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View Full Version : 2005 Team Is Kenny's Team


infohawk
01-01-2005, 12:30 PM
More than any previous year, the 2005 season will truly be a reflection on Kenny William's ability as a General Manager. The 2005 season will represent the first time that Kenny has constructed a team almost entirely on players he has acquired during his tenure as GM. While he has made an assortment of moves over the past few years, those acquisitions or contract extensions were to augment an existing team rather than rebuild the team from top to bottom.

Consider the following: Five players, or fifty-five percent of the 2005 projected starting line-up, were acquired by Williams. Of those five players, four were acquired within the last year.

I am projecting four players for the bench. All four of Everett, Gload, Vazquez and Perez were acquired by Williams within the last year, give or take a few months for Gload. This of course is a one hundred percent change over two years ago.

Sixty percent of the starting rotation has not only been changed, but all three changes have taken place within the last 7-8 months.

One hundred percent of the bullpen has been constructed through trades or signings initiated by KW.

This is his team, and as Sox fans we will have a definitive opportunity to evaluate his abilities as the 2005 season unfolds.

veeter
01-01-2005, 12:42 PM
I like the post and it'll be something to consider as the year plays out.

eastchicagosoxfan
01-01-2005, 12:48 PM
KW wanted " grinders ". Has he acquired them? He's always struck me as a guy who will make a deal just to make one. Carl Everett comes to mind. You are correct, it's his team. I'm optimistic, but third place won't surprise me.

johnny_mostil
01-01-2005, 01:03 PM
KW wanted " grinders ". Has he acquired them? He's always struck me as a guy who will make a deal just to make one. Carl Everett comes to mind. You are correct, it's his team. I'm optimistic, but third place won't surprise me.Third place is likely if the team gets the same run of bad luck they got last year. But consider this: none of the other teams in the division has done anything resembling "improvement".

The Twins are making some strange-looking decisions and face a payroll crisis when Santana's contact gets settled. Twins fans are assuming they can win 90 games again, but Cy Young seasons rarely repeat, Cuddyer's not really a replacement for Koskie, Mauer more than likely can't really catch (or shouldn't be), and they probably have a Bad Contract in Joe Mays. They have a huge built-in advantage in playing in That Thing They Call The Metrodome, but what happens if Silva and Nathan revert to their established levels, Bartlett isn't ready, Mauer can't catch, Santana doesn't pitch like Sandy Koufax Jr, and Morneau falls back even a little? They have as many questions -- or more -- than the White Sox, and the prevailing attitude seems to be, "Oh, well, they always win lately, so they'll win again." Will they? Will every break fall their way four years in a row? You can easily create a scenario where the Twins actually post a losing season.

The Tigers made huge improvements last season, but what were they thinking with Percival? Is Inge really their third baseman? I-Rod usually gets hurt, what happens when he goes down? Teams that make great leaps forward usually fall back.

The Indians apparently made huge improvements, too, although they ended up far lower than their fifty-seven-odd All Star selections would indicate. But they are counting on Jake Westbrook's health and improvement, Arthur Rhodes in the pen, possibly Kevin Millstone -- I mean Millwood, and repeating what looks awfully like a career-fluke-level season from Hafner.

The Royals just stunk. They tested the limits of an adrenaline rush in 2003 and collapsed last year... but teams that make huge steps backward usually rebound... they'll be better but not good.

If the Central Division fan blogosphere is any indication of what's really thought about in baseball, I'd say the odds are the rest of the division is counting on the Same Old White Sox... depending almost completely on the starting pitching, they could be in for one nasty surprise.

fquaye149
01-01-2005, 02:13 PM
Third place is likely if the team gets the same run of bad luck they got last year. But consider this: none of the other teams in the division has done anything resembling "improvement".

The Twins are making some strange-looking decisions and face a payroll crisis when Santana's contact gets settled. Twins fans are assuming they can win 90 games again, but Cy Young seasons rarely repeat, Cuddyer's not really a replacement for Koskie, Mauer more than likely can't really catch (or shouldn't be), and they probably have a Bad Contract in Joe Mays. They have a huge built-in advantage in playing in That Thing They Call The Metrodome, but what happens if Silva and Nathan revert to their established levels, Bartlett isn't ready, Mauer can't catch, Santana doesn't pitch like Sandy Koufax Jr, and Morneau falls back even a little? They have as many questions -- or more -- than the White Sox, and the prevailing attitude seems to be, "Oh, well, they always win lately, so they'll win again." Will they? Will every break fall their way four years in a row? You can easily create a scenario where the Twins actually post a losing season.

The Tigers made huge improvements last season, but what were they thinking with Percival? Is Inge really their third baseman? I-Rod usually gets hurt, what happens when he goes down? Teams that make great leaps forward usually fall back.

The Indians apparently made huge improvements, too, although they ended up far lower than their fifty-seven-odd All Star selections would indicate. But they are counting on Jake Westbrook's health and improvement, Arthur Rhodes in the pen, possibly Kevin Millstone -- I mean Millwood, and repeating what looks awfully like a career-fluke-level season from Hafner.

The Royals just stunk. They tested the limits of an adrenaline rush in 2003 and collapsed last year... but teams that make huge steps backward usually rebound... they'll be better but not good.

If the Central Division fan blogosphere is any indication of what's really thought about in baseball, I'd say the odds are the rest of the division is counting on the Same Old White Sox... depending almost completely on the starting pitching, they could be in for one nasty surprise.
I think unlike "fans", the teams in the division actually recognize the improvements made by the sox...If you think Central division teams are overlooking the pitching improvements we've made in the same way posters here are, I think you think wrong.

johnny_mostil
01-01-2005, 02:16 PM
I think unlike "fans", the teams in the division actually recognize the improvements made by the sox...If you think Central division teams are overlooking the pitching improvements we've made in the same way posters here are, I think you think wrong.
Perhaps, but they aren't doing anything about it, are they?