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View Full Version : Players give the go-ahead on tougher steroid testing


hose
12-07-2004, 07:33 PM
Looks like something will get done on the steroid front.

Kudos to the players.

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20041207/ap_on_sp_ba_ne/bbo_steroids&cid=545

hose
12-07-2004, 07:39 PM
http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/cpress/20041204/lthumb.m120325a.jpg

"I want to start testing for flaxseed oil, pronto"

Erik The Red
12-07-2004, 07:54 PM
http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/cpress/20041204/lthumb.m120325a.jpg

"I want to start testing for flaxseed oil, pronto" Anyone catch Dan Patrick today? They got an e-mail from some middle-aged women who use flaxseed oil to treat menopausal symptoms. So, if nothing else, the players who used the stuff will never have to worry about hot flashes :redneck

Daver
12-07-2004, 08:03 PM
Looks like something will get done on the steroid front.

Kudos to the players.

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20041207/ap_on_sp_ba_ne/bbo_steroids&cid=545
If anyone should get credit for it, it should be the court of public opinion, because it is the only court the MLBPA can't fight.

The MLBPA bowed to the court of public opinion during negotiations for the last CBA, because Bud Selig did a fantastic job of selling the media, and therefore the masses, on his agenda. This time Bud has to do nothing, because the media has done all his work for him. The MLBPA has no choice but to agree to new standards, but it's aftereffects will impact the next CBA negotiation.

Nick@Nite
12-07-2004, 08:25 PM
Looks like something will get done on the steroid front.

Kudos to the players.

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20041207/ap_on_sp_ba_ne/bbo_steroids&cid=545Be still my heart.

hose
12-08-2004, 07:32 AM
If anyone should get credit for it, it should be the court of public opinion, because it is the only court the MLBPA can't fight.

The MLBPA bowed to the court of public opinion during negotiations for the last CBA, because Bud Selig did a fantastic job of selling the media, and therefore the masses, on his agenda. This time Bud has to do nothing, because the media has done all his work for him. The MLBPA has no choice but to agree to new standards, but it's aftereffects will impact the next CBA negotiation.

The bottom line is the players did the right thing and without them coming together Fehr would have defended the present drug testing program till the cows came home....or until the present cba ends.

I will agree with you that the players came under heavy public pressure to make changes . I would like to think that the majority of the players in the union are not doing steroids and used this "opportunity" to stand up and finally clean up their game.

I believe the present steroid problem is something that has really bothered most players as the Sox showed in spring training by trying to band together to force change. This is more then a preconceived publicity stunt to play to the public opinion like Sammy running around after 9-11 with American flags.

daveeym
12-08-2004, 10:33 AM
The bottom line is the players did the right thing and without them coming together Fehr would have defended the present drug testing program till the cows came home....or until the present cba ends.

I will agree with you that the players came under heavy public pressure to make changes . I would like to think that the majority of the players in the union are not doing steroids and used this "opportunity" to stand up and finally clean up their game.

I believe the present steroid problem is something that has really bothered most players as the Sox showed in spring training by trying to band together to force change. This is more then a preconceived publicity stunt to play to the public opinion like Sammy running around after 9-11 with American flags. Bottom line is don't hold your breath.

Flight #24
12-08-2004, 10:43 AM
IMO any program without year-round, random testing and significant suspensions for first offences is pure PR BS. It's hard enough with the 2 factors above given the ever-changing nature of the drugs, but without those 2 it's impossible to make any significant dent in usage.

Ol' No. 2
12-08-2004, 11:41 AM
Given past history, it's hard to be confident that any new program is going to be anything more than a fig leaf. We'll see...

JKryl
12-08-2004, 01:34 PM
It's a start, but it's interesting that they only mention steroids. Anyone have an idea on what the current MLB policy on other illicit drug use is?

cheeses_h_rice
12-08-2004, 02:04 PM
Supposedly they're talking about testing the same things that the Olympics tests for, which I assume includes HGH as well as things like amphetamines and other non-'roid performance enhancers. This is a start, but as was mentioned upthread, without the threat of serious punishment and/or banishment from the game, this seems like more window dressing b.s.

jackbrohamer
12-08-2004, 05:15 PM
Given past history, it's hard to be confident that any new program is going to be anything more than a fig leaf. We'll see...
Exactly. The current program is a total joke, anything they do in addition will automatically make the program more stringent. Selig, the players and sports media all share the same interest here: get the issue behind them as quickly as possible with minimal damage to Bonds and everyone else, and go back to business as usual.

ode to veeck
12-08-2004, 06:27 PM
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=544&ncid=703&e=2&u=/ap/20041208/ap_on_go_pr_wh/bush_steroids

The Wimperoo
12-08-2004, 06:40 PM
Unless HGH is included in the testing, which last I heard was not going to be, this will be an extreme waste of time.

Flight #24
12-09-2004, 04:37 PM
Interesting bit in Gammon's article: http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/gammons/story?id=1938586

Apologies if this has been posted before.


But during the 2002 Basic Agreement negotiations, Selig knew there were storm clouds on the horizon. "Bud was adamant that we had to get a tough drug-testing policy in that agreement because he believed the industry could be in for a major scandal if we didn't," said one member of the owners' committee. "But the couple of times we brought it up, Gene Orza went ballistic, at one point shouting obscenities. In the end, it came down to getting what we got, or shutting down the game with another strike, because to Gene and Don (Fehr), drug-testing was a strikeable issue. Bud didn't feel the game could take a strike at that time, and the drug-testing policy we got was a start." Then, of course, 7 percent of the players in 2003 were so dumb they tested positive, which permanently put the program into effect.

But Fehr and Orza always believed that any form of drug-testing was un-American in that it forced an individual to prove his innocence. However, by adamantly sticking to that civil libertarian line, they in fact have led players to a point where, because of this BALCO scandal, every player who hits more than 40 home runs is subject to having to prove himself innocent