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Lip Man 1
08-11-2004, 12:34 AM
Some KEY dates and events today!

8-11-64: Sox 6 at N.Y. 4 AND Sox 8 N.Y. 2. Behind the pitching of Joe Horlen and Juan Pizarro the Sox sweep a pair at Yankee Stadium. Their record is a terrific 69-44 and they are only a game behind the first place Orioles.

8-11-72: Sox 1 at Oak.0 Needing a win desperately after dropping a 19 inning game, ex Cub journeyman Dave Lemonds outpitched ‘Catfish’ Hunter in the best game of his career. He goes 6.2 innings allowing only two hits. Cy Acosta wrapped it up for the save. The only run of the game scored in the first when Carlos May singled home Pat Kelly. A classic pitcher's duel. Sox record was 64-45, one game behind the A’s.

8-11-83: Sox 9 Balt. 3. With Tom Paciorek driving in four runs and Floyd Bannister striking out eleven O’s it was an easy game. The Sox moved to 61-51 on the year and stretched their lead to five and a half games over K.C.

8-11-91: Sox 1 at Balt. 0 In only his second major league start, rookie Wilson Alvarez throws a no hitter in Baltimore. He walked five, struck out seven, including Randy Milligan to end it. Lance Johnson played a terrific center field with six putouts and a no hitter saving catch in the 7th inning. This was the high water mark for the Sox at 65-45 only one game behind Minnesota.

8-11-94: The Sox had the day off and were in Oakland waiting to see if a last minute labor settlement could be had to avoid a strike. After the Seattle / Oakland game the union walked off the job citing unfair labor practices and a refusal of the owners to bargain in good faith. (Those charges were upheld in federal court.) The Sox left, leading Cleveland by one game in the division, they had the third best record in baseball behind the Expos and Yankees. Their record was 67-46 and they had beaten New York 4 out of 6 on the year. Baseball owners eventually called off the rest of the season, including the post season in mid September. One of those deeply involved in the labor war was Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf who appeared to sabotage his own team in the interest of getting a salary cap.

"I thought that we were going to be out longer then a week or ten days but I never felt the rest of the year was going to be cancelled. The Sox felt that we had to be in first place when the strike hit because we didn’t know what could happen. The last month, the Sox went with a four man rotation. My last three wins were all complete games and all on three days rest. It turned out we did finish the year in first." –Jack McDowell

"Several hard-line owners who favor an all out war with the union-similar to the one that resulted in the sixty-day midseason strike of 1981-have sided with Selig and Reinsdorf. Put Gene Autry of the Angels, Carl Pohland of the Twins and Doug Danforth of the Pirates in that group. ‘We have a small group of extreme owners who fantasize that they’re just one showdown (with the union) away from nirvana,’ said a member of baseball’s Executive Council. ‘They don’t seem to have much sense of baseball history."–Thomas Boswell, columnist, Washington Post, July 8, 1992.

"The hawks picked up even more support with a Jerry Reinsdorf inspired procedural change. It would now take twenty one votes– 75 percent of the Lords– to approve settlement of a strike or lockout. The super majority rule vastly changed the dynamics from the old requirement of fifteen votes. It would take just eight votes to veto a proposed settlement. The hard liners easily commanded such numbers." – From the book The Lords Of The Realm by John Helyar. Pg. 594.

"The players bridled, in turn, when David Glass (the Royals owner) began the second day’s meeting with a homily on how they should help baseball better compete for the entertainment dollar. Nor did the players’ mood brighten when Jerry Reinsdorf offered his version of ‘Give us a number!’ ‘Let’s do a deal,’ he said, ‘Just tell us the percentage you want.’ There was no response. Reinsdorf persisted: ‘What percentage do you want?’ ‘How much profit do you want?’ Don Fehr finally shot back. That was the end of the sessions and as it turned out, the end of the meetings." – From the book The Lords Of The Realm by John Helyar. Pg. 599-600.

"Jerry Reinsdorf was not used to losing battles. The White Sox, which he almost lost to increasing debts a few years after putting together a group of investors for the team, had become the second most profitable team in baseball, and was successful on the field as well. Baseball, was without a commissioner, due largely to Reinsdorf’s manipulations, and the baseball union was naming him the power behind the management- labor struggle that had brought the sport to a standstill."– Sam Smith. From the book Second Coming. Pg. 15.

"I think Jerry Reinsdorf greatly underestimated fan backlash to the strike. Reinsdorf must have realized the strike would turn some fans away from the game, but I don’t think he realized the lasting impact it would have. The effects went beyond the disappointment Sox fans felt watching a rare chance to go to a World Series vanish in the midst of a power struggle between owners and players. Though we all know baseball is a business, we fans still have a somewhat childlike reverence for the game. 1994 destroyed some of that reverence. Time won’t change those feelings." – Dan Helpinstein. From the book Through Hope And Despair. Pgs. 182-183.

"I’m a dove, until they strike." ––Jerry Reinsdorf, August 1994. Comment printed in the Chicago newspapers after he spoke with the media from his luxury box at Comiskey Park.

"The Sox had their best team decades- led by guitar-playing pitcher Jack McDowell and young slugger Frank Thomas, they were 21 games over .500 when baseball shut down- only to see it neutered by the strike, with management’s biggest nut cutter being the Sox’ chairman, Jerry Reinsdorf. " – Rick Telander from the Sports Illustrated story, ‘Hey Chicago, Wait Till This Year.’ April 7, 2003.

Lip

ode to veeck
08-11-2004, 10:03 AM
Lip,

thanks for the daily Sox history highlights, it helps ease the sufferings of the current Sox doldrums. I'd love to see a Horlon/Pizarro double header again!

RKMeibalane
08-11-2004, 02:34 PM
August 11, 2002: The Sox defeated the Seattle Mariners by the score of 6-5. Highlights from this game included Joe "Long Swing" Crede's first Major League home run.

Lip Man 1
08-11-2004, 08:31 PM
Actually it was at Tampa Bay not Seattle.


Lip

Brian26
08-11-2004, 08:35 PM
Some KEY dates and events today!
8-11-83: Sox 9 Balt. 3. With Tom Paciorek driving in four runs and Floyd Bannister striking out eleven O’s it was an easy game. The Sox moved to 61-51 on the year and stretched their lead to five and a half games over K.C.

Wow, can that record be correct? We finished the '83 season at 99-63. So, from Aug 11 to the end of the season we went 38-12? Can that be correct? Mercy.

RKMeibalane
08-11-2004, 08:38 PM
Actually it was at Tampa Bay not Seattle.


Lip
What?

dcb33
08-11-2004, 09:15 PM
Wow, can that record be correct? We finished the '83 season at 99-63. So, from Aug 11 to the end of the season we went 38-12? Can that be correct? Mercy.
It is correct. Go to http://www.baseball-almanac.com/teamstats/schedule.php?y=1983&t=CHA if you'd like to see how it happened....

Now, if we could only get the current Sox to go 38-12 instead of making the ilk of Darrell May and Brian Anderson look like Cy Young...

Cubbiesuck13
08-11-2004, 09:18 PM
It is correct. Go to http://www.baseball-almanac.com/teamstats/schedule.php?y=1983&t=CHA if you'd like to see how it happened....

Now, if we could only get the current Sox to go 38-12 instead of making the ilk of Darrell May and Brian Anderson look like Cy Young...


Now that is my kind of streaky.

Cubbiesuck13
08-11-2004, 09:32 PM
I was looking at the stats for La Marr Hoyt and noticed after one good year with the Padres he never did much after the Oz trade. Who was the sox GM in 85? They sure dumped him at the right time. Was 83 the last time two sox pitchers won 20 games in a season?

Brian26
08-11-2004, 09:47 PM
I was looking at the stats for La Marr Hoyt and noticed after one good year with the Padres he never did much after the Oz trade. Who was the sox GM in 85? They sure dumped him at the right time. Was 83 the last time two sox pitchers won 20 games in a season?
Hemond made the trade. He was a believer in selling high, buying low. That's how he picked up Hoyt from the Yankees in the first place.