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View Full Version : Website for future development of land on 35th street


rdivaldi
04-22-2004, 02:23 PM
As I was driving down State Street last night, I noticed an advertisement for the future homes to be built on the land where Stateway Gardens once stood. I've always been interested in real estate, and have been anxiously awaiting the plans for the area east of the ballpark.

Well, looking at this site it appears as though there is going to be a very nice neighborhood going up. No ugly highrises and plenty of green (grass that is).

I don't know about you guys, but this really excites me as a south side resident and a Sox fan. Heck, maybe I could move there in a couple of years, the prices are definitely affordable. Anyway here is the website, I recommend everyone take a look as this will impact the ballclub significantly.

Changing the face of the south side (http://www.parkboulevardchicago.com)

Fridaythe13thJason
04-22-2004, 02:26 PM
If you've seen what they've done with the area south of UIC to the Metra tracks, you would be impressed. It's that kind of development that is going to create neighborhoods where they never existed before.

rdivaldi
04-22-2004, 02:30 PM
It just blows my mind driving down State Street nowadays. I can just remember that awful wall of projects lining it. It's almost unbelievable that area is going to be turned into a quality middle class neighborhood. Then again, where I currently live used to be a pretty scary area as well.

I'm pretty proud of the job our fair city has done cleaning up the mess on the south side.

Fridaythe13thJason
04-22-2004, 02:31 PM
Originally posted by rdivaldi
It just blows my mind driving down State Street nowadays. I can just remember that awful wall of projects lining it. It's almost unbelievable that area is going to be turned into a quality middle class neighborhood. Then again, where I currently live used to be a pretty scary area as well.

I'm pretty proud of the job our fair city has done cleaning up the mess on the south side.

Some people call it gentrification and think its terrible. I think its somewhere in teh middle of admirable and detestable...but certainly more towards admirable.

rdivaldi
04-22-2004, 02:36 PM
I hate the word gentrification. People associate that word with white people running the minorities out of the area, and there's absolutely no truth to that. In my neighborhood I'd say 40% are black, 40% are Asian, and 20% are white. The Near South and South Loop is extremely diverse and safe. As for the true meaning of the word "gentrification", there are plenty of low income housing options, so the lower class are not being run out of the area, there are just less of them. They are also safer and have better housing.

DrummerGeorgefan
04-22-2004, 02:47 PM
I think its a good thing. The area around UIC-University Commons or whatever its called looks great.

People forget that living in Bridgeport, Pilsen is as close to living to downtown as Lincoln Park or Wrigleyville.

Maybe WSI should plan a commune

jackbrohamer
04-22-2004, 02:50 PM
There is a development of townhouses north of 35th Street, west of the park, by the old Spiegel Catalog building, that I'm told are selling for $2 million. Who knows how long the development south of the loop will continue, but so far it's good news for Sox attendance in the future

Fridaythe13thJason
04-22-2004, 02:50 PM
Originally posted by DrummerGeorgefan
I think its a good thing. The area around UIC-University Commons or whatever its called looks great.

People forget that living in Bridgeport, Pilsen is as close to living to downtown as Lincoln Park or Wrigleyville.

Maybe WSI should plan a commune

That's a great point...I would love it if I were attracted to live south of the loop. I could live much closer. It's weird that the city didn't turn out that way so far...that the ring outside the downtown is the nicest, etc.

BeerHandle
04-22-2004, 02:52 PM
University Village is a lot different then Stateway Gardens.

University Village is high end and very nice (extension of the West Loop)

Stateway Gardens will be a mix of incomes. It will be the same that they did around Cabrini Green on Halsted and Division. A certain percentage of the homes have to be for Section 8.

I do prefer it then the high rise and will only make the area much nicer. There is a lot of area to develop.

rdivaldi
04-22-2004, 02:59 PM
Originally posted by BeerHandle
Stateway Gardens will be a mix of incomes. It will be the same that they did around Cabrini Green on Halsted and Division. A certain percentage of the homes have to be for Section 8.

I do prefer it then the high rise and will only make the area much nicer. There is a lot of area to develop.

I think this is a good thing, after living in extremely homogenous Lincoln Park for so long, I greatly appreciate the diversity of the near south side.

The mixed income housing model has been a success in Cabrini as far as I can tell. Hopefully the good run will continue in the Park Boulevard neighborhood.

rdivaldi
04-22-2004, 03:01 PM
Originally posted by UICJason
That's a great point...I would love it if I were attracted to live south of the loop. I could live much closer. It's weird that the city didn't turn out that way so far...that the ring outside the downtown is the nicest, etc.

What's keeping you from living in the near south side? My wife and I moved into a nice home on 18th street and we love it. The south side keeps growing (and getting more expensive)

Brian26
04-22-2004, 03:01 PM
Originally posted by UICJason
If you've seen what they've done with the area south of UIC to the Metra tracks, you would be impressed. It's that kind of development that is going to create neighborhoods where they never existed before.

University Village is a nice development down there. I'm amazed at how big it is.

rdivaldi
04-22-2004, 03:05 PM
Originally posted by Brian26
University Village is a nice development down there. I'm amazed at how big it is.

Actually I was more amazed at how expensive it was from the get go. I took one visit to the sales center 2 years ago and was floored by the prices. But yeah, it looks awesome and they are converting all the old warehouses into lofts behind it.

voodoochile
04-22-2004, 03:13 PM
Originally posted by UICJason
Some people call it gentrification and think its terrible. I think its somewhere in teh middle of admirable and detestable...but certainly more towards admirable.

Woah, don't go out on a limb now... :D:

This is a good idea. If they follow the plan from the old Cabrini neighborhood, the buildings will be mixed use to start and slowly work their way toward families and middle class folks.

JR must have Little Ritchie's ear and it explains why he hasn't sold yet. He is waiting for the gentrification to finish which will up the value of the club by millions of dollars.

Expect the Sox to go even more for the family atmosphere in the next few years and watch attendance climb, especially if Wrigley continues to have a bunch of idiots doing stupid things on a regular basis.

BeerHandle
04-22-2004, 03:16 PM
My friend just bought in University Village and paid the same price as she did in the West loop. The difference was that she went from 1,300 square feet to a 2,100 square foot condo.

doublem23
04-22-2004, 03:17 PM
Sweet... All I can hope is that I still catch the front end of this redevelopment by the time I move back to Chicago. I'd love to wind up in Soxville.

Brian26
04-22-2004, 03:19 PM
Originally posted by BeerHandle
My friend just bought in University Village and paid the same price as she did in the West loop. The difference was that she went from 1,300 square feet to a 2,100 square foot condo.

A lot of people got screwed over there as far as time. I knew a guy who put money down on a unit in mid 2000 and didn't get in there until Spring of 2003. There were a ton of delays.

rdivaldi
04-22-2004, 03:24 PM
Originally posted by BeerHandle
My friend just bought in University Village and paid the same price as she did in the West loop. The difference was that she went from 1,300 square feet to a 2,100 square foot condo.

Yeah, the West Loop appreciated at an insane clip during the last couple of years. We have friends who paid almost $200K more than we did for a similarly sized townhome.

A.T. Money
04-22-2004, 03:28 PM
I would love to live near Sox park. I just don't know if my girlfriend would go for it considering that she would rather live in a suburb.

I say that we should live there a couple years, let it all appreciate, then sell when we're ready to have kids and run with the money.

rdivaldi
04-22-2004, 03:28 PM
Originally posted by doublem23
Sweet... All I can hope is that I still catch the front end of this redevelopment by the time I move back to Chicago. I'd love to wind up in Soxville.

Soxville, LOL

Anyway, looking at the current prices for that development, I wouldn't be surprised for the prices to almost double in 5-6 years if the neighborhood sells well and attracts a lot of middle class and upper middle class families.

Fridaythe13thJason
04-22-2004, 03:45 PM
Originally posted by rdivaldi
What's keeping you from living in the near south side? My wife and I moved into a nice home on 18th street and we love it. The south side keeps growing (and getting more expensive)

Nothing is preventing it. I just don't want to. All of my friends are northsiders...all of my social spots...everything. My parents live in the north suburbs. I'm just saying I wish it were different so more of my friends or things like that would just be there, then I could as well.

For now, I was born and raised up here, and not much will change that I'm sure,.

HomeFish
04-22-2004, 04:03 PM
1995: Waah! The area around Comiskey Park is horrible. There's no bars, just housing projects and people committing crime and doing drugs! It's just so unsafe.

2015: Waah! The area around US Cellular Field is horrible. There's no bars, just middle-class housing and people riding bikes and walking dogs! It's just so boring.

rdivaldi
04-22-2004, 04:07 PM
Originally posted by UICJason
Nothing is preventing it. I just don't want to. All of my friends are northsiders...all of my social spots...everything. My parents live in the north suburbs. I'm just saying I wish it were different so more of my friends or things like that would just be there, then I could as well.

For now, I was born and raised up here, and not much will change that I'm sure,.

Ah, I gotcha. I couldn't leave the north side fast enough after I tired of the social scene. Most of my friends scattered around the West Loop after they got a little older as well. I don't have a problem driving 10-15 minutes to their pads, but it would be much better if we lived in the same neighborhood.

Personally, I've come to prefer the south side restaurants over the north side (the best restaurants are in the loop). While the bar scene pretty much doesn't interest me anymore, clubs need to be built on the south side as there is a definite lack of them.

All in due time I suppose.

34 Inch Stick
04-22-2004, 04:55 PM
Originally posted by rdivaldi
Soxville, LOL

Anyway, looking at the current prices for that development, I wouldn't be surprised for the prices to almost double in 5-6 years if the neighborhood sells well and attracts a lot of middle class and upper middle class families.

Reinsdorfville. He'd run it like Mr. Potter.

DSpivack
04-22-2004, 10:21 PM
Originally posted by HomeFish

1995: Waah! The area around Comiskey Park is horrible. There's no bars, just housing projects and people committing crime and doing drugs! It's just so unsafe.

2015: Waah! The area around US Cellular Field is horrible. There's no bars, just middle-class housing and people riding bikes and walking dogs! It's just so boring.


LMAO. And in 2035?

Originally posted by rdivaldi

Personally, I've come to prefer the south side restaurants over the north side (the best restaurants are in the loop). While the bar scene pretty much doesn't interest me anymore, clubs need to be built on the south side as there is a definite lack of them.

All in due time I suppose.

Well, I don't know the South Side well, but the best restaurants are all over the city. Indian=Devon=Far North Side. Chinese=Chinatown. Other Asian=Argyle. Mexican=18th/27th. Greek=Greektown. Italian=Taylor or Oakley. Pizza= Mostly downtown/ near north/near south side. Hot dogs= anywhere

Then again, many of those are either South Side or near South Side. Nevermind?

TaylorStSox
04-22-2004, 10:26 PM
Originally posted by DSpivack
LMAO. And in 2035?



Well, I don't know the South Side well, but the best restaurants are all over the city. Indian=Devon=Far North Side. Chinese=Chinatown. Other Asian=Argyle. Mexican=18th/27th. Greek=Greektown. Italian=Taylor or Oakley. Pizza= Mostly downtown/ near north/near south side. Hot dogs= anywhere

Then again, many of those are either South Side or near South Side. Nevermind?

MJL_Sox_Fan
04-22-2004, 11:02 PM
I work in real estate, particularly affordable housing and the building east of the Park is part of the CHA's Plan for Transformation, just as Cabrini is. The development will be mixed income and will contain for sale and rental units. Portions of the for-sale units will be sold at prices for low and moderate income buyers. The rental units will be mostly CHA subsidized units, ie Section 8 vouchers. Additional development is occuring in many areas east of the Park. See the development along the IC tracks called Lake Park Crescent and on Drexel Blvd called Jazz on the Boulevard. The CHA website has more information on each development. Each may have a website as well, try Draper and Kramer's website or the website for Thrush. They are doing much of the development work.

As for what will become of the area, the CHA's Plan for Transformation is ambitious and risky. There is no guarantee that the Southside and Westside (Horner Homes) area under development will turn out like Cabrini. It was pretty much a slamdunk at Cabrini given the area surrounding it. Also, there has much made about the reloction of the former residents and whether there will be enough subsidized units for these residents to return to their neighborhoods. As of right now, many have been displaced into very low income areas and many into the south suburbs.