How about this for Civil Defense training: if you were in school, go under your desk, I guess to kiss the persons' ass in front of you goodbye.:bandance:No. They told you to put your head between your knees and kiss YOUR OWN ass goodbye. Too bad. I sat right behind Denise K.

NSSoxFan
02-01-2005, 03:07 PM
No. They told you to put your head between your knees and kiss YOUR OWN ass goodbye. Too bad. I sat right behind Denise K.

"Duck and cover". I love hearing that at USCF when a liner goes into the stands, it is from a government civil defense video from the Cold War period.

NonetheLoaiza
02-01-2005, 03:11 PM
"Duck and cover". I love hearing that at USCF when a liner goes into the stands, it is from a government civil defense video from the Cold War period.

We watched that video in one of my history classes back in high school. Really unbelievable how times change...

nebraskasox
02-01-2005, 05:30 PM
I hadn't started following baseball or the Sox closely yet. My earliest memories of any games are from 1960. When the sirens sounded in '59, I asked my Dad what was happening. He said nonchalantly, "Oh, the Sox just clinched the pennant." I (and I think he as a devoted Sox fan) accepted this as a perfectly valid reason why the air raid sirens were blasting throughout the city of Chicago.

Why wouldn't you blast the sirens throughout the city if the Sox had just clinched? It made perfect sense to us!

SOXPHILE
02-01-2005, 09:42 PM
It was 11 years before I was even born, but my dad, who was about 16 at the time, said that, yes, everybody was running out in the streets to see what was going on. Being a rabid Sox fan, he figured it out pretty quick what was happening, since he had been listening to the game in Cleveland on the radio. What made it disconcerning for alot of people though was that, in addition to being right in the middle of the Cold War with the Soviets, Nikita Kruschev was actually in the United States on a good will tour and to meet with President Eisenhower. When the sirens went off, alot of people thought "uh oh, something happened to Kruschev, and that's sparked World War III."