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View Full Version : The Cell: Baseball's New Launching Pad & Implications for the Sox


Procol Harum
07-08-2004, 10:34 AM
I don't think I've seen this addressed at any length here, but if I just haven't been observant, apologies.

At any rate, I think we've all noticed the way that the ball has been flying out of the Cell since the park's upper deck was reconfigured in the off-season. While this could be just an endightment against the current Sox pitching staff (and Lord knows they seem to like to give up the gopher ball), it does seem as if there has been a major change in the way that the wind takes very average fly balls and dumps them over the fence. Through last night, the Sox have hit 116 hrs, 71 of those at home. For comparison's sake the Twinks, by contrast, have hit a total of 92 hrs, 45 at home, 47 on the road (two more than our "sluggers"). Although I don't have hard data, according to our broadcasters, the Cell has now hosted more hrs this season than Coors Field--and this in a wet, cool spring and early summer. What happens when it gets hot?

Among the questions that arise are several:

1. Is this just a temporary blip, more the result of really bad pitching?

2. If not, how do the Sox approach building a ballclub suited to winning in this environment (power hitters, ground ball pitchers, etc.) over the next several years?

3. Can this club--as currently constituted--get it done in the new environment in 2004?

Whaddya think?

DaveIsHere
07-08-2004, 10:43 AM
Actually the ball flies out better in cooler weather than hot, so hopefully it gets hot out

Dadawg_77
07-08-2004, 10:45 AM
I don't think I've seen this addressed at any length here, but if I just haven't been observant, apologies.

At any rate, I think we've all noticed the way that the ball has been flying out of the Cell since the park's upper deck was reconfigured in the off-season. While this could be just an endightment against the current Sox pitching staff (and Lord knows they seem to like to give up the gopher ball), it does seem as if there has been a major change in the way that the wind takes very average fly balls and dumps them over the fence. Through last night, the Sox have hit 116 hrs, 71 of those at home. For comparison's sake the Twinks, by contrast, have hit a total of 92 hrs, 45 at home, 47 on the road (two more than our "sluggers"). Although I don't have hard data, according to our broadcasters, the Cell has now hosted more hrs this season than Coors Field--and this in a wet, cool spring and early summer. What happens when it gets hot?

At
Among the questions that arise are several:

1. Is this just a temporary blip, more the result of really bad pitching?

2. If not, how do the Sox approach building a ballclub suited to winning in this environment (power hitters, ground ball pitchers, etc.) over the next several years?

3. Can this club--as currently constituted--get it done in the new environment in 2004?

Whaddya think?Well Hawk and DJ like the spew **** with out ever thinking about it. Yes there are more homers at the Cell then Coors field, 130 to 111. But they never stopped to consider the fact the Sox have tons more power then Rockies. Visiting team has hit 59 homers at the Cell and 54 at Coors. How much of this is explained by better teams at the Cell and DHs not pitchers hitting at the Cell is unknown. What is interesting is the Rockies have hit 43 homers on the road while 57 at home. Sox have hit 45 homers on the road and in two more games 71 at home. There are several factors in that, inter-league play forced one of the Sox better hitters out of the lineup for six games, which cost the Sox at some chances at home runs on the road and there are less band boxes in the AL then in the NL. So while there are lot of homers being hit in the Cell this year, it could be randomness of the game and nothing at all.

I think you keep the offense the way it is, it can score. And I wouldn't worry too much about ground ball pitchers but I would love to see high strike out pitchers, thus less ball put in play. The I am like with Garcia is his K rates went through the roof, the only problem they are head and shoulders above what he did in Seattle this year, so you must wonder if he can keep it up.

Yes but another strike out pitcher would greatly help.

Iguana775
07-08-2004, 10:47 AM
Actually the ball flies out better in cooler weather than hot, so hopefully it gets hot out
it does?? Cold air is much heavier than warm air. The less dense the air, the further the ball should fly, i thought.

DaveIsHere
07-08-2004, 10:49 AM
it does?? Cold air is much heavier than warm air. The less dense the air, the further the ball should fly, i thought.
Let me find the explanation on it, I just remember that it is the opposite of what I always thought it was..........I'll be back

Paulwny
07-08-2004, 10:49 AM
Actually the ball flies out better in cooler weather than hot, so hopefully it gets hot out
Time to bring this thread back:

http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=22212&highlight=effect+humidity+batted+ball

DaveIsHere
07-08-2004, 10:52 AM
Time to bring this thread back:

http://www.whitesoxinteractive.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=22212&highlight=effect+humidity+batted+ball
You are right, I was confused, I was thinking the opposite of the opposite from what I remebered, that makes sense...Thanks.:gulp: :rolleyes: :gulp: :gulp:

joeynach
07-08-2004, 10:53 AM
Actually the ball flies out better in cooler weather than hot, so hopefully it gets hot out
I dont think so. I have heard on numerous broadcasts that balls travel further in warm air than cold. Usually when the air is "juicy" they say the ball "carries" well. And that has nothing to do on prevailing wind direction. Do you remember that game in early June where the sox beat the Phillies 14-11. It was 92 degrees and humid. The ball was flying out of the park. And the wind was from the SSW to SW which at our park is from Right to Left.

Dadawg_77
07-08-2004, 10:55 AM
I dont think so. I have heard on numerous broadcasts that balls travel further in warm air than cold. Usually when the air is "juicy" they say the ball "carries" well. And that has nothing to do on prevailing wind direction. Do you remember that game in early June where the sox beat the Phillies 14-11. It was 92 degrees and humid. The ball was flying out of the park. And the wind was from the SSW to SW which at our park is from Right to Left.Let me give you a hint, what you hear from baseball announcers may or may not be true. Half the time announcers talk out of their asses just to fill time and make themselves look good.

But you are right some reason I thought you were saying balls travel in colder air then hotter air, I need sleep. The main reason for the ball carring better in heat is water vapor in the air.

DaveIsHere
07-08-2004, 10:56 AM
I dont think so. I have heard on numerous broadcasts that balls travel further in warm air than cold. Usually when the air is "juicy" they say the ball "carries" well. And that has nothing to do on prevailing wind direction. Do you remember that game in early June where the sox beat the Phillies 14-11. It was 92 degrees and humid. The ball was flying out of the park. And the wind was from the SSW to SW which at our park is from Right to Left.
See my post above this one, and the link that was provided, I am aware

Lip Man 1
07-08-2004, 01:48 PM
I was speaking with someone in the media who brought up that same point that since the Sox started tinkering with the outfield dimensions after the 2000 season the pitching staff has never been the same.

And he couldn't understand why the Sox did it, since their hitters were good enough to hit a number of home runs in 2000. His point was why hurt the pitching staff unnecessarily.

I don't know if moving the fences in had something to do with the rebuilding of the 'ballmall' but perhaps a different renovation plan could have been used to keep the same distances while simply taking out a few rows of bleacher seats to give you room for the modifications.

Lip

johnny_mostil
07-08-2004, 07:42 PM
I don't think I've seen this addressed at any length here, but if I just haven't been observant, apologies.

At any rate, I think we've all noticed the way that the ball has been flying out of the Cell since the park's upper deck was reconfigured in the off-season.
The ball has been flying out of the park since they brought in the fences several years ago. Comiskey/The Cell is a favorable home run park and has been for a long time.

Procol Harum
07-09-2004, 10:40 AM
The ball has been flying out of the park since they brought in the fences several years ago. Comiskey/The Cell is a favorable home run park and has been for a long time.
Agreed. But, the pace has been stoked this year, and the paticularly noticeable thing to me has been the increase in cheap, lofted fly ball homers that plop into the first 2-3 rows of the bleachers or topple just over the fence into the right field picnic section. Those are the ones that I think have been really influenced by the new aerodynamics in the park.