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View Full Version : "Ballparks: A Panoramic History" is another Blatant Attempt at Cubbie Revisionism


Hangar18
09-24-2004, 02:25 PM
The book, written by Marc Sandalow & Jim Sutton was given to me as a Gift
last week, and offers a photographic and written history of a teams ballpark.
They do so in a matter of fact tone and mostly do not offer opinions of their
own. The Book also nicely covers defunct stadiums as well with photographs
and anecdotes (did you know Shea Stadium was designed to be a DOME? but was scrapped when Engineers predicted the sheer weight would eventually collapse onto itself?)

The Urinal is displayed prominently on the books cover, and Fenway is on its back. Reading thru some of the stadiums, it was all pretty basic stuff, mostly things I already knew about these stadiums. Getting to UsCellular
Field, the writers wasted no time in regarding it, as "one of the most Maligned Parks in history" and correctly noted in the sections first sentence, "Comiskey was built out of duress". The section notes all of the bad things wrong with the park, things weve talked about here time and again, like the steep upper deck, and the senseless need for Layers of Skyboxes etc.
All fair enough in my eyes. The book calls the Metrodome as the only other architectural abomination, which again is fair enough. However the ripping comiskey took seemed a bit harsh, but deserved for a book like this.

I meandered over to Tropicana Field, a mausoleum with a baseball field in it.
The book gushed over the "real-looking" playing surface, the fact that palm-trees were inserted into the LF area of the Upper Deck, and that Tropicanas Field Dimensions Exactly replicate those of Ebbets Field. The Book gushes on about the Atrium of the park (which isnt visible to anyone watching the Game or on TV) and talks about the Quirks of hitting the catwalk and it being a HR, and how the dome outside reflects Orange, to show a home victory. I thought this place is HORRIBLE, but they make it sound (very Tribune/Kiley-esque if you will) like its one of the most quaint places around.

At this point, im not really buying these 2 clowns and their biased views.
I headed over to the Section on The Urinal.

"wrigley field is what every park wants to be". A bunch of gushing mumbo-jumbo about it being the most beautiful place to watch a baseball game on EARTH, is then followed by Praising Wrigley for sticking with the fact that
theyve NEVER had advertising Inside their Stadium, only Ivy (writer doesnt
mention fact that Wrigley ISNT ALLOWED to put advertising in the park/onthe walls, or it WOULDVE ALREADY)
" Wrigley is the birthplace of many baseball traditions..Including letting fans keep foul balls (and then not listing any more "traditions" as if the writer was looking for a way to use the word "tradition)

"In 1941, wrigley introduced Organ Music to baseball. Its HERE that Harry Caray, leaning outside his broadcast booth, microphone in one hand and poorly concealed beverage in other, made FAMOUS the tradition of singing Take-Me-Out-To-The-Ballgame during the 7th inning.......a tradition copied wherever Baseball is played.... at all levels"

Now correct me If Im wrong, and maybe some of the Elders here can answer this better. But did Harry Caray work for the Cubs in 1941? Did the Cubs
actually start the 7th Inning Stretch back then? Are we the ones who
actually copied this from them?

This book was a bunch of bs, simply because they ogled Fenway and Wrigley,
and altered history to make the Evil Empires park look better than it really is.

Fenway
09-24-2004, 02:34 PM
True fans know it was Bill Veeck that started Harry singing at Comiskey in either 76-77

It DOES appear Wrigley started the organ playing

A wonderful site

http://www.ballparktour.com/Organists.html

article mentions

http://www.ballparktour.com/torrent032404.jpg

Shay Torrent, Chicago White Sox, 1960-1964; California Angels, 1965-1986.



"In 1941, wrigley introduced Organ Music to baseball. Its HERE that Harry Caray, leaning outside his broadcast booth, microphone in one hand and poorly concealed beverage in other, made FAMOUS the tradition of singing Take-Me-Out-To-The-Ballgame during the 7th inning.......a tradition copied wherever Baseball is played.... at all levels"

Now correct me If Im wrong, and maybe some of the Elders here can answer this better. But did Harry Caray work for the Cubs in 1941? Did the Cubs
actually start the 7th Inning Stretch back then? Are we the ones who
actually copied this from them?

This book was a bunch of bs, simply because they ogled Fenway and Wrigley,
and altered history to make the Evil Empires park look better than it really is.

Baby Fisk
09-24-2004, 02:36 PM
LIES! LIES! LIES!

Harry freakin Caray was a St. Louis announcer, then a Sox announcer, then finally went to the Cubs in the 80s. But I don't think they meant Harry was actually there in 1941.

Back in the 70s it was Bill Veeck who overheard Caray singing "TMOTTBG" to himself at Comiskey Park during a 7th inning stretch. Veeck thought it was great and had it recorded and amplified, and eventually it morphed into Harry singing it live every game. It is a tradition, like the HR fireworks, first created in Comiskey Park and copied everywhere else.

I'm surprised they didn't call Wrigley "the baseball palace of the world". :angry:

The BS mythologizing of the Cubs franchise boggles my mind.

Hangar18
09-24-2004, 02:48 PM
LIES! LIES! LIES!

Harry freakin Caray was a St. Louis announcer, then a Sox announcer, then finally went to the Cubs in the 80s. But I don't think they meant Harry was actually there in 1941.

Back in the 70s it was Bill Veeck who overheard Caray singing "TMOTTBG" to himself at Comiskey Park during a 7th inning stretch. Veeck thought it was great and had it recorded and amplified, and eventually it morphed into Harry singing it live every game. It is a tradition, like the HR fireworks, first created in Comiskey Park and copied everywhere else.

The BS mythologizing of the Cubs franchise boggles my mind.
I know what the writers were trying to do. Its a common here in the Chicago Media, something we call a KILEY-ISM. Put one fact in front of something that isnt a fact, and the reader will automatically assume that BOTH must be true, simply because it was used in that context. For instance, Kiley wrote this once "....widely assumed that cub fans are the most knowledgable, Baker was asked if he worried about decisions he makes".
Baker goes on to answer the question, with cub fans being smart being assumed, Never once being SMART himself and ASKING KILEY WHO SAID CUB FANS WERE SMART to begin with. I can see how this BullJive Mythologizing this Bogus Organization has everyone believing this.

for the record, the book was too busy Blasting COmiskey and didnt mention
how we 1st did the fireworks, the 7th inning stretch, the "curtain-call" for players after key home-runs, the great food, etc etc.

Hangar18
09-24-2004, 02:55 PM
:sahaf
" It is all great lies this Hangar speaks of! The great Harry Caray,
was a very famous slugger, he was hero of 1918 cubs world series,
with many many homeruns for the cub.
Caray go to broadcast booth for the hero cubs after he retired from
cubs in 1941. Harry has sung Take-Me-Out since 1941, harry
is great great hero. We removed Fireworks from our Scoreboard
in 1950 because we didnt like this no more, many teams have copied
our greatness!"

Baby Fisk
09-24-2004, 02:57 PM
I know what the writers were trying to do. Its a common here in the Chicago Media, something we call a KILEY-ISM. Put one fact in front of something that isnt a fact, and the reader will automatically assume that BOTH must be true, simply because it was used in that context. For instance, Kiley wrote this once "....widely assumed that cub fans are the most knowledgable, Baker was asked if he worried about decisions he makes".
Baker goes on to answer the question, with cub fans being smart being assumed, Never once being SMART himself and ASKING KILEY WHO SAID CUB FANS WERE SMART to begin with. I can see how this BullJive Mythologizing this Bogus Organization has everyone believing this.

for the record, the book was too busy Blasting COmiskey and didnt mention
how we 1st did the fireworks, the 7th inning stretch, the "curtain-call" for players after key home-runs, the great food, etc etc.Did the Sox inaugurate the curtain call? Helpingstine's book talks about how some Sox "curtain calls" pissed off KC players in the 70s. I think some Royals started doing it in retaliation/mockery when that rivalry was at its peak.

Clembasbal
09-24-2004, 03:14 PM
In "Take Me Out To The Ballpark" by Josh Leventhal you have him giving credit where credit is due. Nothing about HArry Carey in any of the sections about the Cubs or Sox, but he does say that the Sox used the first "Exploding scoreboard"

He also says that Veeck did most of the changes to Wrigley, though he is better know on the Southside. And that the cages on the walls at the urinal where put in place to stop fans from interfearing and " and also from "misplaceing" items onto the field." Seems to me that he is making fun of them for being drunks.

Anyway, this book is better though about 3-4 years old - so not all the new stadiums and facts are up-to-date. I like this one, it is more truthful.

bigfoot
09-24-2004, 05:26 PM
The section devoted to the Urinal should have been entitled "The Paranoiac History of the Crumbling Confines". Replete with the near hysterical reverence that Lovable Loser faithful pay to the "Latrine with Bleachers".