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Viva Magglio
04-04-2004, 07:44 PM
People, rightly or wrongly, are convinced that Mark McGwire, Sammy Sosa, and Barry Bonds bulked up on steroids and went on to break HR records with this steroid enhancement. I have no proof that they actually took steroids, but there is overwhelming circumstantial evidence that they have. If they indeed took steroids, should their home run records be erased from the record books?

manuelsucks
04-04-2004, 08:38 PM
That's a tough question to answer, but I had to say no, because they did indeed break the records, and even if they did take steroids, their is no doubt that they have untouchable power, on steroids or not. Even if it's shown they did or didn't take steroids, those people you mention will be synonymous with steroids.

Malgar 12
04-04-2004, 09:13 PM
As long as there was proof that they were steroid induced, which is all but impossible at this point, they should be erased.

Otherwise, Ben Johnson is the 88 Gold Medalist, Lyle Alzado is still alive, and Ken Caminitti still has testicles.

idseer
04-04-2004, 10:28 PM
Originally posted by manuelsucks
and even if they did take steroids, their is no doubt that they have untouchable power, on steroids or not.

what the heck does this mean?

duke of dorwood
04-04-2004, 10:33 PM
They took them-the records shouldnt count. PERIOD

SoxFan76
04-05-2004, 12:02 AM
The way I see it is that Bonds always had pop in his bat, even when he was skinny. If he didn't take steroids, he is still one hell of a hitter. Sammy on the other hand was not a good hitter, or a power hitter. Basically fly outs to center became home runs.

Hangar18
04-05-2004, 12:26 AM
I just thought about something. Ken Griffey. How does a guy constantly keep getting "tendon" injuries? I liked Ken Griffey, and now im getting very suspicious of the fact HE may have been using Steroids regularly, and now its catching up to him.

kermittheefrog
04-05-2004, 01:32 AM
Overwhelming evidence? That should have been in teal right?

mweflen
04-05-2004, 02:54 AM
agree with the above - if it can be proven, records *should* be ditched.

but that's a pretty big IF.

based on past MLB history though, the best we can hope for is an asterix.

santo=dorf
04-05-2004, 03:16 AM
Originally posted by Hangar18
I just thought about something. Ken Griffey. How does a guy constantly keep getting "tendon" injuries? I liked Ken Griffey, and now im getting very suspicious of the fact HE may have been using Steroids regularly, and now its catching up to him.

Is that you BlackJack?

SSN721
04-05-2004, 09:04 AM
I would have to say no, just because there is no way you can go back and time and test them. So even if they tested positive now it doesn't mean necessarily they took them back then. I personally do believe most of those guys did take steroids but since I don't have concrete evidence I have to say their records cant be erased on suspicion. I don't think that is right.

fledgedrallycap
04-05-2004, 09:15 AM
The simple fact of the matter is they don't test, therfore there are no rules being broken to abolish the records

idseer
04-05-2004, 09:24 AM
i agree with most here who say there's no way to prove it this far after the fact.
otoh, i believe very firmly that the players who shattered the hr records were indeed enhanced. the result for me is that baseball no longer means what it once meant. and there is no way to recapture the integrity of the game (if it ever really existed).

ode to veeck
04-05-2004, 09:49 AM
i agree with most here who say there's no way to prove it this far after the fact.
otoh, i believe very firmly that the players who shattered the hr records were indeed enhanced. the result for me is that baseball no longer means what it once meant. and there is no way to recapture the integrity of the game (if it ever really existed).

Exactly. The records have become meaningless. The only possible way integrity could be restored would be for the juicers to voluntarily admit who they were, individually or by group, in enough numbers to remove 99% of the juicers' records, a highly unlikely scenario.

The only other alternative is for baseball to go further down the path towards wrestling and become a contest of the human capability to hit a baseball to the extent that such human capacity can be enhanced by science and let everyone juice freely, meaning there'd then three be eras to baseball records: the old, the modern era, & the chemical man era

Jerko
04-05-2004, 10:17 AM
I just wonder how much of an affect steroids really have. I know they are "enhancers" and I don't condone the usage of them, but it's not like Scammy's or Bonds' homers just barely clear the fences. I would bet that all of the "water shots" that bonds hits would be homers even without roids. I am not saying that makes it right, but that is another factor to be taken into account when deciding if HR records should be erased. It would be impossible to do.

Dadawg_77
04-05-2004, 10:33 AM
First, steroids haven't been shown to increase bat speed enough for them have a marginal effect on the game. This issue stills needs to be studied.

Second, no proof of steroid use have been shown yet.

Thirdly, did the athletes of the past use drugs or other substances to artificially improve their performance? If so, how can we strike down records which were created by players on performance enhancing drugs.