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View Full Version : Screamalotti's at it again


DVG
09-29-2001, 06:38 AM
:moron

How Dare YOU???? How dare you spitball-lobbing knuckleheads
take shots at our Sammy? He was born poor in the Dominican
Republic!!!!! What do you jealous fools know about that???
What he did the other night was one of the finest acts of patriotism ever in the history of our country. You fools could take
lessons from our Sammy!!! He is Benjamin Franklin, Thomas
Jefferson, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Doug-
lass, the Iwo Jima flag-raisers and Lee Greenwood all combined
into one gloriously gifted, freedom-loving god in human form.
His warm, kind spirit and compassionate nature are just what
this country needs.

Ah, but what would you know about that? You just think he's an
ignorant foreigner, not worthy to carry our flag. There. Just
thought I'd get that cheap shot in and imply that you're all a bunch of ignorant, foreigner-hating rednecks. See ya, scum Sox
fans.

GASHWOUND
09-29-2001, 07:09 AM
I read the above thread and couldn't believe my eyes, so I just thought i go take a look and saw it for myself.

JAY MARIOTTI SUN-TIMES COLUMNIST
He won't break the home-run record. He won't be the MVP of his league. He won't perform in the postseason glow for the ninth time in 10 years of Cubness. But look closer at Sammy Sosa, past his frustrated and sad eyes, and you'll see a man who is about to achieve his most important distinction.
Baseball, it seems, now has no finer ambassador.
When Cal Ripken Jr. says goodbye in Baltimore next weekend, the game will lose its greatest object of affection and reverence. The ideal successor is Sosa, whose ability to spread warmth and joy at the ballpark is a magical gift in troubled times. Amazing, isn't it, that he continues to attract national attention even as Barry Bonds nears 70 homers and the Cubs fade from playoff contention. That's because Sammy is so much more than a ballplayer with a lethal bat. He is a showman with a big heart, a precious commodity at a time when sports, like the world, waits at a shaky crossroads.
Let Bonds make slugging history. Sosa made a more profound statement for the ages the other night, when he hit his 59th homer, accepted a miniature American flag from first-base coach Billy Williams and carried it proudly as he chugged around the bases at Wrigley Field. I happened to be sitting near the field, and when the flag whipped in the wind as he rounded third, the rush of emotion was staggering. Dads lifted their young sons onto their shoulders. Neighborhood party kids put down their $5 beers and hugged friends. Older fans wiped away tears. The commotion was loud three years ago when Sosa passed Roger Maris on the home-run list, but not this loud and certainly not this heartfelt.
"If you want to insert that into one of Sammy's movies, it would be an appropriate thing to do,'' manager Don Baylor said.
Never have the confines been more friendly, more peaceful. It was one of those vintage convergences--God and country, Cubs and Sammy, Wayne Messmer with the microphone--that could have been corny but instead hit home with everyone. Well, almost everyone. Absurdly, there was some negative feedback from the usual anti-Sosa pack, claiming he was staging and milking the scene. The temptation is to ask them to catch the next one-way flight to Bora Bora, but instead, I will re-explain to the knuckleheads what they missed while shooting spitballs in grade school. Sosa's patriotic romp is just the symbolism that defines America as the land of the free, the home of the brave. He grew up amid Third World poverty in the Dominican Republic, trying to catch balls with milk cartons and hit pitches with broomsticks while waiting for weekends to take showers at a local factory. If not for this country, where would Sammy be? When he says, "I love America. What a country,'' he means it more than anyone knows. What do you think all this is, a gag? It was a special way to express his appreciation, and if 38,000 roaring voices meant anything, Sosa struck the right tone.
Sure, he planned it. So? It was a splendid brainstorm, something no one else has come up with in a sports world that generally has been impressive in reacting to the national tragedy. Too often, Americans complain about non-Americans who don't show enough respect for this country. Shouldn't we praise Sosa for openly showing his love and thanks? I would like to think his critics in this case are just jealous White Sox fans. Unfortunately, they are fools who view Sosa as an ignorant foreigner who has no right to carry our flag on our turf. Nothing could be further from the truth.
"Billy and I talked about this. And I said to myself if God gave me an opportunity to hit a home run, it's a good time for myself, especially here at home, to do that,'' Sosa said. "Everybody knows that I never show anybody up. It was a moment where I had to do what I had to do. It was a moment you want to be there for. It's something that doesn't happen every day. What happened in New York affected everybody, the whole world.''
A few reporters broached the issue of Sosa's trot in the Houston clubhouse, asking the Astros if he was trying to show them up. Still only 2-1/2 weeks after the horrific events, the question needn't be asked. What does a flag-carrying player have to do with something as trivial as a pennant race? Fortunately, the Astros understood the magnitude of the moment and didn't object.
"Sammy's a good guy, a real popular guy and a professional, no doubt,'' said Astros pitcher Shane Reynolds, who allowed the first-inning homer. "He hits his home runs, does his hop and runs around the bases. He doesn't stare, doesn't try to show you up or anything. With what's happened with the tragic things that happened in New York and Washington ... that's OK. I wish he wouldn't have hit a home run, but that's OK. Surely, it was a patriotic thing, not a show-anybody-up thing.''
Said Astros reliever Billy Wagner: "Sammy is a classy guy who never tries to show up anyone. We knew that. If we thought he was showing us up, there would have been some repercussions.''
The demise of the Cubs means Sosa won't be the National League MVP. It's a shame--no player has been more responsible for his team's success, as evidenced by the team's otherwise mediocre offense--but a close three-man race probably will be decided by whose team makes the playoffs. If the Giants make a late charge into the postseason, Bonds will be the MVP. If not, Arizona's Luis Gonzalez could win it, even if Bonds breaks 70.
As the seasons pass, Sosa increasingly resembles a modern Ernie Banks, doomed to offset a Hall of Fame career without playoff success. If ever a personality was made for autumn theater, it is his. But these are the Cubs. They don't do October. Funny, if the proposed trade had gone through last year, he'd be pursuing his second world championship with the Yankees. Now, we wonder if he'll ever win a playoff game.
Even if his teams fail, no one can take away his charm. A lot of losers and wannabes have tried, especially in the media, but Sammy Sosa stands tall today as an exemplary figure in our culture. He can wave the American flag anytime he likes.
September 30, 2001


Can we go to the offices of the Sun-Times and protest the employment of Moronotti? How is this guy even have a job as a columnist? I never seen a guy every week just kiss the ass of sCrub fans and RIP all Sox fans and players. I want to go choke that guy. But I will refrain from violence cause I'm a peaceful guy. He just makes me sick!!!!!!!!!!

PaleHoseGeorge
09-29-2001, 01:34 PM
Originally posted by GASHWOUND
Can we go to the offices of the Sun-Times and protest the employment of Moronotti? How is this guy even have a job as a columnist? I never seen a guy every week just kiss the ass of sCrub fans and RIP all Sox fans and players. I want to go choke that guy. But I will refrain from violence cause I'm a peaceful guy. He just makes me sick!!!!!!!!!!


The best protest is to simply contact the Sun-Times and cancel your subscription. Make very clear you as a Chicagoan are tired of their sports columnist Jay Mariotti writing such sensationalistic crap--especially when it includes needless shots at Sox fans, of which you are one.

You can also contact the Daily Southtown, the Daily Herald, or even the Tribune, start a subscription, then contact the Sun-Times to tell them why you just subscribed to a competitor. Get the Sun-Times sales agent's name and address, and mail them a photocopy of your first bill from the competing newspaper with a short note reminding them again why you aren't a subscriber to the Sun-Times.

Believe me, the Sun-Times is eating it up that so many of us are posting links and articles to Jay's columns. It's great for business. Their editors need to know Mariotti's vitriol is having the opposite effect.

If you can't do any of the above, simply ignore him. Never refer to him by his real name. Speak of him strictly in the third person and the name of the newspaper as "that other Chicago rag". Don't give either Mariotti or the Scum-Times ANY publicity. Deny them what they want more than anything else.

If you want to be pro-active, that's my advice.

WinningUgly!
09-29-2001, 11:53 PM
What do you expect from the guy? He writes this crap with a mouthfull of Samme

ihatethecubs
09-30-2001, 01:57 PM
if i ever saw him in person i would punch him, seriously.

doublem23
10-01-2001, 12:29 AM
Originally posted by ihatethecubs
if i ever saw him in person i would punch him, seriously.

Join the club.

RichieRichAllen
10-01-2001, 01:42 AM
Originally posted by ihatethecubs
if i ever saw him in person i would punch him, seriously.

Well, where I come from, that might buy you a little jail time, pilgrim.

Aw, hell........

*Whack* *Crash* *Thump*

CLR01
10-01-2001, 03:03 AM
Originally posted by RichieRichAllen


Well, where I come from, that might buy you a little jail time, pilgrim.


At the absolute worst an hour or two in a holding cell until someone comes to bail him out. Ofcourse the moron would probably press charges, and he would get probation and maybe some community service time. But what the hell, you have to have something exciting to tell the grand-children.


"You better believe i would press charges. First i would write a story telling everyone how some scum sox fan tried to attact me but i kicked his ass and he ran and then i would sue him and his family and put them in the poor house. Hahahaha...wait a minute all scum sox fans are already poor, low-life pieces of garbage so i cant do that. It'll be delicious."

:moron

chisoxt
10-01-2001, 09:28 AM
Can we go to the offices of the Sun-Times and protest the employment of Moronotti? How is this guy even have a job as a columnist?


I went one step better. I cancelled my subscription to that rag a month ago.

Daver
10-01-2001, 06:13 PM
Originally posted by CLR01


At the absolute worst an hour or two in a holding cell until someone comes to bail him out. Ofcourse the moron would probably press charges, and he would get probation and maybe some community service time. But what the hell, you have to have something exciting to tell the grand-children.


"You better believe i would press charges. First i would write a story telling everyone how some scum sox fan tried to attact me but i kicked his ass and he ran and then i would sue him and his family and put them in the poor house. Hahahaha...wait a minute all scum sox fans are already poor, low-life pieces of garbage so i cant do that. It'll be delicious."

:moron

Tough to press charges from a casket,unless you trust Fluffy to do it for you.