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Fenway
09-04-2004, 11:54 AM
I never in a million years would have thought Harold Baines would have more career homers than Jim Rice

Sure Baines played more seasons but I am still stunned that he was that high lifetime.


Manny Ramirez's solo shot in the first inning off John Wasdin was his 37th homer of the season and the 384th of his career, tying him with Harold Baines for 46th on the all-time list. Dwight Evans ranks 45th with 385 homers

pinwheels3530
09-04-2004, 12:55 PM
That's because you need to stop listening to ESPN telling you that Boson & NY are the greatest at everything! Well maybe NY :D: but not Boston:tongue:

idseer
09-04-2004, 01:45 PM
I never in a million years would have thought Harold Baines would have more career homers than Jim Rice

Sure Baines played more seasons but I am still stunned that he was that high lifetime.


i have no idea why you thought that. :?:

The Critic
09-04-2004, 04:47 PM
Baines had consistent power numbers, not as flashy as Rice's power, maybe, but he was always up there in bombs.
In his prime, Harold was a VERY dangerous hitter, and when his knees were right he was a tremendous outfielder too.
I think it's easy to forget how good he was because he didn't toot his own horn and writers always look towards the "quote machines" first.

Fenway
09-04-2004, 07:57 PM
Baines had consistent power numbers, not as flashy as Rice's power, maybe, but he was always up there in bombs.
In his prime, Harold was a VERY dangerous hitter, and when his knees were right he was a tremendous outfielder too.
I think it's easy to forget how good he was because he didn't toot his own horn and writers always look towards the "quote machines" first.Well Rice certainly wasn't a reporters darling either

I remember a game at Comiskey in 1983 when Rice hit two rifle shots into the lower deck at Comiskey that would have been SINGLES at Fenway

http://retrosheet.org/boxesetc/B08260CHA1983.htm

But as much as Rice despised the media he did read the papers

prime example on July 4 1984 Bob Ryan wrote in the Boston Globe

Jim Rice is on the final year of a contract. He is 31 years old, and he wants the next contract he signs to be a whopper in excess of $1.5 million a year. The Red Sox have taken the public stance that Rice is too valuable a baseball property to lose.

I believe it's a safe statement that many fans - not all, but many - believe otherwise.

Just for fun, I examined the battered scorebook I've been using since the start of the 1978 season. In it are 83 Red Sox games, over half (44) of which took place in 1978, which was Rice's greatest season. Here is what I learned.


In those 83 games, only seven of which were on the road, Rice hit .323, with 25 homers, 13 doubles, 7 triples, 15 walks and 85 RBIs. During innings one through six, he hit .354 (81 for 229), with 20 homers, 9 doubles, 5 triples, 8 walks and 66 RBIs. This leaves him with the following numbers for innings seven through whatever (17 being the latest): .269, with 5 homers, 4 doubles, 2 triples, 7 walks and 19 RBIs.


His 1978 totals included a decent amount of clutch hits. In one June contest against the A's, for example, he tied the game in the seventh with a two-run homer and won it with a triple his next time up. And he was an absolute killer early, making sure there wasn't anything to worry about. Of the first 12 games I recorded that season, he hit four first-inning home runs and a first-inning run-producing triple. The Red Sox won all those games. I must conclude that many of his 139 RBIs that season were important, by anyone's standards.

But the other games in my book aren't so flattering to Rice. In 1979, I've got 18 games, during which he hit .423 with nine homers and 15 ribbies in the first six innings and .237 with no homers and one RBI afterward. Wow. Was 1978 an aberration? I honestly don't know.


Perception is everything to the fan. Those who don't believe in Rice contend he is horribly impatient in big situations, habitually accumulating the world's fastest 0-and-2 counts. It's also undeniable that he is both a big strikeout man and a double-play producer. His free-swinging style is very frustrating in certain situations.

Consider, in any case, that batting in so-called clutch situations, often against a topflight reliever, is much more difficult than batting in the third inning. For all any of us know, what Rice accomplishes is in the mainstream of slugging accomplishments whether we like it or not.

Even if he is not what people want him to be, he is apparently better than almost everything else out there. No slugger, not even Babe Ruth, could ever please all the people all the time. Consider that guys such as George Foster, Greg Luzinski and Dave Parker have all flashed across the sky since Rice first came into the big leagues, and he is still producing while they are not. Moreover, Schmidt and Cooper are 35 and, aside from Dale Murphy (who, like Murray, is 28), there are few potential Rices hiding out on big league rosters these days.

Rice is not the second coming of Jimmie Foxx. But on a strict talent basis, I have a feeling that the Sox would benefit from a few more Rices, not a few less.

As far as signing him goes, its like Ann Landers always says to a woman wondering whether or not she should leave her husband: "Will your life be better off with him, or without him?"


We all await the Red Sox' answer.

That afternoon


RED SOX 10TH: Barrett singled; Hoffman reached on an error on a
sacrifice bunt by Morgan [Barrett to second]; Boggs out on a
sacrifice bunt (third to second) [Barrett to third, Hoffman to
second]; Evans was walked intentionally; GUTIERREZ RAN FOR
HOFFMAN; Rice homered [Barrett scored, Gutierrez scored
(unearned), Evans scored]; 4 R, 2 H, 1 E, 0 LOB. Athletics 9,
Red Sox 13.

Final Totals R H E LOB
Athletics 9 14 2 7
Red Sox 13 14 2 7



Rice as he crossed home plate threw the finger at the press box

Daver
09-04-2004, 08:00 PM
Baines had consistent power numbers, not as flashy as Rice's power, maybe, but he was always up there in bombs.
In his prime, Harold was a VERY dangerous hitter, and when his knees were right he was a tremendous outfielder too.
I think it's easy to forget how good he was because he didn't toot his own horn and writers always look towards the "quote machines" first.
Baines played a few years in Comiskey Park, where flyballs went to die.

PaleHoseGeorge
09-04-2004, 08:36 PM
...I think it's easy to forget how good he [Baines] was because he didn't toot his own horn and writers always look towards the "quote machines" first.
Whaddya mean? :smile:

:nandrolone
"I am a gladiator!"

:moron
"Sammy, I want to have your baby."

WinningUgly!
09-04-2004, 10:14 PM
Whaddya mean? :smile:

:nandrolone
"I am a gladiator!"

:moron
"Sammy, I want to have your baby."
http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/winningugly/sigs/jaybaby.JPG

SoxFan76
09-05-2004, 12:07 AM
http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/winningugly/sigs/jaybaby.JPG
WU, you've done it again. You are amazing.

BigEdWalsh
09-05-2004, 08:28 AM
http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/winningugly/sigs/jaybaby.JPG
:rolling: That baby is sooooo cute!!!:gulp:

The Critic
09-05-2004, 08:45 AM
http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/winningugly/sigs/jaybaby.JPG
Absolutely HILARIOUS!!!!:D:

Nellie_Fox
09-06-2004, 01:02 AM
You are looking at the spawn of Satan.

1951Campbell
09-06-2004, 08:47 PM
:rolling: That baby is sooooo cute!!!:gulp:
Yeah, but that big head has really gotta smart coming out...

voodoochile
09-06-2004, 09:28 PM
http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/winningugly/sigs/jaybaby.JPG'

I am freaking dying here...:roflmao: :rolling: