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32nd&Wallace
05-09-2004, 06:30 PM
Anyone ever notice that JR never really fires people, rather they "resign" under weird circumstances. The list is long......Krause, Schuler, Rob Gallas, Paciorek. The only person I can remember him firing was Larry Himes. Even stranger is how when these people are fired, they claim they want to get away but yet a year later you see them schucking for a job in the industry. Krause said he retired for health reasons, but he later said he would take another general manager job elsewhere. Also, I'd like to know the real reason Paciorek left because his departure also came at an odd time with no real forewarning.

jackbrohamer
05-09-2004, 07:00 PM
IIRC around the time they fired Jeff Torborg after 1991 Sox management said he wanted to be let go so he could try to get a job in NY closer to his ailing mother. Torborg denied it. I assume the Sox were lying. But Torborg did wind up in NY the next year

JohnBasedowYoda
05-09-2004, 08:50 PM
i betcha black helicopters and secret service agents visit those guys until they resign

PaleHoseGeorge
05-09-2004, 09:31 PM
Originally posted by jackbrohamer
IIRC around the time they fired Jeff Torborg after 1991 Sox management said he wanted to be let go so he could try to get a job in NY closer to his ailing mother. Torborg denied it. I assume the Sox were lying. But Torborg did wind up in NY the next year

The Torborg situation was an interesting one because the details didn't come out for over a year after he left. He had completed his third season as Sox manager and the Mets job came open. Schueler calls him and says, "Good news! The Mets want to talk to you."

Torborg had suffered through the '89 season, knew the team was moving in the right direction and replied something to the effect "I'm not interested. I was here for the rough stuff and I'm looking forward to all the good stuff to come."

And Schueler's reply was, "Well, maybe you ought to talk to them..." As Torborg tells it, he took the hint. Of course the cover story in 1991-92 was that Jeff left for the Mets job because he simply wanted to go home to New Jersey.

Does this sound strangely familiar? It's the same exit story (later proven false) about Tom Paciorek, too.

One of the Chicago sports reporters did a follow up interview with Torborg in camp the following year. Other details came later.

Lip Man 1
05-09-2004, 09:51 PM
This is a small listing of comments from a future story:

On his loyalty: “.He goes up to Rod (Thorn’s) office, Jerry came back downstairs and he was ashen-faced. The man was white. I looked at him and said ‘what’s wrong with you?’ He said, ‘you know in all my years at Balcor I only fired one person. That’s only the second person I’ve fired in my life. I don’t like firing people.’ And I thought, ‘Gee, that’s a great sign. Here’s an owner who doesn’t want to fire anybody.” –Jerry Krause to Roland Lazenby. From the book And Now, Your Chicago Bulls! Pg. 144.

“When I retired, Jerry said, ‘I’ll take care of you. I owe you.’ But he paid me back when he brought me to Birmingham.”–Michael Jordan to Melissa Isaacson. From the book Transition Game. Pg. 11.

“I just wanted to give him a bonus that’s all. I never thought he (Michael Jordan) was coming back.” – Jerry Reinsdorf to Roland Lazenby. From the book Blood On The Horns. Pg. 68.

“Reinsdorf believed (Phil) Jackson was being disloyal by even thinking about leaving the team and loyalty is a trait most respected by Reinsdorf.”– Sam Smith. From the book Second Coming. Pg. 344.

Lip

batmanZoSo
05-09-2004, 09:51 PM
Originally posted by PaleHoseGeorge
The Torborg situation was an interesting one because the details didn't come out for over a year after he left. He had completed his third season as Sox manager and the Mets job came open. Schueler calls him and says, "Good news! The Mets want to talk to you."

Torborg had suffered through the '89 season, knew the team was moving in the right direction and replied something to the effect "I'm not interested. I was here for the rough stuff and I'm looking forward to all the good stuff to come."

And Schueler's reply was, "Well, maybe you ought to talk to them..." As Torborg tells it, he took the hint. Of course the cover story in 1991-92 was that Jeff left for the Mets job because he simply wanted to go home to New Jersey.

Does this sound strangely familiar? It's the same exit story (later proven false) about Tom Paciorek, too.

One of the Chicago sports reporters did a follow up interview with Torborg in camp the following year. Other details came later.

Why was Torborg fired anyway? I was young then, but it seems to me that all he did was win from 90-92.

TornLabrum
05-09-2004, 10:13 PM
Originally posted by batmanZoSo
Why was Torborg fired anyway? I was young then, but it seems to me that all he did was win from 90-92.

The main reason is that he was hired by Larry Himes and Schueler wanted his own man in.

batmanZoSo
05-09-2004, 10:29 PM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
The main reason is that he was hired by Larry Himes and Schueler wanted his own man in.

Sounds like a good reason. It's probably due to practices like this that we regularly win championships.

TornLabrum
05-09-2004, 10:32 PM
Originally posted by batmanZoSo
Sounds like a good reason. It's probably due to practices like this that we regularly win championships.

It IS common practice, though. I mean, all you have to do to confirm that is take a look at what Jerry Angelo did to Dick Jauron before the 2003 NFL season.

batmanZoSo
05-09-2004, 10:37 PM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
It IS common practice, though. I mean, all you have to do to confirm that is take a look at what Jerry Angelo did to Dick Jauron before the 2003 NFL season.

Yeah, and one constant here: neither the Bears nor the Sox win anything. :smile:

Dadawg_77
05-09-2004, 10:53 PM
He also isn't that great of a manager.

batmanZoSo
05-09-2004, 10:55 PM
Originally posted by Dadawg_77
He also isn't that great of a manager.

Was he so bad that they had to make way for the great Gene Lamont?

jabrch
05-10-2004, 12:06 PM
Steinbrenner is notorious for that trait also. He has his people that he flips around the organization, but rarely does he fire them. Lots of guys on "special assignment" for a few years here and there. Billy Martin was "fired" many times, but usually fired in name only - in the 80s, he was moved to some other post somewhere in the system a few times before finally passing away.

ewokpelts
05-10-2004, 12:49 PM
Originally posted by jabrch
Steinbrenner is notorious for that trait also. He has his people that he flips around the organization, but rarely does he fire them. Lots of guys on "special assignment" for a few years here and there. Billy Martin was "fired" many times, but usually fired in name only - in the 80s, he was moved to some other post somewhere in the system a few times before finally passing away.

Well george fired him so much they even joked about it. They even did a press confrence where billy got "fired" in fron of the press and then laughed it off.
Gene

Medford Bobby
05-10-2004, 12:56 PM
Boy thats true of Torberg not being a great manager....something was not right there in Miami when the Marlins fired him and brought in Jack McKeon. Would Torberg led those guys to a World Series. That's why I wonder if Ozzie picked up that change in course and a change in manager suddenly gave them a World Series bound franchise. :angry: