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View Full Version : South Side Hitmen VS The 2004 White Sox (Yet to be named)


White_Sock
04-16-2004, 04:58 AM
I've heard from the old-timers how exciting the 1977 South Side Hitmen were because they were aggressive offensively.

Well the 2004 White Sox have been knocking the crap out of the ball and it's the most excited I've ever been for the start of the season. Watching this team is just a gas so far. With that said:

2004 SOX vs. 1977 SOX

comparisons anyone?

starboy0
04-16-2004, 06:59 AM
That '77 team had a lot of guys with double digit homerun totals. A typical game score would be 9-8 Sox. Tons of offensive punch and surprises. And you could tell they were enjoying the game and played their hearts out.

If only the pitching had been more consistent.

The present team has similar offensive fire power but better pitching and now it looks like they're getting fired up. Plus in '77 KC and Texas were really tough while this year the division rivals don't seem so menacing.

I believe things could fall our way this year.

Railsplitter
04-16-2004, 08:45 AM
Originally posted by starboy0


If only the pitching had been more consistent.



How true. Wilbur Wood, the sox' best pitcher in the first half of the 70's had his kneecap shattered by a line drive in 1976 and was never the same pitcher after that. What a shame and what a loss.

tebman
04-16-2004, 10:37 AM
Originally posted by White_Sock
I've heard from the old-timers how exciting the 1977 South Side Hitmen were because they were aggressive offensively.

Well the 2004 White Sox have been knocking the crap out of the ball and it's the most excited I've ever been for the start of the season. Watching this team is just a gas so far. With that said:

2004 SOX vs. 1977 SOX

comparisons anyone?

I was there! :D:

We're only a week into this season, so it's way too early to make
any real comparisons. But the potential is there, because in '77
the Sox were not expected by anybody (including themselves) to do anything.
The team was cobbled together by Veeck and Hemond as a result
of tight-budget acquisitions and questionable trades. The pitching
was shaky, the fielding was marginal and the team was mostly
a collection of "who's he?" players.

But '77 went on to be a magical year because of a combination of
factors: a completely unexpected batting explosion, a whole set
of feel-good stories (Sodeholm, Spencer, Lemon, Stone, etc.) on
the team, and the comeuppance of the haughty Royals and
Yankees, who reacted to the Sox as if they'd been bit by an
annoying dog. Veeck fueled the fire, of course, but it was one
of those situations where everything (the team's performance,
the demographics of the fans, Harry & Jimmy on TV and radio,
Nancy Faust, etc.) came together at the right time.

Could this year be like that year? Maybe, if the Ozzieball phenomenon
is genuine and the players truly do have a good time. If the Sox
have a winning season AND have a lot of laughs, that will be what
would make 2004 like 1977.

- tebman

Irishsox1
04-16-2004, 11:10 AM
Lets stop naming every team that is decent. It's really lame. No more catch phrase names for the Sox unless it is "World Series Champions."

JohnBasedowYoda
04-16-2004, 11:14 AM
Future World Series Champs? or how about The Sheezies

TDog
04-16-2004, 12:45 PM
The 1977 Sox were out of control. They were fun to watch, especially after the 1976 version of corpseball. They could spot the Yankees 7 in the top of the first and come back with 7 of their own in the bottom half.

But as one veteran baseball columnist pointed out, their baserunning was like something out of the Middle Ages, when people didn't have baseball and just ran around through woods and pastures. In one one-run loss, where both teams scored in double-digits, Ralph Garr had what would have been a home run in Minnesota, if he hadn't passed the runner who had been on first base.

The 7 1/2-game lead the Sox had in July mostly disappeared in the early August heat of Texas. By September, the hitters were so tired that the team was shutout twice on their way to finishing 13 games behind KC.

Chicago isn't the only city where baseball fans celebrate "great seasons" where their teams didn't finish first. But in Miami and Anaheim, such teams have World Series championships as consolation.