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View Full Version : WGN broacasts of home games in HD


ode to veeck
02-28-2004, 04:16 PM
WGN Scrubs and Sox home broadcasts in HD (http://wgntv.trb.com/sports/wgntv-sports-hdtv121803,0,7972333.story?coll=wgntv-sports-1)

I don't know if this's been posted yet, saw it this morning trying to find the WGN spring training broadcast schedule.

Will be nice for local Chicagoans with HD, though its not likely to get picked up by downstream services like DirectTV's WGN channel, though you'll possibly note some additional HD replays on ESPN-HD if you buy this package and WGN passes onto ESPN highlights in HD format

ode to veeck
02-28-2004, 04:21 PM
that's nice, WGN TV's web site lists the Scrubs sched at the top of the sports featre page WGN snubs Sox by not listing them (http://wgntv.trb.com/sports/?track=nav) but no mention is made of the Sox (who rate lower than the lowly Bulls, who do rate a reference). I'm sure I'll find the Sox WGN sched ... eventually

TheRockinMT
02-28-2004, 04:25 PM
Ther cable outfit serving my community is just now upgrading to HD. I have an HD TV and we get WGN. Maybe it will work.

ChiWhiteSox1337
02-28-2004, 04:26 PM
Hawk in High Def! It's going to be amazing! The question is will this make the team that's on the field look better? Juan Uribe, Willie Hollywood Harris, and Aaron Rowand in high def!

Rex Hudler
02-28-2004, 05:14 PM
ESPN is not currently broadcasting Sportscenter in HD, even on ESPN-HD. So highlights fed to ESPN by WGN-HD will not be seen in high definition until that is changed. I have not heard specific information about when they expect the change to HD for Sportscenter.

Rex Hudler
02-28-2004, 05:45 PM
For those of you not real familar with the basics of High Definition, this breaks it down in its simplest terms.

To watch a program in true HD:

1. The program must be produced in HD (or converted to an HD format as in movies shot on film). TV Programs or sports shot in Standard Definition (SD) format cannot be converted to HD.
2. The program must be broadcast by the network and/or local station in the HD format.
3. You have to have an HD-ready TV, also called an HD monitor.
4. You have to have an HD Receiver. Most cable companies are providing HD receivers now for a few bucks a month or even free if you buy their HD programming. DirecTV and Dish Network subscribers will either have to rent one (DN does rent equipment, not sure about DTV) or purchase an HD Receiver, which begin around $400 and are available at local retailers.

An example, CSI is broadcast by CBS in HD format as well as SD. If you have an HD Receiver and an HD TV, your local CBS affiliate will still have to be broadcasting in HD for you to watch it in HD. Which local affiliates are broadcasting in HD vary based on your location. My guess is the local Chicago stations would all be in HD at this point. In Birmingham, the ABC affiliate is still not available in HD, but they expect that to change within a few weeks.

One last note: There are three different HD formats, 720p, 1080p and 1080i. There are definite differences in picture clarity of the different formats. Not all channels use the same format, so you will see differences in different stations. Discovery HD Theater and HDNet broadcast in 1080i and the picture is incredible. ESPN-HD is 720p, and while much better than SD, it doesn't measure up to the other two. WGN will broadcast in 1080i, which is great news.

Here are two sites have great information about everything High Definition, from programming, reception info, to equipment.

AVS Forum - HDTV (http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forumdisplay.php?forumid=6)

HDTV Galaxy (http://www.hdtvgalaxy.com/)

doublem23
02-28-2004, 05:47 PM
Originally posted by ChiWhiteSox1337
The question is will this make the team that's on the field look better?

:reinsy
And you fans thought I needed to pay for good players. Technology to the rescue again.

ode to veeck
02-28-2004, 06:02 PM
I don't think DirectTV rents boxes. I've bought all mine, sometimes for pennies though (on a revised DTV contract).

I don't know if I know of anything being broadcast yet in 1080p, and don't know if that's going to change until there's a lot more 1080p HD sets on the market. The ONLY one I know of at the moment that is true 1080p is the new Toshiba 57" LICOS (liquid crystal on CMOS), which nobody's as yet got in stock yet due to difficulties (rumor here) on getting quantities of the LICOS mirrors so far.

There's a HUGE difference between 720p and 1080i or p. Fox football HD was in 720p whereas the other networks HD games were 1080i. Great news for Chicago baseball fans with HD sets and tuners that the WGN games will be at 1080i.

Rex Hudler
02-28-2004, 06:05 PM
Originally posted by ode to veeck
I don't think DirectTV rents boxes. I've bought all mine, sometimes for pennies though (on a revised DTV contract).

I don't know if I know of anything being broadcast yet in 1080p, and don't know if that's going to change until there's a lot more 1080p HD sets on the market. The ONLY one I know of at the moment that is true 1080p is the new Toshiba 57" LICOS (liquid crystal on CMOS), which nobody's as yet got in stock yet due to difficulties (rumor here) on getting quantities of the LICOS mirrors so far.

There's a HUGE difference between 720p and 1080i or p. Fox football HD was in 720p whereas the other networks HD games were 1080i. Great news for Chicago baseball fans with HD sets and tuners that the WGN games will be at 1080i.

I have obviously not seen 1080p. Is there expected to be a huge difference between 1080i and 1080p? The difference between 720p and 1080i is easily noticeable.

ode to veeck
02-28-2004, 06:28 PM
The easily observed difference between 720p and 1080i is really due to the data density (1080 lines vs 720 lines) NOT because of interleaved vs progressive scan (i vs p).

I have been impressed by comparisons of interleaved vs progressive scans at the same data density, e.g. the more recent DVD progressive scan players really shine vs the more widely available and older interleaved scan DVD players. Again, the differences, while observable, are much smaller than those between formats of different data densities, e.g NTSC vs 500 vs 720 vs 1080, where each of the steps is pretty significant.

That said, baseball for WGN broadcast viewers in Chicago at 1080i ought to be pretty darn good this summer.

The other key to note for HD novices here is that if you are local but get your WGN over cable or DirectTV in Chicago area, it is not likely you'll be getting the HD broadcasts over these mediums. The reason is bandwidth, it takes on the order of 10x or more bandwidth for each HD channel, so most cable and sattelite operators offer, at best, an extremely limited set of HD channels (not typically including the locals who are broadcasting a number of programs in HD). I could be wrong about what's available locally, but thats the case in general elsewhere these days.

If you're going to go this route and add HD capable TV and HD tuner, you can get a lot of local HD programming (that you probably wouldn't get anytime soon via cable or sattelite) by adding a smaller HD specific antenna, which is about 10X smaller than the special antennas designed to catch both NTSC and HD. These HD only antennas are like a couple of feet big and give just as good HD reception as the big honking 'combo' terrestrial antennas.

Now if I could only build one tall enough to pick up WGN HD broadcasts of Sox home games all the way from Chicago ...