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View Full Version : Takatsu's "Fast Ball"


StockdaleForVeep
05-24-2004, 02:48 AM
I just find it crazy and humerous(so did farmer and rooney) that shingo threw a clocked 50 mph changeup at todays game. I mean, how can someone willingly throw that slow? I know when im at pitch centres and games like the one in right field concourse i believe, if i throw hard enuff it may end up 50 mph and somewhere.

We're talking a pitch that my Geo might barely be able to outrun if going down a hill!

dirty-mutt
05-24-2004, 05:49 AM
whats even more interesting is that i believe that shingo struck somebody out with that 50 mph pitch

thats freakin awesome... as long as hes getting the outs i dont care what he throws

SSN721
05-24-2004, 06:18 AM
I hope this isnt a complaint about Takatsus ability. Ever since his first appearence in New York he has been nothing but lights out. And personally I love watching him pitch, I find it absolutely astounding how he is able to make the ball move.

DrummerGeorgefan
05-24-2004, 07:19 AM
The 50mph pitch or his other slower change ups are effective because hitters have trouble adjusting to seeing a ball come in at 85 then 65 then 79 then 50. Hitters will try to overswing at hit trying to crush it, or they are way out ahead of it. Its a great use of his abilities.

I wonder when he is going to break out the eephus

jabrch
05-24-2004, 08:51 AM
Good hitters always say it isn't speed of a fastball that gets them - but the difference in speed between a fastball and a change. Take a Randy Johnson who throws 98 and 85 and compare that to Takatsu's 50 and 85 - there is a 3X larger differential for Takatsu. That's awesome. How does a hitter brace himself for anything other than his "fastball"? They then have to adjust to the junk. If they expect the junk, they will NEVER catch up to the "heat"

joeynach
05-24-2004, 09:14 AM
Originally posted by jabrch
Good hitters always say it isn't speed of a fastball that gets them - but the difference in speed between a fastball and a change. Take a Randy Johnson who throws 98 and 85 and compare that to Takatsu's 50 and 85 - there is a 3X larger differential for Takatsu. That's awesome. How does a hitter brace himself for anything other than his "fastball"? They then have to adjust to the junk. If they expect the junk, they will NEVER catch up to the "heat"

I love it. Thats why he can get guys out, its called having good stuff. A 85 to 80 mph fastball with a 50 to 55 mph change wow. And all with the same arm and pitching motion. Thats why he is effective because he fools hitters.

batmanZoSo
05-24-2004, 09:35 AM
Originally posted by dirty-mutt
whats even more interesting is that i believe that shingo struck somebody out with that 50 mph pitch

thats freakin awesome... as long as hes getting the outs i dont care what he throws

I could just imagine the playoffs with him......."there it goes....and the Yankees are going to the World Series!" :smile:

Nard
05-24-2004, 11:26 AM
And once he gets his mind settled down he'll be one of the better relievers in the LEAGUE.

I found it funny that he went out there, threw four straight balls, then threw another ball to the next batter. Olivio went out to "talk" to him even though neither one of them understand what the other is saying, and then he retired three batters in a row without throwing a ball.

Paulwny
05-24-2004, 12:21 PM
Takatsu isn't alone. Orioles had a reliver, Stu Miller, early to mid 1960's who had 3 pitches, slow, slower and slowest. I don't remember who made this remark, a batter returning to the dugout said a pitch stopped half way to the plate.
He was a preety good reliever, hopefully Takatsu has the same success.

StockdaleForVeep
05-26-2004, 03:01 AM
Originally posted by SSN721
I hope this isnt a complaint about Takatsus ability. Ever since his first appearence in New York he has been nothing but lights out. And personally I love watching him pitch, I find it absolutely astounding how he is able to make the ball move.



No not complaining at all, hell i have liked every moment hes been on our team, for some reason i have a liking for the asian ball players and was one of those hoping the sox woulda got kaz matsui. Its funny how when he tanked in NY in his first apperance, everyone said kw was a moron for gettin this guy and he sucked. God i hate people who jump the gun

Then again, i was hopin and still hopin he would be the sox closer. He's got the career saves record in Japan and it proving to have the right stuff(era is in the mid 1 range now i believe) and nobody has seen him before with the exception of probbaly ichiro and hideki matsui. I have more faith in his 50 mph changeup than koch's supposed 92 mph fastball.

dirty-mutt
05-26-2004, 03:19 AM
Originally posted by batmanZoSo
I could just imagine the playoffs with him......."there it goes....and the Yankees are going to the World Series!" :smile:

bahaha

but seriously, shingo is the man... he knows how to pitch

ode to veeck
05-26-2004, 07:18 AM
It's absolutely the delta, i.e. the difference in speed between his fastball and changeup that makes it effective.

Foulke's another good example of this. His palm ball/changeup is most effective is when he's got enough velocity on his heater. When his mechanics were off a couple of springs ago and temporarily slowed his fastball a few MPH, he was getting lit up. In 2H'02 he readjusted his mechanics & got back his normal fastball & continued to be an effective closer since then.

DSpivack
05-26-2004, 11:38 AM
Originally posted by DrummerGeorgefan
The 50mph pitch or his other slower change ups are effective because hitters have trouble adjusting to seeing a ball come in at 85 then 65 then 79 then 50. Hitters will try to overswing at hit trying to crush it, or they are way out ahead of it. Its a great use of his abilities.

I wonder when he is going to break out the eephus

I've only seen that pitch on made-up guys in baseball video games. What is this pitch? Like a change-up screwball?

Nard
05-26-2004, 01:06 PM
The eephus is like a rainbow jumpshot. You throw the ball fifteen feet up in the air and it crosses the plate at like a 70-80 degree angle.

SpringfldFan
05-26-2004, 01:15 PM
Originally posted by Nard
The eephus is like a rainbow jumpshot. You throw the ball fifteen feet up in the air and it crosses the plate at like a 70-80 degree angle.

Exactly. It is another name for a lob. Hands down the most entertaining pitch in baseball. I believe the guy who brought the pitch to fame and coined the term "eephus" was Rip Sewell or something like that. In recent memory, the last guy I say throw it was Dave LaRoache, if my spelling is correct. IIRC he was a curve/junkballer and would throw loopy curveballs and on occasion would outdo himself and sneak in a lob or two. I don't think he got anywhere near as much arc as Sewell, though. Sewell's lobs were *way* up there.

Randar68
05-26-2004, 01:21 PM
Originally posted by SpringfldFan
Exactly. It is another name for a lob. Hands down the most entertaining pitch in baseball. I believe the guy who brought the pitch to fame and coined the term "eephus" was Rip Sewell or something like that. In recent memory, the last guy I say throw it was Dave LaRoache, if my spelling is correct. IIRC he was a curve/junkballer and would throw loopy curveballs and on occasion would outdo himself and sneak in a lob or two. I don't think he got anywhere near as much arc as Sewell, though. Sewell's lobs were *way* up there.

Partially correct. See the link for the history of the Eephus pitch.

History of the Eephus (http://www.thebaseballpage.com/features/2000/eephus.htm)

TaylorStSox
05-26-2004, 02:29 PM
Originally posted by SpringfldFan
Exactly. It is another name for a lob. Hands down the most entertaining pitch in baseball. I believe the guy who brought the pitch to fame and coined the term "eephus" was Rip Sewell or something like that. In recent memory, the last guy I say throw it was Dave LaRoache, if my spelling is correct. IIRC he was a curve/junkballer and would throw loopy curveballs and on occasion would outdo himself and sneak in a lob or two. I don't think he got anywhere near as much arc as Sewell, though. Sewell's lobs were *way* up there.

El Duke was doing it alot 2 years ago. The Yankees management wasn't impressed though.

StockdaleForVeep
05-26-2004, 03:24 PM
Originally posted by TaylorStSox
El Duke was doing it alot 2 years ago. The Yankees management wasn't impressed though.


When Mark McGwire was the "Bonds" of now and every pitcher avoided him like the plague, didnt some pitcher do that on him and actually got him out? I remember because i had a horrid flashback to the floater of rookie of the year.

DSpivack
05-26-2004, 04:42 PM
Man that pitch sounds entertaining. It'd be fun if a pitcher threw it; I doubt there any today, but who are some junkball-types who could pick it up?

patbooyah
05-26-2004, 06:34 PM
lets not forget folks, its not too late to join the shingo fan club. just mail me 25 bucks in a SASE. i'll return the envelope.

StockdaleForVeep
05-26-2004, 08:12 PM
Originally posted by patbooyah
lets not forget folks, its not too late to join the shingo fan club. just mail me 25 bucks in a SASE. i'll return the envelope.


My money will be in your hands as fast as his changeup takes to circle the globe. HA, i think i should start bringin my japanese flag to games now to support shingo(always have, can show it now without bein laughed at) Used to have it to support tajiri and others when ecw was still around.

BTW, come to think of it, i think the only pitch i can do is the Eephus and pretty much gopher ball where it ends up like 5 feet in the ground before the catcher.