PDA

View Full Version : Nightline: Sports Stadiums


Lip Man 1
11-29-2004, 07:27 PM
Interesting topic tonight (Monday) on Nighline after your late local news on ABC. This has been discussed here in connection with Uncle Jerry extorting a new stadium for the Sox.

Might be worth a look see:

If you build it, will they come?

November 29, 2004

Building new sports stadiums. Is it fair to put the burden on taxpayers?

Dear Nightline followers,

Today's broadcast:

There's a raging dispute about how to fund huge new sports stadiums in cities around the country. The question: should public money be used because they are an economic boom, or is this simply a taxpayer rip-off?

Arlington, Texas voted on Election Day to put more than $300 million into a new stadium for the Dallas Cowboys. Tomorrow, the Washington, D.C. City Council votes on public funding for a new stadium for the city's new major league team, The Washington Nationals. San Francisco is being asked to build a new stadium for the 49ers. Correspondent Jake Tapper reports.

Our guests: Jerry Jones, owner of the Dallas Cowboys; Gavin Newsom, Mayor of San Francisco; and Kevin Delaney, associate professor of sociology at Temple University and author of Public Dollars, Private Stadiums

Tom Bettag & the Nightline Staff
Nightline Offices
Washington, D.C.

Brian26
11-29-2004, 09:29 PM
Why the hell do the Cowboys need a new stadium? For 8 games a year? Give me a break.

DumpJerry
11-29-2004, 10:25 PM
Why the hell do the Cowboys need a new stadium? For 8 games a year? Give me a break.The Bears got one for their annual 8 games. It has been a tremendous help in their drive to the Super Bowl this year.

gregoriop
11-30-2004, 02:15 AM
Why the hell do the Cowboys need a new stadium? For 8 games a year? Give me a break. Actually, they don't. I'm in a class called Economics of Professional Sports and had to write a paper on this very topic. They don't have to share money on luxury boxes and obviously want more of them. The problem is the already have the most in the league. The stadium they had proposed was to seat 100,000 and they can't fill 65,000 now. Got to talk to the vp of marketing for the Colts...It's a fun class.


First post, btw.

white sox bill
11-30-2004, 06:18 AM
Actually, they don't. I'm in a class called Economics of Professional Sports and had to write a paper on this very topic. They don't have to share money on luxury boxes and obviously want more of them. The problem is the already have the most in the league. The stadium they had proposed was to seat 100,000 and they can't fill 65,000 now. Got to talk to the vp of marketing for the Colts...It's a fun class.


First post, btw.

Hey, welcome aboard!!:smile:

Frater Perdurabo
11-30-2004, 09:05 AM
A few days after the Cowboys signed their letter of intent with the city of Arlington to put the stadium funding measure on the Nov. 2 ballot, a group of private investors from the aviation industry devised an alternative proposal to build a Cowboys stadium entirely from private funds. This proposed stadium would have been in South Dallas (not unlike the SE side of Chicago: economically disadvantaged, lacking jobs, etc.) near the former Red Bird Airport (now Dallas Executive Airport).

The proposed stadium would have had all the features the Cowboys wanted: retractable roof, movable natural grass playing field, plus another: a giant gate that would have connected the floor of the stadium to a tarmac which connected to the taxiway at the airport. Once per month, the investors would have an expo of general aviation aircraft (Cessnas, Beechcraft, Lear Jets, Gulfstreams, etc.) inside the stadium.

In addition, coporate execs who rent the luxury suites for Cowboys games would be able to fly in to the airport and walk a few hundred yards (or take a limo) straight to the stadium.

The only request for public dollars would have been to extend the Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) light rail line to a new station at the airport/stadium. The station also would be beneficial to the residents and businesses in the area, as well as fans who did not want to drive to the game and pay parking fees. In my opinion this would have been a wise and prudent use of public dollars.

This proposal was all but ignored by both the local media and the Cowboys. Now that the dolts in Arlington passsed the measure, the deal is done. (Arlington is the largest city in the U.S. -- 365,000 population -- without any form of public transportation. Arlington voters consistently vote against public transit.)

I'm glad I don't live in Arlington. Even though I attend one or two Rangers games each year (when the Sox come to town), I plan to boycott Arlington to avoid having my money redistributed to a billionaire in the form of car rental/hotel/sales taxes.

The New England Patriots built their stadium entirely from private funds. A privately-financed stadium hasn't hurt them a bit; they have won 2 of the last 3 Super Bowls and are a favorite to reach the next one.

Spending public dollars on professional (or even college) sports stadiums is foolish and short-sighted, IMHO.