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I_Liked_Manuel
01-26-2005, 10:29 PM
any chance that thing (i think i'm being nice here) that they're building in left field screws with the wind and lowers the amount of homers thatll be hit?

chisox06
01-26-2005, 10:48 PM
This has been brought up a few times. Considering no one had any idea how the new roof would affect the Cell (making it a lanuching pad) I guess the best way to find out is to start playing some games, that sounds good, is it April yet?

BRDSR
01-26-2005, 10:51 PM
any chance that thing (i think i'm being nice here) that they're building in left field screws with the wind and lowers the amount of homers thatll be hit?

This subject came up a month or two ago and the general consensus was: we don't know, lets not speculate. Although, I don't really understand what the big deal would be anyway. If it lowers the number of home runs we hit, then it will lower the number of home runs hit for the other team as well. Over the course of 81 games, the averages will certainly even the numbers out.

tacosalbarojas
01-26-2005, 10:54 PM
This has been brought up a few times. Considering no one had any idea how the new roof would affect the Cell (making it a lanuching pad) I guess the best way to find out is to start playing some games, that sounds good, is it April yet? I'm not sure if this was mentioned during previous discussions of this issue, but on Labor Day last year Paulie came on the Score with Jesse Rogers and pooh-poohed the new roof as a reason for the HR explosion. He attributed it more to warmer weather during homestands in the first two months of the season. I myself didn't think it was all that much warmer on the early homestands, but maybe he was right.

GiveMeSox
01-26-2005, 11:18 PM
I'm not sure if this was mentioned during previous discussions of this issue, but on Labor Day last year Paulie came on the Score with Jesse Rogers and pooh-poohed the new roof as a reason for the HR explosion. He attributed it more to warmer weather during homestands in the first two months of the season. I myself didn't think it was all that much warmer on the early homestands, but maybe he was right.

Kw talked about this at soxfest and said they did do structural analysis to portray how wind current would change in the ballpark after the new roof. He said they didn't anticipate what happened last year, but they did anticipate a reduction in the previous swirling winds that were all so prevalent at the park before the new roof. You could see garbage swirling around the stadium and behind the plate with the wind. Now he said that doesn't happen so in essence what happened is the prevailing wind currents actually play out on the ball instead of the swirl from the old roof. With the roof being more open the wind blows on the field the same way it blows outside the field, no swirling action. The increase in homers is simply a function of the wind direction during summer months. Batters hit the ball from the west to the east at our park (slightly a little north to south as well). The prevailing wind patterns in the summer are westerly about 80% from weather statistics. Meaning 80% of the time the wind is inside the stadium blowing out, where as before the westerly winds or any winds would result in a swirl.

chisox06
01-26-2005, 11:24 PM
Kw talked about this at soxfest and said they did do structural analysis to portray how wind current would change in the ballpark after the new roof. He said they didn't anticipate what happened last year, but they did anticipate a reduction in the previous swirling winds that were all so prevalent at the park before the new roof. You could see garbage swirling around the stadium and behind the plate with the wind. Now he said that doesn't happen so in essence what happened is the prevailing wind currents actually play out on the ball instead of the swirl from the old roof. With the roof being more open the wind blows on the field the same way it blows outside the field, no swirling action. The increase in homers is simply a function of the wind direction during summer months. Batters hit the ball from the west to the east at our park (slightly a little north to south as well). The prevailing wind patterns in the summer are westerly about 80% from weather statistics. Meaning 80% of the time the wind is inside the stadium blowing out, where as before the westerly winds or any winds would result in a swirl.

A scientific explanation, and I can understand it, beautiful. That all makes a lot of sense, thanx!

NSSoxFan
01-26-2005, 11:25 PM
Kw talked about this at soxfest and said they did do structural analysis to portray how wind current would change in the ballpark after the new roof. He said they didn't anticipate what happened last year, but they did anticipate a reduction in the previous swirling winds that were all so prevalent at the park before the new roof. You could see garbage swirling around the stadium and behind the plate with the wind. Now he said that doesn't happen so in essence what happened is the prevailing wind currents actually play out on the ball instead of the swirl from the old roof. With the roof being more open the wind blows on the field the same way it blows outside the field, no swirling action. The increase in homers is simply a function of the wind direction during summer months. Batters hit the ball from the west to the east at our park (slightly a little north to south as well). The prevailing wind patterns in the summer are westerly about 80% from weather statistics. Meaning 80% of the time the wind is inside the stadium blowing out, where as before the westerly winds or any winds would result in a swirl.

Who put what in the what, now? I think your analysis makes sense.

pearso66
01-27-2005, 12:20 AM
even if the new roof was the cause of all the homers last year, I don't think that the Fundementals would effect it. It is below where a high fly ball might be effected by the wind. Therefore, it wouldnt cause any change in the wind at the peak of the flight, or where teh wind would effect the ball the most.

ewokpelts
01-27-2005, 08:56 AM
even if the new roof was the cause of all the homers last year, I don't think that the Fundementals would effect it. It is below where a high fly ball might be effected by the wind. Therefore, it wouldnt cause any change in the wind at the peak of the flight, or where teh wind would effect the ball the most.
plus, there will still be a "wall" of sorts back there...used to be an ad board, now the back wall to teh fundamentals deck....i think we're ok...
Gene

GiveMeSox
01-27-2005, 05:53 PM
A scientific explanation, and I can understand it, beautiful. That all makes a lot of sense, thanx!

Wow I cant beleive i put my civil engineering studies to good use here.