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Jerry_Manuel
09-29-2001, 12:40 AM
From the Trib:
Biddle watch: Rocky Biddle's surgery took place Friday, and a small tear was discovered in his right labrum. The rehab time is expected to be four months.

Chisox_cali
09-29-2001, 02:06 AM
has anyone heard ANYTHING about ANY of our other labrum group???? Parque Osuna Wunsch etc.

Vsahajpal
09-29-2001, 02:47 AM
Extensive study of throwing athletes has provided insight into the tremendous forces bearing on the shoulder. In the act of throwing (see figure 1 in the article, "Elbow Injuries in Young Baseball Players"), the arm is abducted about 100 throughout most of the motion. External shoulder rotation of 175, including scapulothoracic motion and trunk extension, is common. In the follow-through phase, up to 105 of internal rotation has been measured. In addition, the speed of arm rotation has been calculated at an astonishing 7,000 per second. These factors impose tremendous torque on the shoulder, particularly during deceleration. If these forces are not modulated and controlled by the soft tissues of the shoulder, injury follows (1,2).

Electromyography studies have shown that during the acceleration phase, the pectoralis major, serratus anterior, latissimus dorsi, and subscapularis muscles are actively contracting while the rotator cuff and biceps are relatively silent. Conversely, during the deceleration phase, the rotator cuff and trunk muscles show the most activity (3).

http://www.physsportsmed.com/issues/1999/06_99/richards.htm

PaleHoseGeorge
09-29-2001, 03:08 AM
Originally posted by Vsahajpal
Extensive study of throwing athletes has provided insight into the tremendous forces bearing on the shoulder. In the act of throwing (see figure 1 in the article, "Elbow Injuries in Young Baseball Players"), the arm is abducted about 100 throughout most of the motion. External shoulder rotation of 175, including scapulothoracic motion and trunk extension, is common. In the follow-through phase, up to 105 of internal rotation has been measured. In addition, the speed of arm rotation has been calculated at an astonishing 7,000 per second. These factors impose tremendous torque on the shoulder, particularly during deceleration. If these forces are not modulated and controlled by the soft tissues of the shoulder, injury follows (1,2)....



There. Isn't this what I've been telling you guys for months now!

:)

MikeKreevich
09-29-2001, 07:22 AM
Even the motion of raising 12 ounces of liquid in an arc from the center line of the body to the region of the head can be potentially dangerous to the labrum.

voodoochile
09-29-2001, 11:11 AM
Originally posted by Guzman's Goat
Even the motion of raising 12 ounces of liquid in an arc from the center line of the body to the region of the head can be potentially dangerous to the labrum.

Yeah, whenever I do that motion too often, I invariably trip and injure my shoulder trying to catch myself. Sometimes I just lean to hard against the toilet and my labrum is killing me in the morning...

:)