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blueeyes33
04-28-2004, 07:16 PM
arnt those all sox players on the outfield wall?

why is j robinson up there?i didnt think he played on the sox

Unregistered
04-28-2004, 07:21 PM
It's tributes of all the retired numbers on the Sox. Since Robinson's number is retired throughout the MLB (obviously including the Sox as well), he makes the cut, I guess.

blueeyes33
04-28-2004, 07:25 PM
JR should have a picture of himself up there.it would make as much sense.

wolcott10
04-28-2004, 07:33 PM
Originally posted by Unregistered
It's tributes of all the retired numbers on the Sox. Since Robinson's number is retired throughout the MLB (obviously including the Sox as well), he makes the cut, I guess.

Doesn't the Yankees' Mariano Rivera wear #42?

A.T. Money
04-28-2004, 07:43 PM
Originally posted by wolcott10
Doesn't the Yankees' Mariano Rivera wear #42?

Yeah he does. But I think that's because he was grandfathered in. If he changed teams, he'd lose it. And 42 would no longer be available to the Yankees anymore.

RichFitztightly
04-28-2004, 09:56 PM
Originally posted by wolcott10
Doesn't the Yankees' Mariano Rivera wear #42?

Yeah, he did get grandfathered in. Mo Vaughn is the only other person to wear 42. Though I think he's out of the game so just Rivera is left.

iwannago
04-28-2004, 09:59 PM
Robinson's number should only be retired in LA. Each team should have there own individual retired numbers

WinningUgly!
04-28-2004, 10:06 PM
Originally posted by A.T. Money
Yeah he does. But I think that's because he was grandfathered in. If he changed teams, he'd lose it. And 42 would no longer be available to the Yankees anymore.

Rivera would still be allowed to wear #42 if he went to another team. Mo Vaughn still wears it. He was with Boston in 1997, when MLB retired #42 in honor of Jackie Robinson. Since then he's also worn #42 as a member of the Angels & Mets.

Max Power
04-28-2004, 10:11 PM
Originally posted by iwannago
Robinson's number should only be retired in LA. Each team should have there own individual retired numbers

It would be psychologically impossible for me to admire and respect Jackie Robinson anymore than I do. That being said, I agree with this statement. Jackie was a Dodger, leave it at that. The Sox (and every other team) have plenty of retired players to be proud of.

TornLabrum
04-28-2004, 11:34 PM
Originally posted by Max Power
It would be psychologically impossible for me to admire and respect Jackie Robinson anymore than I do. That being said, I agree with this statement. Jackie was a Dodger, leave it at that. The Sox (and every other team) have plenty of retired players to be proud of.

And I'd go the other way. I think every team in MLB should also honor Larry Doby, who put up with every bit as much **** as Robinson did.

And BTW, to those of you who don't think every team in baseball should so honor Robinson, just consider it reparations for all of the abuse he was forced to submit to without retaliating. It's a whole lot less than he deserves. Sadly, Doby has received no such honor.

ScottyTheSoxFan
04-28-2004, 11:50 PM
Originally posted by WinningUgly!
Rivera would still be allowed to wear #42 if he went to another team. Mo Vaughn still wears it. He was with Boston in 1997, when MLB retired #42 in honor of Jackie Robinson. Since then he's also worn #42 as a member of the Angels & Mets.

Our own Mike Jackson is eligible to wear 42 as well, however he doesn't.

Rex Hudler
04-29-2004, 12:50 AM
Trivia question........... Who was the first black pitcher in the Major Leagues?

batmanZoSo
04-29-2004, 12:55 AM
Originally posted by Rex Hudler
Trivia question........... Who was the first black pitcher in the Major Leagues?

James Baldwin?

Unregistered
04-29-2004, 12:56 AM
Originally posted by Rex Hudler
Trivia question........... Who was the first black pitcher in the Major Leagues? The first black pitcher in big-league history was Brooklyn’s Dan Bankhead in 1947. THEN came Baldwin. :D:

beckett21
04-29-2004, 12:58 AM
Originally posted by batmanZoSo
James Baldwin?

I believe the question was FIRST, not WORST...

:)

Unregistered
04-29-2004, 12:58 AM
Originally posted by Unregistered
The first black pitcher in big-league history was Brooklyn’s Dan Bankhead in 1947. THEN came Baldwin. :D: btw, big ups to Google. :gulp:

ChiWhiteSox1337
04-29-2004, 01:08 AM
Originally posted by Unregistered
btw, big ups to Google. :gulp:
you beat me to it. :whiner:

batmanZoSo
04-29-2004, 01:32 AM
Originally posted by Unregistered
btw, big ups to Google. :gulp:

Baldwin was a bit of a bankhead himself, just give it to him (yeah, I don't know what bankhead is supposed to mean either, work with me here) :smile:

TDog
04-29-2004, 02:05 AM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
And I'd go the other way. I think every team in MLB should also honor Larry Doby, who put up with every bit as much **** as Robinson did.

Bob Feller, who is a bitter old man, has said Larry Doby had it easier than Jackie Robinson because the Indians treated him like he was part of the Indians gang. Larry Doby when asked to respond, didn't know what team Feller was talking about.

Railsplitter
04-29-2004, 09:05 AM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
And I'd go the other way. I think every team in MLB should also honor Larry Doby, who put up with every bit as much **** as Robinson did.

And BTW, to those of you who don't think every team in baseball should so honor Robinson, just consider it reparations for all of the abuse he was forced to submit to without retaliating. It's a whole lot less than he deserves. Sadly, Doby has received no such honor.

Robinson played in New York, Doby in Cleveland. I've often wodered if it would have been such a big Deal if doby had been the first in Ceveland. Most people are unaware that the first team with TWO plack players were the St. Louis Browns, but how many people have heard of Hank Thompson and Willard Brown? Hey, I had to bring my copy of the Sporting News Baseball Trivia Book to the computer just to give you those two names.

Dadawg_77
04-29-2004, 10:01 AM
It was consider scandalous when Veck thought about putting together an all black team.

Jackie deserves all the recognition he receives and more. 42 should not only be retired because of Jackie but also as an apology for Baseball past.

Iwritecode
04-29-2004, 11:05 AM
Speaking of trivia questions, who was the first black player in MLB?

IIRC, there was a player before Robinson but I can't remember his name.

I rememember this being mentioned in the movie "Little Big League". (the one where the kid inherits the Twins)

TommyJohn
04-29-2004, 12:33 PM
Originally posted by Railsplitter
Robinson played in New York, Doby in Cleveland. I've often wodered if it would have been such a big Deal if doby had been the first in Ceveland. Most people are unaware that the first team with TWO plack players were the St. Louis Browns, but how many people have heard of Hank Thompson and Willard Brown? Hey, I had to bring my copy of the Sporting News Baseball Trivia Book to the computer just to give you those two names.

Hank Thompson is Jackie Robinson squared. He integrated two
MLB teams, the Browns and the New York Giants. That is an
accomplishment that will obviously never be topped.

TommyJohn
04-29-2004, 12:35 PM
Originally posted by TDog
Bob Feller, who is a bitter old man, has said Larry Doby had it easier than Jackie Robinson because the Indians treated him like he was part of the Indians gang. Larry Doby when asked to respond, didn't know what team Feller was talking about.

Minnie Minoso, in an interview with Bob Vanderberg, says he
never experienced any abuse from players or fans when he
joined the White Sox.

TDog
04-29-2004, 01:09 PM
Originally posted by Iwritecode
Speaking of trivia questions, who was the first black player in MLB?

IIRC, there was a player before Robinson but I can't remember his name.

Moses Fleetwood Walker. I have forgotten the year and don't have the time to look it up, but he was a catcher for Toledo in the American Association when it was classed as a major league in the 19th century. His brother Wendell Wilburforce Walker (I may have misspelled his first name) was the second black player in the league. If there were any more before Jackie Robinson, they successfully passed as white and kept their secret beyond the grave.

Cap Anson led the successful drive to keep baseball white in those early years. Just part of the feel-good Cubbie heritage.

VeeckAsInWreck
04-29-2004, 04:32 PM
Originally posted by Dadawg_77
It was consider scandalous when Veck thought about putting together an all black team.

It would have been great. Veeck wanted to buy the Phillies in 1943 and set up two separate ST camps. One for the "white" Phillies and another for the "black" Phillies. Then, when opening day came he was going to send the black Phillies to take the field. However, MLB heard about the plan and nixed the sale of the Phillies to Veeck.

Think about how great that would have been and how bad the MLB would have looked to not allow the game.

Rex Hudler
04-29-2004, 09:21 PM
Originally posted by Unregistered....
The first black pitcher in big-league history was Brooklyn’s Dan Bankhead in 1947. THEN came Baldwin.

Good work. Bankhead was a former member of the Birmingham Black Barons, signed out of the old Industrial Leagues.

Railsplitter
04-29-2004, 10:52 PM
Originally posted by TDog
Moses Fleetwood Walker. I have forgotten the year and don't have the time to look it up, but he was a catcher for Toledo in the American Association when it was classed as a major league in the 19th century. His brother Wendell Wilburforce Walker (I may have misspelled his first name) was the second black player in the league. If there were any more before Jackie Robinson, they successfully passed as white and kept their secret beyond the grave.

Cap Anson led the successful drive to keep baseball white in those early years. Just part of the feel-good Cubbie heritage.

1884, I believe, and I'm think "Fleetwood" may have been a nickname, not a middle name.

TommyJohn
04-30-2004, 12:00 AM
Originally posted by TDog
Moses Fleetwood Walker. I have forgotten the year and don't have the time to look it up, but he was a catcher for Toledo in the American Association when it was classed as a major league in the 19th century. His brother Wendell Wilburforce Walker (I may have misspelled his first name) was the second black player in the league. If there were any more before Jackie Robinson, they successfully passed as white and kept their secret beyond the grave.

I remember speaking with a gentleman named Rich Topp, who
belonged to SABR. He used to research what happened to ball-
players once their careers were over. He said that he found at
least seven black players before Jackie Robinson who were
light enough to "pass" as white or Hispanic. Of course, Jackie
Robinson deserves the credit that he gets for being the first,
because he had no barrier to hide behind.

TornLabrum
04-30-2004, 12:20 AM
Originally posted by Railsplitter
1884, I believe, and I'm think "Fleetwood" may have been a nickname, not a middle name.

Fleetwood was his middle name. His nickname was "Fleet.'

Also, his brother's name was Welday.

nasox
04-30-2004, 01:01 AM
who was the last team to integrate? I'm just wondering...

Unregistered
04-30-2004, 01:02 AM
Originally posted by nasox
who was the last team to integrate? I'm just wondering... The Diamondbacks?

TommyJohn
04-30-2004, 01:20 AM
Originally posted by nasox
who was the last team to integrate? I'm just wondering...

The Boston Red Sox in 1959, with Elijah "Pumpsie" Green, who
made his debut in Comiskey Park against the Go-Go Sox.

Incidentally, the Red Sox were anti-integration hard-liners and
resisted all efforts to get them to do so. Green came on board
only after enormous pressure from the NAACP and many fans.