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gosox41
05-30-2004, 08:21 AM
Saw this article on ESPN.com and found it interesting with the draft coming up. I think it makes sense and though it doesn't mention Beane's name once, I know he is a big advocae of drafting college pitchers and not high school pitchers.




http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/columns/story?columnist=neyer_rob&id=1811682


Bob

batmanZoSo
05-30-2004, 09:52 AM
Originally posted by gosox41
Saw this article on ESPN.com and found it interesting with the draft coming up. I think it makes sense and though it doesn't mention Beane's name once, I know he is a big advocae of drafting college pitchers and not high school pitchers.




http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/columns/story?columnist=neyer_rob&id=1811682


Bob

It's good to draft some of both, but mostly college in my opinion. HSers are a gamble, but you can can an absolute gem with a low pick and a little luck. The two develop at different rates so it's good to draft both because you're more likely to always have someone down there who's "ready."

LittleBears Suck
05-30-2004, 10:17 AM
Not drafting a high school pitcher is a bad strategy. Not drafting a high school pitcher in the top ten rounds is a great strategy.

johnny_mostil
05-30-2004, 10:40 AM
Originally posted by LittleBears Suck
Not drafting a high school pitcher is a bad strategy. Not drafting a high school pitcher in the top ten rounds is a great strategy.

Beane's strategies are about reducing risk and maximizing short term returns. Nobody, including Billy Beane, ever said his way was better than spending money. The point is he built a perennial contender without spending a lot of money.

The A's don't spend first round draft picks on high school pitchers because their economic model requires that they have a steady supply of fresh young players. High school pitchers get hurt. If they could afford to hire free agents, they'd probably take a flyer on a high-ceiling high school prospect more often. They can't, so they don't.

The point behind Moneyball isn't that it's a better way for everybody. It's probably a better way if (1) you're flat broke and (2) don't play in a noncompetitive division.

gosox41
05-30-2004, 12:23 PM
Originally posted by johnny_mostil
Beane's strategies are about reducing risk and maximizing short term returns. Nobody, including Billy Beane, ever said his way was better than spending money. The point is he built a perennial contender without spending a lot of money.

The A's don't spend first round draft picks on high school pitchers because their economic model requires that they have a steady supply of fresh young players. High school pitchers get hurt. If they could afford to hire free agents, they'd probably take a flyer on a high-ceiling high school prospect more often. They can't, so they don't.

The point behind Moneyball isn't that it's a better way for everybody. It's probably a better way if (1) you're flat broke and (2) don't play in a noncompetitive division.

The A's certainly don't fall into category 2.

Another point of Beane is to correctly value assets. He knows that high school pitchers tend to get hurt a lot more and arent' worth the risk or the money.


Bob