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DannyCaterFan
04-14-2004, 10:55 PM
This may be a rather silly question, but still it has been nagging at me all day. In todays win over the Royals, shouldn't the final score have been 11-9? Joe Crede's ninth inning hit actually bounced over the fence on one hop and should have been ruled a ground rule double. With the bases loaded that would have forced two runs home and Crede would have been credited with an additional RBI. if he had hit the ball out of the park it would have been a grand slam and 4 RBI's. What's the difference here?

voodoochile
04-14-2004, 10:58 PM
Originally posted by DannyCaterFan
This may be a rather silly question, but still it has been nagging at me all day. In todays win over the Royals, shouldn't the final score have been 11-9? Joe Crede's ninth inning hit actually bounced over the fence on one hop and should have been ruled a ground rule double. With the bases loaded that would have forced two runs home and Crede would have been credited with an additional RBI. if he had hit the ball out of the park it would have been a grand slam and 4 RBI's. What's the difference here?

I don't think the guy on second ever touched home and thus technically would be ruled out for a basepath violation. You have to touch the plate for the run to score. It cannot be done electronically.

HomeFish
04-14-2004, 11:00 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
I don't think the guy on second ever touched home and thus technically would be ruled out for a basepath violation. You have to touch the plate for the run to score. It cannot be done electronically.

How does that work? If somebody were to hit a homerun and somehow miss home plate on their way in, how long would they have to go back and touch it?

Moreover, say somebody hits a home run and trips and kills himself over second base. Could the manager put in a pinch hitter to continue to home plate for the batter?

Nick@Nite
04-14-2004, 11:01 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
I don't think the guy on second ever touched home and thus technically would be ruled out for a basepath violation. You have to touch the plate for the run to score. It cannot be done electronically.

... costing Crede an rbi.

Dadawg_77
04-14-2004, 11:04 PM
Originally posted by HomeFish
How does that work? If somebody were to hit a homerun and somehow miss home plate on their way in, how long would they have to go back and touch it?

Moreover, say somebody hits a home run and trips and kills himself over second base. Could the manager put in a pinch hitter to continue to home plate for the batter?

Either when they are touched or leave the field of play.

TornLabrum
04-14-2004, 11:04 PM
The rule is basically this:

When a hit causes the winning run to score, the game is over as soon as the winning run touches the plate, and the batter is given credit for as many bases as is necessary for the winning run to score. In this case, Harris was on third, so only a single was necessary for the run to cross the plate. Crede gets credit for a single and one RBI.

The only exception to this rule, and this was not even instituted until about 1920 is the walk off homer. In that case, since the defense can't do anything about it to prevent it, the batter is given credit for the HR and as many RBI as would score if the homer did not end the game.

voodoochile
04-14-2004, 11:08 PM
Originally posted by HomeFish
How does that work? If somebody were to hit a homerun and somehow miss home plate on their way in, how long would they have to go back and touch it?

Moreover, say somebody hits a home run and trips and kills himself over second base. Could the manager put in a pinch hitter to continue to home plate for the batter?

The runner at home would be live until the ump made a call. You see that all the time with catchers pursuing guys to tag them after blocking the plate. If a guy just walked back to the dugout, and no safe signal was given then the other team could appeal when the new ball is put into play, using the appeal play and would then be ruled out by the home plate ump.

I imagine once the guy enters the dugout, he is out of bounds and would be ruled out, but I admit I am speculating.

I don't have any idea what the answer is for a guy who dies while running the basepaths. I'm not sure the answer has ever come up, but guys who get knocked cold by pitches are allowed to be substituted for without having to touch first base so I imagine this would fall under that category.

You remember the Robin Ventura walk-off grand slam where he was picked up and carried off after rounding first because the game was tied and the first run to score won it? Robin was credited with a single and one RBI.

voodoochile
04-14-2004, 11:09 PM
Originally posted by TornLabrum
The rule is basically this:

When a hit causes the winning run to score, the game is over as soon as the winning run touches the plate, and the batter is given credit for as many bases as is necessary for the winning run to score. In this case, Harris was on third, so only a single was necessary for the run to cross the plate. Crede gets credit for a single and one RBI.

The only exception to this rule, and this was not even instituted until about 1920 is the walk off homer. In that case, since the defense can't do anything about it to prevent it, the batter is given credit for the HR and as many RBI as would score if the homer did not end the game.

They still have to round the bases to get credit for the HR and the RBI's.

Clembasbal
04-14-2004, 11:17 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
They still have to round the bases to get credit for the HR and the RBI's.

Correct, because when Ventura hit that one for the Mets in like the 2000 or so playoffs it was considered a single because he never finished rounding the bases because the team mobbed him at 2B.

TornLabrum
04-14-2004, 11:20 PM
Originally posted by voodoochile
They still have to round the bases to get credit for the HR and the RBI's.

Correct. See Ventura, Robin.

RKMeibalane
04-14-2004, 11:48 PM
I remember that Ventura homer well. It was off of John "The Racist" Rocker in Game 4 of the 1999 NLCS.

dllrbll7
04-14-2004, 11:55 PM
Originally posted by RKMeibalane
I remember that Ventura homer well. It was off of John "The Racist" Rocker in Game 4 of the 1999 NLCS.

What is John Rocker doing now?